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Bedtime Monsters
     

Bedtime Monsters

by Josh Schneider
 

Creaking . . . Squeaking . . . Gnashing . . . Glinking . . .

Under the bed, deep in the closet, behind the radiator . . . the bedtime monsters are stirring, and poor Arnold is too scared to fall asleep. He’s powerless to get rid of them—and they don't seem to be more scared of him than he is of them, no matter what his mother

Overview

Creaking . . . Squeaking . . . Gnashing . . . Glinking . . .

Under the bed, deep in the closet, behind the radiator . . . the bedtime monsters are stirring, and poor Arnold is too scared to fall asleep. He’s powerless to get rid of them—and they don't seem to be more scared of him than he is of them, no matter what his mother says. But even the most terrible, horrible monster has to be afraid of something, as Arnold eventually finds out in this empowering tale of harnessing the imagination and conquering nighttime fears.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Sarah Harrison Smith
Kids who like their bedtime books funny and not-so-sentimental will find Josh Schneider's Bedtime Monsters to their taste…Schneider's writing is as entertaining and sharp-edged as his almost contour-style line drawings, painted in transparent but deep hues of yellows, purples and blues. Children ready to laugh at nighttime fears and recognize a bit of themselves in strong-willed Arnold should find lots to enjoy…
Publishers Weekly
★ 08/26/2013
Schneider is on a roll. Following a Geisel Award for Tales for Very Picky Eaters and a hilarious tale of just deserts in The Meanest Birthday Girl, he upends the classic monster-under-the-bed story. During the day, Arnold loves pretending to be a monster, but nighttime is another matter, what with the “terrible toe biter” lurking in his bedroom. “Are you just as scared of me as I am of you?” Arnold asks the large, purple creature with a white athletic sock hanging from a tusk. “No, of course not,” replies the monster, who is actually afraid of the “horrible tooth gnasher,” which is nervous about the “winged fargle,” and so on. Soon, Arnold’s bed is crammed with monsters, and annoyance replaces fear. Schneider expertly builds tension up to the “gotcha” ending, and his illustrations are filled with wildly imaginative perspectives, visual gags, and details, from the imaginary Fifth Avenue that Arnold trashes in the opening scene (a rubber ball stands in for the Guggenheim Museum) to the tiny butterfly wings that hold up the gargantuan winged fargle. Ages 4–8. Agent: Paul Rodeen, Rodeen Literary Management. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

"Schneider is on a roll. Following a Geisel Award for Tales for Very Picky Eaters and a hilarious tale of just deserts in The Meanest Birthday Girl, he upends the classic monster-under-the-bed story."
Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Arnold's playful imagination is evident in Schneider's watercolor, pen-and-ink, and colored pencil illustrations, and his bravery becomes obvious when he investigates the noises he hears in the night. Use this book for discussions about facing fears."
School Library Journal

"Schneider's watercolor creatures are a darling array of beaked, winged, clawed, and blubbered goofballs, supporting the text with just the right brand of off-center quirk."
Booklist

"The funny monster names and the sight of them crowded into Arnold's bed will help get scaredy-cats to read this for the first time, and once they've seen how the story turns out, they will want this worthy successor to Mercer Mayer's classic There's a Nightmare in My Closet read over and over again."
The Horn Book Magazine

"The real show-stealers here are the monsters themselves, who are mildly frightening with their nasty teeth and horrible claws but hilarious in their worried expressions."
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"A nifty story about the way our imaginations can get the better of us. . .This endearing picture book for 4- to 8-year-olds proves that, among other things, mother is always right."
Wall Street Journal

Praise for Tales for Very Picky Eaters

“Finally, a wonderfully clever book on eating right! Brilliant work from Josh Schneider!”
Portland Book Review
 
“Stories with all the wit and good humor parents can often lose during dinner table battles.”
Chicago Tribune
 
“Eager and picky eaters alike will enjoy the wordplay and outrageous situations, which create humor from a familiar source of family tension.”
Booklist
 
“Wholly fresh and unexpected advice.”
Kirkus
 
“Sure to be a crowd pleaser.”
School Library Journal

 
 

Children's Literature - Susan Treadway
Language buffs aside, this interactive tale brings Where the Wild Things Are into a child’s direct conversations with bedroom intruders to address glinks, creaks, and smelly haunts right in his own bed. Frightened monsters seeking an imaginative little boy to comfort them? Indeed, there is a plethora of inventive terms to describe a most troubling night when Arnold attempts to fall asleep after a very busy day and three bedtime stories. Who is genuinely afraid of whom? Arnold cleverly turns the tables on the terrible toe biter, the horrible tooth gnasher, a winged fargle, and a grozny buzzler who all nervously ask a pointed question, “Are there any Arnolds around?” It turns out that Arnold has a powerful reputation, which leads to a rather surprising twist for an effective way to banish monsters. Sweet indeed, for a younger child who fears critters of the dark. Much less so for those who recognize one when seeing life-sized renderings in the book. Pages are splashed with vivid watercolor, pen and ink, and colored pencil in a similar fashion to Sendak’s timeless classic. Oh yes, monsters do shudder and quake and are very much alive. No worries, however, in this tamer story for assorted readers as the real Arnold finally has his bed to himself and goes to sleep. Unique descriptors do indeed tickle funny bones to bring a happy ending for the “Arnolds” who linger in the ominous shadows of night. Reviewer: Susan Treadway; Ages 4 to 8.
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Arnold knows he has nothing more to be afraid of at bedtime after the winged fargle, the horrible tooth gnasher, the grozny buzzler, and other monsters with their own fears crawl into his bed. These colorful figures lurk in the darkest corners of bedrooms, but, as Arnold discovers, the scary creatures have more in common with him than he could have imagined. Seeing these silly-looking beasties jumping at noises and hiding under the covers will help dispel any fears children may have about their own made-up critters. Arnold's playful imagination is evident in Schneider's watercolor, pen-and-ink, and colored pencil illustrations, and his bravery becomes obvious when he investigates the noises he hears in the night. Use this book for discussions about facing fears.—Tanya Boudreau, Cold Lake Public Library, AB, Canada
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
Since a monster lurks somewhere in the room of nearly every lively child at bedtime, another book about the experience is inevitable. When Arnold tries to delay his bedtime, his mother offers him the universal parental commonplace about dealing with fears, in this case, the monster that bites off toes: "I'm sure he's just as scared of you as you are of him." Of course, as soon as the light is out, the terrible toe biter appears, followed by the horrible tooth gnasher, the winged fargle and the grozny buzzler. Each takes refuge from the next under Arnold's covers. But it's Arnold, known for his destruction of New York (seen in the opening pages as an imaginative, playful rampage with block towers) and his biting off of animal heads (his bedtime cookie snack), the monsters fear most. Arnold's revelation of his identity sends the monsters back into the camouflage of his nighttime room, their outlines visible against the slightly open door of the closet, the radiator knob, the mobile above Arnold's bed and the toy under the bed. Schneider's cartoon style and plain, sturdy boy (with no pupils, like Little Orphan Annie) allow the only slightly scary monsters to stand out a bit--each quite different from the next. Sure to be someone's first choice of bedtime tale for a few nights. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780544002708
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/22/2013
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Josh Schneider is the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award-winning creator of  Tales for Very Picky Eaters, as well as The Meanest Birthday Girl. His first book for Clarion, You'll Be Sorry, was named "Book That Provides Best Ammunition to Parents Weary of Warning Their Kids About Socking Their Siblings" by Publishers Weekly magazine. He lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

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