Beethoven Forum, Volume 3

Beethoven Forum, Volume 3

by Beethoven Forum
     
 
The opening essay by James Webster, "Beethoven in Vienna, 1792-1802: An 'Early' Period?", evaluates the critical tradition of dividing Beethoven’s career into three periods—early, middle, and late—and shows both their artificiality and their implications, including a tendency to undervalue early works. Jürgen May’s essay

Overview

The opening essay by James Webster, "Beethoven in Vienna, 1792-1802: An 'Early' Period?", evaluates the critical tradition of dividing Beethoven’s career into three periods—early, middle, and late—and shows both their artificiality and their implications, including a tendency to undervalue early works. Jürgen May’s essay "Beethoven and Prince Karl Lichnowsky," considers Beethoven’s relations with one of the first of his most important patrons.

In "Beethoven before 1800: The Mozart Legacy," Lewis Lockwood examines Beethoven’s sketchbooks to describe how Beethoven composed with and against models from Mozart. Glenn Stanley's essay, "The 'wirklich gantz neue Mainer' and the Path to It: Beethoven's Variations for Piano, 1783-1802," surveys Beethoven’s sets of piano variations written in his first decade in Vienna and argues the importance of the variations in Beethoven's progress as a composer.

In 'Pathos and the Pathétique," Elaine R. Sisman provides a historical and aesthetic analysis of one of Beethoven’s most popular piano sonatas. The composition of one of Beethoven's most popular violin sonatas, the "Spring" sonata is traced in the sketchbooks by Carl Schachter in "The Sketches of the Sonata for Piano and Violin, Op. 24."

Nicholas Marston's "Stylistic Advance, Strategic Retreat: Beethoven's Sketches for the Finale," also pays precise attention to Beethoven's sketches to discover how the composition of the Second Symphony illuminates Beethoven's work on an "underlying idea." In "Hybrid Themes: Toward a Refinement in the Classification of Classical Theme Types," William E. Caplin defines "hybrid themes" and shows their variety in Beethoven’s early compositions.

William Kinderman concludes the volume with a review article on Klaus Kropfinger’s Wagner and Beethoven and its study of the "battle for Beethoven" that racked nineteenth-century European music.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Serials devoted to Beethoven are either published intermittently or are now defunct; should Beethoven Forum prosper, it would be the only ongoing source of serious Beethoven scholarship in the world. Although written for musicians, it will appeal to wider audiences, especially in historically oriented material (e.g., the effects of economic inflation on Beethoven's lifestyle; the composer's debt to Shakespeare's The Tempest ; and the unknown authorship of newly discovered cadenzas). Quality ranges from William Kinderman's rambling, difficult discussion on the opus 110 sonata to Richard Kramer's well-written and revelatory study of the structure of the opus 130 quartet. Most of the musical analyses are fashionably tolerant of subjective and intuitive approaches. All in all, this is a commanding debut that serious music collections should consider. --Daniel Fermon, Museum of Modern Art Lib., New York

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803242463
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Publication date:
03/28/1995
Series:
Beethoven Forum Series
Pages:
189
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

This volume is guest edited by Glenn Stanley, who organized the 1993 conference, Beethoven in Vienna 1792-1803: the First Style Period where these essays were first presented and discussed.

Christopher Reynolds is a professor and chair of the Department of Music at the University of California at Davis. His articles have appeared in Journal of the American Musicological Society, Nineteenth-Century Music, and Early Music History. Lewis Lockwood is Fanny Peabody Proessor of Music at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the Einstein, Kinkeldey, and Marraro prizes and author of Beethoven: Studies in the Creative Process, and Music in Renaissance Ferrara. James Webster is a professor of music at Cornell University. He received the Kinkeldey award for his book, Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and the Idea of Classical Style.

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