Beethoven Forum, Volume 4

Beethoven Forum, Volume 4

by Beethoven Forum, Christopher Reynolds, James Webster, Lewis Lockwood
     
 

In "Deconstructing Periodization," Tia DeNora examines how historical depictions of Beethoven’s work in late eighteenth-century Vienna. K. M. Knittel have tended to impose patterns rather than reveal them. When perceived through modern sociological and ethnographic methods, Beethoven's early career is neither as neat nor as evolutionary as often supposed. K.

Overview


In "Deconstructing Periodization," Tia DeNora examines how historical depictions of Beethoven’s work in late eighteenth-century Vienna. K. M. Knittel have tended to impose patterns rather than reveal them. When perceived through modern sociological and ethnographic methods, Beethoven's early career is neither as neat nor as evolutionary as often supposed. K. M. Knittel also looks critically at traditional assumptions in "Imitation, Individuality, and Illness: Behind Beethoven's Three Styles."
 
Two of Beethoven's most beloved piano sonatas are placed in wider cultural contexts by Janet Schmalfeldt and Thomas Sipe. Schmalfeldt examines "Form as the Process of Becoming: The Beethoven-Hegelian Tradition and the 'Tempest' Sonata: and Sipe considers the critical reception of op. 57 in "Beethoven, Shakespeare, and the 'Appassionata'."
 
Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is his most famous, sometimes, it seems, too famous to be heard afresh. But Richard Taruskin identifies a potential borrowing in "Something New about the Fifth." And, drawing on Beethoven's sketches, Alain Frogley demonstrates subtle connections between rhythmic patterns and tonal plan in" Beethoven's Struggle for Simplicity in the Sketches for the Third Movement of the Sixth Symphony."
 
In "Florestan Reading Fidelio," Christopher Reynolds clarifies how Romantic composers trod the narrow path between emulating great composers and expressing themselves originally. Reynolds looks at Brahms and Wagner, among others, with special attention to Schumann's studies of Fidelio. In "Beethoven with or without Kunstgepräng': Metrical Ambiguity Reconsidered," . William Rothstein contributes a precise analysis of one of Beethoven’s complex compositional techniques.

Editorial Reviews

Der Spiegel

"Fundamental research and topicality, once the domain of the Beethoven-Haus in Bonn, are admirably combined in the Forum."—Der Spiegel
Malcolm S. Cole

"Once again, the editors have achieved their long-standing goals of accommodating a wide variety of perspectives, stimulating debate on current issues of interest, and demonstrating the continued vitality of Beethoven studies…. With its abundant insights and revelations, this latest effort of outgoing editor-in-chief Christopher Reynolds and editors Lewis Lockwood and James Webster admirably sustains their accustomed praiseworthy standard."—Malcolm S. Cole, The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography
Library Journal
Serials devoted to Beethoven are either published intermittently or are now defunct; should Beethoven Forum prosper, it would be the only ongoing source of serious Beethoven scholarship in the world. Although written for musicians, it will appeal to wider audiences, especially in historically oriented material (e.g., the effects of economic inflation on Beethoven's lifestyle; the composer's debt to Shakespeare's The Tempest ; and the unknown authorship of newly discovered cadenzas). Quality ranges from William Kinderman's rambling, difficult discussion on the opus 110 sonata to Richard Kramer's well-written and revelatory study of the structure of the opus 130 quartet. Most of the musical analyses are fashionably tolerant of subjective and intuitive approaches. All in all, this is a commanding debut that serious music collections should consider. --Daniel Fermon, Museum of Modern Art Lib., New York

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803239166
Publisher:
UNP - Nebraska
Publication date:
02/28/1996
Series:
Beethoven Forum Series
Pages:
204
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.89(d)

Meet the Author


Christopher Reynolds is a professor and chair of the Department of Music at the University of California at Davis. His articles have appeared in Journal of the American Musicological Society, Nineteenth-Century Music, and Early Music History. Lewis Lockwood is Fanny Peabody Proessor of Music at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the Einstein, Kinkeldey, and Marraro prizes and author of Beethoven: Studies in the Creative Process, and Music in Renaissance Ferrara. James Webster is a professor of music at Cornell University. He received the Kinkeldey award for his book, Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and the Idea of Classical Style.

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