Before Antietam: The Battle for South Mountain

Overview

Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced to attack the Confederates. The armies, from squad to corps level, fought hard in both cavalry and infantry actions for control of the three ...
See more details below
Paperback
$22.45
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$24.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $18.27   
  • New (3) from $18.27   
  • Used (2) from $22.44   
Sending request ...

Overview

Robert E. Lee, after decisively repelling John Pope's August 1862 invasion of Virginia at the Second Battle of Manassas, took the offensive. Moving north into Maryland, Lee divided his forces to capture Harpers Ferry while continuing his advance further into Union territory. George B. McClellan, the new Union commander, learned that Lee had divided his forces, and advanced to attack the Confederates. The armies, from squad to corps level, fought hard in both cavalry and infantry actions for control of the three gaps across South Mountain, about sixty miles from the Federal capital. The victory McClellan's officers and men gave him forced Lee to fall back and regroup near the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, thus setting the stage for the Civil War's bloodiest day which soon followed at Antietam Creek. Three days before that September day, the opposing armies fought a series of engagements that came to be known as the Battle of South Mountain. Until Before Antietam, those battles existed in our history as only a footnote to the events at Antietam. Because of the work of John Michael Priest those terrible encounters now have their rightful place in American military history.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The Battle for South Mountain during the Civil War has always been treated as a prelude to the major Battle of Antietam. Here, Priest, the author of several Civil War books, gives the first full study of the battle and emphasizes its importance. He details the troops' marches, bivouacs, and skirmishes but also gives the reactions of the civilians as they encounter the troops from both sides. The author uses the words and actions of the common soldiers involved, both blue and gray, to describe graphically the conditions preceding the battle, the intense fighting, and the horrrible conditions that were left afterward. Priest has used extensive letters, diaries, military records, and newspaper articles to create a vivid account of a battle for which both sides claimed a victory. Before Antietam sets the stage for the Battle of Antietam. It will make an excellent addition to all Civil War collections.-- W. Walter Wicker, Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston
From the Publisher

"The first full study of the battle."--Library Journal collections. --Library Journal

"John Michael Priest has done an admirable job capturing in detail this often overlooked precursor to the battle of Antietam."--Journal of American History

"Using an impressive array of primary accounts, Priest captures what it was like for both the Union and Confederate junior grade officers and their men on the march and in battle."--Journal of Southern History

"Priest has reprised the meticulous research and compelling story-telling that earned acclaim for his first book, Antietam: The Soldiers Battle, in a worthy prequel."--America's Civil War

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781572494077
  • Publisher: White Mane Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/2011
  • Pages: 458
  • Sales rank: 822,289
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

About the Author:
John Michael Priest is the author of Antietem: The Soldiers' Battle, and the editor in chief of From New Bern to Fredericksburg: Captain James Wren's Civil War Diary. He is a member of the Civil War Education Association in Winchester, Virginia, and is currently working on two other Civil War book projects.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)