Before I Say Good-Bye

( 76 )

Overview

A young woman probing into the mysterious circumstances of her husband's death receives a message from a medium claiming to be his channel in Mary Higgins Clark's #1 bestselling thriller,
BEFORE I SAY GOOD-BYE.
When Nell MacDermott learns that her husband, architect Adam Cauliff, and three of his business associates have died in an explosion of his new cabin cruiser, she is not only devastated but wracked with guilt. The last time she saw Adam,...

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Overview

A young woman probing into the mysterious circumstances of her husband's death receives a message from a medium claiming to be his channel in Mary Higgins Clark's #1 bestselling thriller,
BEFORE I SAY GOOD-BYE.
When Nell MacDermott learns that her husband, architect Adam Cauliff, and three of his business associates have died in an explosion of his new cabin cruiser, she is not only devastated but wracked with guilt. The last time she saw Adam, they had a bitter quarrel over her plan to run for the congressional seat long held by her grandfather; she had told him not to come home.
As the investigation into the boat's explosion proceeds, Nell learns that it was not an accident but a bomb. Despite her skepticism, Nell is swayed by her great-aunt Gert, a believer in psychic powers, to see a medium claiming to be Adam's channel.
While trying to unravel the threads of Adam's past and his violent end, Nell consults the medium, who transmits messages to her with instructions from Adam. The story reaches a powerful climax in Nell's final encounter with the medium, in which she learns the truth about the explosion — truth she can't be allowed to live and tell.

A powerful ESP experience in her past makes a woman candidate for Congress particularly receptive when a fraudulent psychic claims to have been in contact with the woman's missing husband. What she doesn't know is that she's been marked not just for a trickster's scam, but for murder itself. A master storyteller whose 21 previous international bestsellers have won her a loyal following among readers, Mary Higgins Clark pushes the boundaries in this new novel of intrigue and suspense that taps into our innermost fears of deception and betrayal. Here is Clark at the top of her form!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Spirited Suspense

Since the publication of her first blockbuster novel, Where Are the Children?, nearly 30 years ago, Mary Higgins Clark had been delighting her readers with high-class, spine-tingling suspense, becoming something of a legend in the publishing business. Her latest effort, Before I Say Good-bye, is no exception. It combines Clark's trademark woman-in-jeopardy theme with an elaborate plot that has more wrinkles in it than a shar-pei. And as if her usual chills and thrills weren't enough, Clark gives her readers a bonus in the form of a few ghosts and some spooky episodes of clairvoyance.

Nell MacDermott learned the meaning of tragedy at a tender age. She was only ten years old when she had a vision of her parents coming to school to say goodbye to her. Within an hour of that vision, Nell's grandfather, Congressman Cornelius MacDermott, arrived at the school with the news that Nell's parents had perished in a plane crash. Five years later, caught in a deadly riptide that threatened to drown her, Nell once again had a "visit" from her parents. This time, they gave her the courage and strength to hold on when her struggles against the riptide threatened to overwhelm her.

As an adult living in Manhattan, Nell views her strange experiences with a cautious and somewhat jaundiced eye. While she doesn't doubt the reality of what happened, she finds it hard to buy into the whole paranormal experience in general. And that suits her grandfather just fine, given that he expects Nell to step into his shoes as a congressman now that he's retired. Nell isn't averse to the idea; the old man's political inclinations are in her blood, too. But her husband, Adam, whom Cornelius has never liked, is strongly opposed to the idea.

Adam's objections become a moot point when his boat, occupied by himself and three other people, is blown to bits in a mysterious explosion. Reeling from her husband's death, Nell is forced to take a second look at her life...and her marriage. She doesn't much care for what she sees, and the picture rapidly grows worse when an investigation into the explosion reveals that it was no accident. Faced with the possibility that her husband wasn't who she thought he was and that a killer may well be on the loose, Nell is pulled into her own investigation. Her unusual abilities provide some assistance, but by the time the complex truth is revealed, Nell has had several visions of people's deaths -- including her own.

Clark has always been a master plotter, and her shrewd use of clever red herrings makes Before I Say Good-bye a treat for mystery fans. The characters are complex enough to be intriguing, imperfect enough to seem real, and enmeshed in a story that bundles up several deadly sins -- avarice, envy, pride, and wrath. The twists and turns will keep readers enthralled and guessing right up until the end. And the paranormal elements make for a spirited visit to a world where nothing is what it seems -- in this realm or the next. This one is Mary Higgins Clark at her chilling and charming best.

—Beth Amos

From the Publisher
The New York Times Book Review Mary Higgins Clark knows what she's doing....This savvy author comes up with something unexpected....A hold-your-breath ending.

Publishers Weekly Romantic suspense has no more reliable champion than Mary Higgins Clark. Her characters are...breezy and fun, and so is this confection of a book.

Los Angeles Times For someone who loves plot, Mary Higgins Clark's Before I Say Good-bye should be like manna from heaven....America's "Queen of Suspense" clearly knows what her readers want. Here she provides it, in spades.

New York Post A smooth and easy read.

The Hartford Courant(CT) The storytelling skills of the newest grand master of mystery writing have never been better.

The Christian Science Monitor Clark holds the reins the whole way through this tale of mischief and secrets, allowing us to unwind her labyrinth of hidden clues only as she wants them to unfold.

The Knoxville News-Sentinel(TN) Hard to put down....It's what a vacation book should be.

Tulsa World(OK) Yet another pearl Clark can add to her worldwide bestsellers.

Midwest Book Review Fun and exciting....Clark provides her myriad of fans with another enthralling tale filled with action and adventure.

The Anniston Star (AL) Fascinating enough that I read it through in one sitting....Well worth reading for all your mystery fans.

Library Journal
With an intriguing story line embellished by psychic phenomena and extrasensory perception, this novel is another best seller. Nell McDermott is a political columnist and the granddaughter of a wealthy, well-connected, retired Congressman who has raised her since both her parents were killed in an accident. Nell had the psychic gift then to feel the presence of her parents' spirits right after they died, although she was not present at the scene of their deaths. Cornelius McDermott, her grandfather, has spent most of his political career preparing Nell as his prot g e and heir apparent in the New York political scene. But when Nell marries Adam Cauliff, an architect on the rise, her political ambitions are suspended; all she wants is a happy, workable marriage. Still, her powerful grandfather wants her to run for his Congressional seat. Good characterizations by Jan Maxwell; expect this to circulate.--Kristin M. Jacobi, Eastern Connecticut State Univ., Willimantic Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Kirkus Reviews
Clark's heavy-breathing 22nd asks who planted a bomb on a rising architect's yacht, and whether the killer may be closing in on his widow. One minute the Cornelia II was lying peacefully at anchor off New York Harbor; the next a fireball had reduced the ship to ashes, along with its four passengers: owner Adam Cauliff, who'd planned the harbor outing as a way of bringing together the major participants in the Vandermeer Tower project he'd designed; Winifred Johnson, the loyal assistant who'd followed him from his old architectural firm; Vandermeer contractor Sam Krause; and Jimmy Ryan, probable site manager for the job. Krause, about to be indicted for bid fixing, leaves no one behind to lament his abrupt passing. But Adam and Jimmy are copiously mourned by their widows, old-money newspaper columnist Nell MacDermott, inconsolable because she'd just quarreled with Adam over her decision to seek her grandfather's old congressional seat, and no-money manicurist Lisa Ryan, who can't imagine how she'll raise the three children Jimmy left behind. But some fortuitous discoveries among Adam's and Jimmy's effects—secret compartments, safe-deposit-box keys, and all the rest—swiftly persuade their wives that there was more to the explosion than the leaking fuel line police had originally favored, and a young child who witnessed the blast has been having nightmares that suggests somebody may have survived. Was it Adam, Jimmy, Winifred, or Krause? Or was the whole scheme engineered by Peter Lang, the big-deal developer who'd masterminded the Vandermeer project but missed the boat that took his fellow-players to Davy Jones's locker?Lesssuspense and more honest-to-goodness mystery than most of Clark's best-selling output (We'll Meet Again, 1999, etc.), though the author telegraphs each twist so conscientiously that few fans will be fooled. Literary Guild main seledtion; author tour
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671004576
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 4/3/2001
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 103,422
  • Product dimensions: 4.30 (w) x 6.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Higgins Clark, #1 international and New York Times bestselling author, has written thirty-three suspense novels; three collections of short stories; a historical novel, Mount Vernon Love Story; two children’s books, including The Magical Christmas Horse; and a memoir, Kitchen Privileges. She is also the coauthor with Carol Higgins Clark of five holiday suspense novels. Her books have sold more than 100 million copies in the United States alone.

Biography

The Queen of Suspense, Bronx-born and -bred Mary Higgins Clark has achieved international success against heavy odds. Her father died when she was 11, and her mother struggled to raise and provide for Mary and her two brothers. Clark attended secretarial school after high school and worked for three years in an advertising agency before leaving to become a stewardess for Pan American Airlines. Throughout 1949, she flew international flights to Europe, Africa, and Asia. " I was in a revolution in Syria and on the last flight into Czechoslovakia before the Iron Curtain went down," she recalls. In 1950, she quit her job to marry Warren Clark, a neighbor nine years her senior whom she had known and admired since she was 16.

In the early years of her marriage, Clark began writing short stories, making her first sale in 1956 to Extension Magazine. Between writing and raising a family, the decade flew by. Then, in 1964, Warren Clark suffered a fatal heart attack, leaving his young widow with five children to support. She went to work writing radio scripts; and, around this time, she decided to try her hand at writing books. Inspired by a radio series she was working on, she drafted a biographical novel about George Washington. It was published in 1969 under the title Aspire to the Heavens. (In 2002, it was re-issued as Mount Vernon Love Story.) Her first suspense novel, Where Are the Children?, appeared in print in 1975. It was a huge hit and marked a turning point in her life. Since then, she has developed a loyal fan base, and each of her novels has hit the bestseller lists. She has also co-written stories and novels with her daughter Carol, a successful author in her own right.

In the 1970s, Clark enrolled in Fordham University at Lincoln Center, graduating summa cum laude in 1979. A great supporter of education, she has served as a trustee of her alma mater and Providence College and holds numerous honorary degrees. She remains active in Catholic affairs and has been honored with many awards. Her publisher, Simon & Schuster, funds an annual award in her name to be given to authors of suspense fiction writing in the Mary Higgins Clark tradition.

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    1. Hometown:
      Saddle River, New Jersey and New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 24, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      New York University; B.A., Fordham University, 1979
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Nell set off at a brisk pace on her familiar walk from her apartment on Park Avenue and Seventy-third Street to her grandfather's office on Seventy-second and York. From the peremptory summons she had received, demanding that she be there by three o'clock, she knew that the situation with Bob Gorman must have come to a head. As a result she was not looking forward to the meeting.

Deep in thought, she was oblivious to the admiring glances that occasionally came her way. After all, she and Adam were happily married. Still, she knew that some people found a tall woman, with the slim, strong body of an athlete, short chestnut-colored hair that was now forming into humidity-caused ringlets, midnight-blue eyes, and a generous mouth, attractive. While growing up, and frequently attending public events with her grandfather, Nell's rueful observation was that when the media described her, that was usually the word used — "attractive."

"To me, attractive is like having a guy say, 'She's not much to look at, but what a personality!' It's the kiss of death. Just once I want to be described as 'beautiful' or 'elegant' or 'stunning' or even 'stylish,'" she had complained when she was twenty.

Typically, her grandfather's comment had been, "For God's sake don't be so silly. Be grateful you've got a head on your shoulders and know how to use it."

The trouble was that she knew already what he wanted to discuss with her today, and the way he was going to ask her to use her head was a problem. His plans for her and Adam's objections to them were most decidedly an issue.

At eighty-two, Cornelius MacDermott had lost little of the vigor that for decades had made him one of the nation's most prominent congressmen. Elected at thirty to represent the midtown Manhattan district where he had been raised, he stayed in that spot for fifty years, resisting all arguments to run for the Senate. On his eightieth birthday he had chosen not to run again. "I'm not trying to beat Strom Thurmond's record as the longest-serving guy on the Hill," he had announced.

Retirement for Mac meant opening a consulting office and making sure that New York City and State stayed in his party's political fold. An endorsement from him was a virtual laying on of hands for neophyte campaigners. Years ago he had created his party's most famous election commercial on TV: "What did that other bunch ever do for you?" followed by silence and a succession of bewildered expressions. Recognized everywhere, he could not walk down the street without being showered with affectionate and respectful greetings.

Occasionally he grumbled to Nell about his status as a local celebrity: "Can't set foot outside my door without making sure I'm camera ready."

To which she replied, "You'd have a heart attack if people ignored you, and you know it."

When she reached his office today, Nell waved to the receptionist and walked back to her grandfather's suite. "The mood?" she asked Liz Hanley, his longtime secretary.

Liz, a handsome sixty-year-old, with dark brown hair and a no-nonsense expression, raised her eyes to heaven. "It was a dark and stormy night," she said.

"Oh boy, that bad," Nell said with a sigh. She tapped on the door of the private office as she let herself in. "Top of the day, Congressman."

"You're late, Nell," Cornelius MacDermott barked, as he spun his desk chair around to face her.

par"Not according to my watch. Three on the dot."

"I thought I told you to get here by three."

"I had a column to turn in, and unfortunately my editor shares your sentiments about punctuality. Now, how about showing me the winning smile that melts the voters' hearts?"

"Today I haven't got one. Sit down, Nell." Mac-Dermott indicated the couch situated beneath the corner window that offered panoramic views of the city east and north. He had chosen that office because it gave him a view of his longtime congressional district.

Nell called it his fiefdom.

As she settled on the couch, she looked at him anxiously. There was an unfamiliar weariness in his blue eyes, clouding his usual keenly observant expression. His erect carriage, even when he was seated, always gave the impression that he was taller than his actual height, but today even that seemed diminished. Even Mac's famous shock of white hair appeared thinner. As she watched, he clasped his hands together and shrugged his shoulders as though trying to dislodge an invisible burden. With sinking heart, Nell thought for the first time in her memory that her grandfather looked his age.

He stared past her for a long moment, then got up and moved to a comfortable armchair near the couch.

"Nell, we've got a crisis, and you've got to solve it. After being nominated for a second term, that weasel Bob Gorman has decided not to run. He's been offered a sweetheart deal to head up a new Internet company. He'll serve out his term till the election but says he can't afford to live on a congressman's salary. I pointed out to him that when I helped him get the nomination two years ago, all he talked about at the time was a commitment to serving the people."

She waited. She knew that last week her grandfather had heard the first rumors about Gorman not running for a second term. Obviously the rumors had been confirmed.

"Nell, there's one person — and only one, in my opinion — who could step in and keep that seat in the party." MacDermott frowned. "You should have done it two years ago when I retired and you know it." He paused. "Look, it's in your blood. You wanted to do it from the start, but Adam talked you out of it. Don't let that happen again."

"Mac, please don't start on Adam."

"I'm not starting on anyone, Nell. I'm telling you that I know you, and you're a political animal. I've been grooming you for my job since you were a teenager. I wasn't thrilled when you married Adam Cauliff, but don't forget, I helped him to get his start in New York when I introduced him to Walters and Arsdale, a fine architectural firm and among my most valued supporters."

Mac's lips tightened. "It didn't make me look good when, after less than three years, Adam walked out on them, taking their chief assistant, and opened his own operation. All right, maybe that's good business. But from the outset, Adam knew my plans for you, your plans for yourself. What made him change his mind? You were supposed to run for my seat when I retired, and he knew it. He had no right to talk you out of it then, and he has no right to try to talk you out of it now."

"Mac, I enjoy being a columnist. You may not have noticed, but I get mighty good feedback."

"You write a darn good column. I grant you that. But it's not enough for you and you know it."

"Look, my reluctance now isn't that Adam asked me to give up the idea of running for office."

"No? Then what do you call it?"

"We both want children. You know that. He sug-

gested I wait until after that happens. In ten years I'll only be forty-two. That would be a good age to start running for elective office."

Her grandfather stood impatiently. "Nell, in ten years the parade will have passed you by. Events move too fast to wait. Admit it. You're aching to throw your hat in the ring. Remember what you said when you informed me you were going to call me Mac?"

Nell leaned forward, clasped her hands together and tucked them under her chin. She remembered; it happened when she was a freshman at Georgetown. At his initial protest, she had held her ground. "Look, you always say I'm your best friend, and your friends call you Mac," she had told him. "If I keep calling you Grandpa, I'll always be perceived as a kid. When I'm with you in public I want to be considered your aide-de-camp."

"What's that supposed to mean?" he had responded.

She remembered how she'd held up the dictionary. "Listen to the definition. In brief, an aide-de-camp is 'a subordinate or confidential assistant.' God knows for the present I'm both to you."

"For the present?" he had asked.

"Until you retire and I take over your seat."

"Remember, Nell?" Cornelius MacDermott said, breaking her reverie. "You were a cocky college kid when you said that, but you meant it."

"I remember," she said.

He came and stood right in front of her, leaning forward, his face right in front of hers. "Nell, seize the moment. If you don't, you'll regret it. When Gorman confirms that he isn't running, there'll be a scramble for the nomination. I want the committee to consider candidates behind you from the get-go."

"When is the get-go?" she asked cautiously.

"At the annual dinner, on the 30th. You and Adam will be there. Gorman will be announcing his intention to leave when his term is complete; he'll get teary-eyed and sniffle and say that, while it was a difficult decision for him to make, something has made it much easier. Then he's going to dry his eyes and blow his nose, point to you and bellow that you, Cornelia MacDermott Cauliff, are going to run for the seat previously occupied by your grandfather for nearly fifty years. It will be Cornelia replacing Cornelius. The wave of the third millennium."

Obviously pleased with himself and his vision, Mac-Dermott smiled broadly. "Nell, it'll bring the house down."

With a pang of regret, Nell remembered that two years ago, when Bob Gorman ran for Mac's seat, she had had a wild sense of impatience, a compulsion to be there, a need to see herself in his place. Mac was right. She was a political animal. If she didn't get into the arena now, it could be too late — or at least, too late for a shot at this seat, which was where she wanted to start a political career.

"What's Adam's problem, Nell? He didn't use to pull this stuff on you."

"I know."

"Is anything wrong between you two?"

"No." She managed a dismissive smile to signify the suggestion was absurd.

How long had it been going on? she wondered. At what point had Adam become distracted, even remote? At first her concerned questions, asking him what was wrong, had been brushed off lightly. Now she detected an edge of anger. Only recently she had told him point-blank that if there was a serious problem with their relationship, then she deserved to hear about it. "I mean any kind of problem, Adam. Being in the dark is the worst problem of all," she had said.

"Where is Adam?" her grandfather asked.

"He's in Philadelphia."

"Since when?"

"Yesterday. He's speaking at a seminar for architects and interior designers. He'll be back tomorrow."

"I want him at the dinner on the 30th, standing by your side, applauding your decision. Okay?"

"I don't know how much applauding he'll do," she said, a hint of dejection in her voice.

"When you were married he was gung-ho to be the spouse of a future politician. What happened to change his mind?"

You did, Nell thought. Adam became jealous of the time you demanded from me.

When she and Adam were first married, he'd been enthusiastic over the idea that she would continue to be active as Mac's assistant. But that had changed when her grandfather announced his retirement.

"Nell, we now have a chance for a life that doesn't revolve around the almighty Cornelius MacDermott," Adam had said. "I'm sick of your being at his beck and call. Do you think that will get better if you campaign for his old seat? I have news for you. He won't give you the chance to breathe, unless he's exhaling for you."

The children they'd hoped for hadn't arrived, and they became part of his argument. "You've never known anything except politics," Adam pleaded. "Sit it out, Nell. The Journal wants you to do a regular column. You might like the freedom."

His entreaties had helped her make the decision not to pursue the nomination. Now, as she considered her grandfather's arguments, along with his unique combination of ordering and coaxing her, Nell dispassionately admitted something to herself: commenting on the political scene wasn't enough. She wanted to be in on the action.

Finally she said, "Mac, I'm going to put my cards on the table. Adam is my husband and I love him. You, on the other hand, have never even liked him."

"That isn't true."

"Then let's put it another way. Ever since Adam opened his own firm, you've had the shiv out for him. If I run for this office, it will be like the old days. You and I will be spending a lot more day-to-day time together, and if that's going to work you've got to promise me that you'll treat Adam the way you'd want to be treated if the positions were reversed."

"And if I promise to embrace him to my bosom, then you'll run?"

When she left Cornelius MacDermott's office an hour later, Nell had given her word that she would seek the congressional seat being vacated by Bob Gorman.

Copyright © 2000 by Mary Higgins Clarke

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First Chapter

Chapter Nine Fifty-two-year-old Winifred Johnson never entered the lobby of her employer's apartment building on Park Avenue without feeling intimidated. She had worked with Adam Cauliff for three years, first at Walters and Arsdale, and then she had left with him last fall, when he started his own company. He relied on her from the beginning.

Even so, whenever she stopped by his apartment, she couldn't help feeling that one day the doorman would instruct her to use the delivery entrance around the corner.

She knew that her attitude was the result of her parents' lifelong resentment over imagined slights. Ever since she could remember, Winifred's ears had been filled with their plaintive tales of people who had been rude to them: They use their little bit of authority on people like us who can't fight back. Expect it, Winifred. That's the kind of world it is. Her father had gone to his grave railing against all the indignities he had suffered at the hands of his employer of forty years, and her mother was now in a nursing home, where complaints of supposed slights and deliberate neglect continued unabated.

Winifred thought about her mother as the doorman smilingly opened the door for her. A few years ago it had been possible for her to move her mother to a fancy, new nursing facility, but even that hadn't stopped the endless flow of complaints. Happiness -- even satisfaction -- did not seem to be possible for her. Winifred had recognized this same trait in herself and felt helpless. Until I smartened up, she told herself with a secret smile.

A thin woman, almost frail in appearance, Winifred typically dressed in conservativebusiness suits and limited her jewelry to button earrings and a strand of pearls. Quiet to the point that people often forgot she was even around, she absorbed everything, noticed everything and remembered everything. She had worked for Robert Walters and Len Arsdale from the time she graduated from secretarial school, but in all those years neither man had ever appreciated or even seemed to notice the fact that she had come to know everything there was to know about the construction business. Adam Cauliff, however, had picked up on it immediately. He appreciated her; he understood her true worth. He used to joke with her, saying, "Winifred, a lot of people had better hope you never write your autobiography."

Robert Walters overheard him and became both upset and unpleasant. But then Walters had always bullied her unmercifully; he never had been nice to her. Let him pay for that, Winifred thought. And he will.

Nell never appreciated him. Adam didn't need a wife with a career of her own and a famous grandfather who made so many demands on her that she didn't have enough time for her husband. Sometimes Adam would say, "Winifred, Nell's busy with the old man again. I don't want to eat alone. Let's grab a bite."

He deserved better. Sometimes Adam would tell her about being a kid on a North Dakota farm and going to the library to get books with pictures of beautiful buildings. "The taller the better, Winifred," he'd joke. "When someone built a three-story house in our town, folks drove twenty miles just to get a look at it."

Other times he would encourage her to talk, and she found herself gossiping with him about people in the construction industry. Then the next morning she would wonder if perhaps she had said too much, her loquaciousness enhanced by the wine Adam kept pouring. But she never really worried; she trusted Adam -- they trusted each other -- and Adam enjoyed her "insider" stories about the building world, tales from her earlier days with Walters and Arsdale.

"You mean that sanctimonious old bird was on the take when those bids went out?" he'd exclaim, then reassure her when she became flustered about talking so much. And then he'd promise never, ever to say a word to anyone about what she had told him. She also remembered the night he had said accusingly, "Winifred, you can't fool me. There's someone in your life." And she had told him, yes, even giving the name. And that was when she really began to trust him. She confided that she was taking care of herself.

The uniformed clerk at the lobby desk put down the intercom telephone. "You can go right up, Ms. Johnson. Mrs. Cauliff is expecting you."

Adam had asked her to pick up his briefcase and his navy jacket on the way to the meeting today. Being Adam, he had been apologetic about the request. "I left in a hell of a rush this morning and forgot them," he explained. "I left them on the bed in the guest room. The notes for the meeting are in my briefcase, and I'll need the jacket if I change my mind and decide to meet Nell at the Four Seasons." Winifred could sense from his tone that he and Nell must have had a serious misunderstanding, and hearing it only bolstered her certainty that their marriage was heading for the rocks.

As she rode up in the elevator, she thought about the meeting scheduled for later in the day. She was happy that the location for the meeting had been moved to the boat. She loved going out on the water. It seemed romantic, even when the purpose was strictly business.

There would be just five of them. In addition to herself, the three associates in the Vandermeer Tower venture -- Adam, Sam Krause and Peter Lang -- would be attending. The fifth was Jimmy Ryan, one of Sam's site foremen. Winifred wasn't sure why he'd been invited except that Jimmy had been pretty moody lately. Maybe they wanted to get to the heart of the problem and sort it out.

She knew they all would be concerned about the story that broke in today's newspapers, although she didn't feel any concern herself. In fact, she was rather impatient about the whole thing. The worst thing that ever happens in these situations, even if they get the goods on you, is you pay a fine, she told herself. You reach into your back pocket, and the problem goes away.

The elevator opened right onto the apartment foyer, where Nell was waiting for her.

Winifred saw the cordial smile of welcome on Nell's face fade as soon as she stepped forward. "Is something wrong?" she asked anxiously.

Dear God, Nell thought with sudden alarm, why is this happening? But as she looked at Winifred, she could almost hear the knowledge filtering through her being: Winifred's journey on this plane is completed.

Copyright © 2000 by Mary Higgins Clark

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2003

    Great Book!!!!

    This was a thoroughly enjoyable book. Like most people said, it does have a lot of characters. I was worried that i might not be able to follow it, so i wrote all the characters names down as they were introduced. It was much easier that way. This book was very easy to read, and each character introduced was vital to the plot. The only thing that kind of through me off was the way that the ending was so predictable. Still a MUST READ!!!! get this book for your own good.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2004

    Opinion of Before I Say Goodbye

    I enjoyed this book very much. Of course I am a lover of anything that has to do with the supernatural. This book was a definate page turner and you cannot put it down. It keeps you guessing the entire time. I loved this book so much that I was almost to the point of crying when the book ended. I think anyone would enjoy this book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2006

    Superb

    This is my second Mary Higgins Clark book, and I need no more to tell she is from now on one of my favorite authors. No matter how many clues one thinks she is giving, the next page puts some new doubts. Excellent book, excellent writer

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2012

    Recommended

    Not as action packed as her other stories. Still a good read. I love Mary Higgins Clark's books

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2014

    Great

    Great book! Loved the plot and characters! Very good romantic suspense novel! Loved it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Mary Higgins Clark is such a good author!

    Easy reading and very interesting!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Need to read it

    Don't want to put down but it's hard to keep up with all the characters

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  • Posted August 8, 2014

    Lots of twists and turns. This author delivers again!

    Life can be strange, and shocking. This book keeps you caught up in the plot right to the very end!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2014

    I allwaysloved mary higgins clarks books

    This wastoo much at once

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2014

    Mjhujgmb. Uhbtv

    Kmu. Vbh.y g. Gghuhygbjygnnhtum,nitv.vhi.ju unuh

    0 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2014

    Ekehdjgbejdhzbskjdbdkwishdn Evelyn

    IwjshxhxhbjjHDIWUYDG EVELYN

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2014

    What is this? Short story more than one novella novel

    Blub suggests more than one

    0 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    Ashley to Everyone

    Kenny; "I know you don't like me, but that doesn't change my feeling for you. You were the first guy that actually broke my heart....I still like you an always will, that is why I need to leave. I will miss you, even though you won't miss me. Sorry I failed you and tryed to get closer to you and everything. Sorry. I hope one day you will find it in your heart to forgive me. I promise one thing: Kenny you will never see me again this is goodbye. Hush, thanks for being an awesome friend, and i promise I will try my best to get you will Jordan befe I leave, but none of you will see me again. I know most of you will never read this but it's my goodbye letter. Bye."

    0 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    Lore

    "I will miss you so much!" ;-;

    0 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    Review

    Wonderful!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2005

    Not her usual level of suspense,

    but nonetheless a worthwhile read. An interesting set of clues in the beginning make the readers seriously ask if they can trust the one person they're supposed to trust...their spouses. Whether you're a believer in it or not, psychic phenomena make an enjoyable addition to the plot.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    Action Packed Thriller

    This action packed thriller grasped my attention as the book was nearing the end. Mary Higgins Clark uses many foreshadowing clues to disguise the ending, which is no sooner revealed, than the moment you shut the book. The novel also reveales to readers that dreams can come true, if only you overcome the many obstacles standing in your path.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2005

    OK, but not one of MHC'S best

    I love MHC and have read almost all of her books. Each book that I've read was fast paced and very intersting, but not this one. It was a lot of boring moments in it. If this is the first book read by MHC, don't get discouraged it gets better!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2004

    oooooooooooooooooh

    loved it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2002

    Great suspense - keeps the reader guessing

    I particularly liked this Higgins Clark novel. In fact, it has been my favorite of hers so far. True, there are a lot of characters, but they all play a crucial role in the plot of the story. The outcome keeps you guessing and it is a true page-turner.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 76 Customer Reviews

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