Before the Storm [NOOK Book]

Overview


Fifteen-year-old Andy Lockwood is special. Others notice the way he blurts out anything that comes into his mind, how he cannot foresee consequences, that he's more child than teenager. But his mother sees a boy with a heart as open and wide as the ocean.

Laurel Lockwood lost her son once through neglect. She's spent the rest of her life determined to make up for her mistakes, and she's succeeded in becoming a committed, protective parent—maybe even overprotective. Still, she ...

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Before the Storm

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Overview


Fifteen-year-old Andy Lockwood is special. Others notice the way he blurts out anything that comes into his mind, how he cannot foresee consequences, that he's more child than teenager. But his mother sees a boy with a heart as open and wide as the ocean.

Laurel Lockwood lost her son once through neglect. She's spent the rest of her life determined to make up for her mistakes, and she's succeeded in becoming a committed, protective parent—maybe even overprotective. Still, she loosens her grip just enough to let Andy attend a local church social—a decision that terrifies her when the church is consumed by fire. But Andy survives…and remarkably, saves other children from the flames. Laurel watches as Andy basks in the role of unlikely hero and the world finally sees her Andy, the sweet boy she knows as well as her own heart.

But when the suspicion of arson is cast upon Andy, Laurel must ask herself how well she really knows her son…and how far she'll go to keep her promise to protect him forever.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Chamberlain (The Bay at Midnight) lays out her latest piece of romantic suspense in a shattered chronology that's as graceful as it is perfectly paced. Most of the adults in the tightly knit coastal community of Topsail Island, N.C., accept the widowed Laurel Lockwood's 15-year-old mentally disabled son, Andy. But when Andy saves many of the town's youth during a tragic fire, he becomes a local hero who garners national attention. Laurel, caught up with making sure Andy is okay, thinks daughter Maggie, a high school senior, can handle herself. What Maggie hides from everyone are her slipping grades, a taboo affair and a terrible secret, and when the fire's origins are investigated and Andy is a person of interest, events turn progressively darker for the family. Long, juicy flashbacks cover the mysteries of Laurel's husband's death, of Andy's condition and of Laurel's preoccupation with him. Chamberlain offers no easy solutions, but her engrossing prose leads the way to redemption. (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
From the Publisher
"A complex and emotional story." —-RT Book Reviews
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781459246058
  • Publisher: Harlequin
  • Publication date: 2/26/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 56,849
  • File size: 431 KB

Meet the Author


Diane Chamberlain is the bestselling author of twenty novels, including The Midwife's Confession and The Secret Life of CeeCee Wilkes. Diane lives in North Carolina and is currently at work on her next novel. Visit her Web site at dianechamberlain.com and her blog at dianechamberlain.com/blog and her Facebook page at facebook.com/Diane.Chamberlain.Readers.Page.

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Read an Excerpt

Before The Storm
By Diane Chamberlain Mira

Copyright © 2008 Diane Chamberlain
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780778325413


Andy

When I walked back into my friend Emily's church,

I saw the pretty girl right away. She'd smiled and said "hey" to me earlier when we were in the youth building, and I'd been looking for her ever since. Somebody'd pushed all the long church seats out of the way so kids could dance, and the girl was in the middle of the floor dancing fast with my friend Keith, who could dance cooler than anybody. I stared at the girl like nobody else was in the church, even when Emily came up to me and said, "Where were you? This is a lock-in. That means you stay right here all night." I saw that her eyebrows were shaped like pale check marks. That meant she was mad.

I pointed to the pretty girl. "Who's that?"

"How should I know?" Emily poked her glasses higher up her nose. "I don't know every single solitary person here."

The girl had on a floaty short skirt and she had long legs that flew over the floor when she danced. Her blond hair was in those cool things America-African people wear that I could never remember the name of. Lots of them all over her head in stripes.

I walked past some kids playing cards on the floor and straight over to the girl. I stopped four shoe lengths away, which Mom always said was close enough. I used to get too close to people and made them squirmy. They need their personal space, Mom said. But even standing that faraway, I could see her long eyelashes. They made me think of baby bird feathers. I saw a baby bird close once. It fell out of the nest in our yard and Maggie climbed the ladder to put it back. I wanted to reach over and touch the girl's feather lashes, but knew that was not an appropriate thing.

Keith suddenly stopped dancing with her. He looked right at me. "What d'you want, little rich boy?" he asked.

I looked at the girl. Her eyes were blue beneath the feathers. I felt words come into my mind and then into my throat, and once they got that far, I could never stop them.

"I love you," I said.

Her eyes opened wide and her lips made a pink O. She laughed. I laughed, too. Sometimes people laugh at me and sometimes they laugh with me, and I hoped this was one of the laughing-with-me times.

The girl didn't say anything,but Keith put his hands on his hips. "You go find somebody else to love, little rich boy." I wondered how come he kept calling me little rich boy instead of Andy.

I shook my head. "I love her."

Keith walked between me and the girl. He was so close to me, I felt the squirmies Mom told me about. I had to look up at him which made my neck hurt. "Don't you know about personal space?" I asked.

"Look," he said. "She's sixteen.You're a puny fourteen."

"Fifteen," I said. "I'm just small for my age."

"Why're you acting like you're fourteen then?"He laughed and his teeth reminded me of the big white gum pieces Maggie liked. I hated them because they burned my tongue when I bit them.

"Leave him alone," the pretty girl said."Just ignore him and he'll go away."

"Don't it creep you out?" Keith asked her. "The way he's staring at you?"

The girl put out an arm and used it like a stick to move Keith away. Then she talked right to me.

"You better go away, honey," she said. "You don't want to get hurt."

How could I get hurt? I wasn't in a dangerous place or doing a dangerous thing, like rock climbing, which I wanted to do but Mom said no.

"What's your name?" I asked her.

"Go home to your fancy-ass house on the water," Keith said.

"If I tell you my name, will you go away?" the girl asked.

"Okay," I said, because I liked that we were making a deal.

"My name's Layla," she said.

Layla. That was a new name. I liked it. "It's pretty," I said.

"My name's Andy."

"Nice to meet you, Andy," she said. "So, now you know my name and you can go."

I nodded, because I had to hold up my end of the deal. "Goodbye," I said as I started to turn around.

"Retard." Keith almost whispered it, but I had very good hearing and that word pushed my start button.

I turned back to him, my fists already flying. I punched his stomach and I punched his chin, and he must have punched me too because of all the bruises I found later, but I didn't feel a thing. I kept at him, my head bent low like a bull, forgetting I'm only five feet tall and he was way taller. When I was mad, I got strong like nobody's business. People yelled and clapped and things, but the noise was a buzz in my head. I couldn't tell you the words they said. Just bzzzzzzzzz, getting louder the more I punched.

I punched until somebody grabbed my arms from behind, and a man with glasses grabbed Keith and pulled us apart. I kicked my feet trying to get at him. I wasn't finished.

"What an asshole!" Keith twisted his body away from the man with the glasses, but he didn't come any closer. His face was red like he had sunburn.

"He doesn't know any better," said the man holding me."You should. Now you get out of here."

"Why me?" Keith jerked his chin toward me."He started it! Everybody always cuts him slack."

The man spoke quietly in my ear."If I let go of you, are you going to behave?"

I nodded and then realized I was crying and everybody was watching me except for Keith and Layla and the man with glasses, who were walking toward the back of the church. The man let go of my arms and handed me a white piece of cloth from his pocket. I wiped my eyes. I hoped Layla hadn't seen me crying. The man was in front of me now and I saw that he was old with gray hair in a ponytail. He held my shoulders and looked me over like I was something to buy in a store. "You okay, Andy?"

I didn't know how he knew my name, but I nodded. "You go back over there with Emily and let the adults handle Keith." He turned me in Emily's direction and made me walk a few steps with his arm around me. "We'll deal with him, okay?" He let go of my shoulders.

I said "okay" and kept walking toward Emily, who was standing by the baptism pool thing.

"I thought you was gonna kill him!" she said.

Me and Emily were in the same special reading and math classes two days a week. I'd known her almost my whole life, and she was my best friend. People said she was funny looking because she had white hair and one of her eyes didn't look at you and she had a scar on her lip from an operation when she was a baby, but I thought she was pretty. Mom said I saw the whole world through the eyes of love.Next to Mom and Maggie, I loved Emily best.But she wasn't my girlfriend.Definitely not.

"What did the girl say?" Emily asked me.

I wiped my eyes again. I didn't care if Emily knew I was crying. She'd seen me cry plenty of times. When I put the cloth in my pocket, I noticed her red T-shirt was on inside out. She used to always wear her clothes inside out because she couldn't stand the way the seam part felt on her skin, but she'd gotten better. She also couldn't stand when people touched her. Our teacher never touched her but once we had a substitute and she put a hand on Emily's shoulder and Emily went ballistic. She cried so much she barfed on her desk. "Your shirt's inside out," I said.

"I know. What did the girl say?"

"That her name's Layla." I looked over at where Layla was still talking to the man with the glasses. Keith was gone, and I stared at Layla. Just looking at her made my body feel funny. It was like the time I had to take medicine for a cold and couldn't sleep all night long. I felt like bugs were crawling inside my muscles. Mom promised me that was impossible, but it still felt that way.

"Did she say anything else?" Emily asked.

Before I could answer, a really loud, deep, rumbling noise, like thunder, filled my ears. Everyone stopped and looked around like someone had said Freeze! I thought maybe it was a tsunami because we were so close to the beach. I was really afraid of tsunamis. I saw one on TV. They swallowed up people. Sometimes I'd stare out my bedroom window and watch the water in the sound, looking for the big wave that would swallow me up. I wanted to get out of the church and run, but nobody moved.

Like magic, the stained-glass windows lit up. I saw Mary and baby Jesus and angels and a half-bald man in a long dress holding a bird on his hand. The window colors were on every-body's face and Emily's hair looked like a rainbow.

"Fire!" someone yelled from the other end of the church, and then a bunch of people started yelling, "Fire! Fire!" Everyone screamed, running past me and Emily, pushing us all over the place.

I didn't see any fire, so me and Emily just stood there getting pushed around, waiting for an adult to tell us what to do. I was pretty sure then that there wasn't a tsunami. That made me feel better, even though somebody's elbow knocked into my side and somebody else stepped on my toes. Emily backed up against the wall so nobody could touch her as they rushed past. I looked where Layla had been talking with the man, but she was gone.

"The doors are blocked by fire!" someone shouted.

I looked at Emily."Where's your mom?" I had to yell because it was so noisy. Emily's mother was one of the adults at the lock-in, which was the only reason Mom let me go.

"I don't know." Emily bit the side of her finger the way she did when she was nervous.

"Don't bite yourself." I pulled her hand away from her face and she glared at me with her good eye.

All of a sudden I smelled the fire. It crackled like a bonfire on the beach. Emily pointed to the ceiling where curlicues of smoke swirled around the beams.

"We got to hide!" she said.

I shook my head. Mom told me you can't hide from a fire. You had to escape. I had a special ladder under my bed I could put out the window to climb down, but there were no special ladders in the church that I could see.

Everything was moving very fast. Some boys lifted up one of the long church seats. They counted one two three and ran toward the big window that had the half-bald man on it. The long seat hit the man, breaking the window into a zillion pieces, and then I saw the fire outside. It was a bigger fire than I'd ever seen in my life. Like a monster, it rushed through the window and swallowed the boys and the long seat in one big gulp. The boys screamed, and they ran around with fire coming off them.

I shouted as loud as I could, "Stop! Drop! Roll!"

Emily looked amazed to hear me tell the boys what to do. I didn't think the boys heard me, but then some of them did stop, drop and roll, so maybe they did. They were still burning, and the air in the church had filled up with so much smoke, I couldn't see the altar anymore.

Emily started coughing. "Mama!" she croaked.

I was coughing, too, and I knew me and Emily were in trouble. I couldn't see her mother anywhere, and the other adults were screaming their heads off just like the kids. I was thinking, thinking, thinking. Mom always told me, in an emergency, use your head. This was my first real emergency ever.

Emily suddenly grabbed my arm."We got to hide!" she said again. She had to be really scared because she'd never touched me before on purpose.

I knew she was wrong about hiding, but now the floor was on fire, the flames coming toward us.

"Think!" I said out loud, though I was only talking to myself. I hit the side of my head with my hand. "Brain, you gotta kick in!"

Emily pressed her face against my shoulder, whimpering like a puppy, and the fire rose around us like a forest of golden trees.

Maggie

MY FATHER WAS KILLED BY A WHALE.

I hardly ever told people how he died because they'd think I was making it up. Then I'd have to go into the whole story and watch their eyes pop and their skin break out in goose bumps. They'd talk about Ahab and Jonah,and I would know that Daddy's death had morphed into their entertainment. When I was a little girl,he was my whole world—my best friend and protector.He was awesome. He was a minister who built a chapel for his tiny congregation with his own hands. When people turned him into a character in a story,one they'd tell their friends and family over pizza or ice cream, I had to walk away. So, it was easier not to talk about it in the first place.If someone asked me how my father died, I'd just say "heart." That was the truth, anyway.

The night Andy went to the lock-in, I knew I had to visit my father—or at least try to visit him. It didn't always work. Out of my thirty or forty tries, I only made contact with him three times. That made the visits even more meaningful to me. I'd never stop trying.

I called Mom to let her know the lock-in had been moved from Drury Memorial's youth building to the church itself, so she'd know where to pick Andy up in the morning. Then I said I was going over to Amber Donnelly's, which was a total crock. I hadn't hung out with Amber in months, though we sometimes still studied together. Hanging out with Amber required listening to her talk nonstop about her boyfriend, Travis Hardy. "Me and Travis this," and "me and Travis that," until I wanted to scream. Amber was in AP classes like me, but you wouldn't know it from her grammar. Plus, she was such a poser, totally caught up in her looks and who she hung out with. I never realized it until this year.

Continues...


Excerpted from Before The Storm by Diane Chamberlain Copyright © 2008 by Diane Chamberlain. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

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(25)

4 Star

(14)

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(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 21, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    RIVETING!

    This is a complex story about Laurel, her life, her loves, her children.Laurel and Jaime have a baby, Maggie, after which she suffers from post-partum depression. As a result she felt unattached to her baby and a complete failure at everything. Laurel grew fond of and related to Jaime's brother, Marcus, who was the black sheep in the family and drank to cope. The next thing they knew Laurel was pulled into the drinking world too and slipped up one drunken night. Jaime and Laurel got back together just in time for Laurel to find out she's pregnant again. Still depressed and out of control, she continues to deaden her pain with wine coolers and as a result gives birth to a child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. That's Laurel's wake-up call to turn her life around. Riveting! Compelling! Powerful!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A reviewer

    Although her son Andy is fifteen years old, Nurse Laurel Lockwood keeps a close string on him because he suffers from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder an illness she blames on herself. Whenever she feels he can go off without her safely, she is anxious but guilt propels her to allow him. Besides the obvious she knows she is overprotective. Thus Andy attends a youth function at their church Drury Memorial where everyone knows he is different as his ingenuousness makes him socially immature.----------------- When a fire breaks out in the church several people die, but heroic Andy saves many others. Laurel is elated that her son not only survived, but he saved lives. However, her euphoria turns to horror when a witness claims seeing Andy outside the church before the fire because of his handicap most consider him the arsonist even Laurel has doubts about her son¿s innocence.---------------- The complex tale grips readers as the audience obtains a deep look at how a tragic event impacts on the lives of several individuals, to include not just mother and son, but his older sister Maggie and others. Diane Chamberlain effortlessly changes perspective, which enables the reader to not only see what that person sees, but also into how their present perspective is impacted by their relative past. With a plausible critical spin BEFORE THE STORM is a fascinating tale as a smothering mother recalls her vow when Andy was ten hours old and taken from her, but fears this incident tests her resolve.------------ Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2010

    Awesome Read

    I love everything by Diane Chamberlain. This happened to be the 2nd book of hers that I read. Make sure that you read this book FIRST before reading "The Secrets She Left Behind" as it is a continuation of this book. Fortunately I read them in order but didn't realize the 2 books went together when I first purchased them.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2008

    Powerfully Haunting

    I found Before the Storm, by Diane Chamberlain, enchanting. Diane Chamberlain is an award-winning author of seventeen novels. She resides in North Carolina. Laurel Lockwood, due to post-partum depression and alcoholism, lost her son to the system. Returned at a year old, Laurel spent the rest of her life making up for her mistakes and being the best mom she could be to them. Her son, Andy has special needs and she hesitated to let him go to the church lock-in social. The church that night is consumed by fire, trapping the children and chaperones inside. Andy survives and manages to save others, as well. But the hero of the small town quickly turns into a suspect when some witnesses step forward and evidence is found tying him to the arson. Her daughter, Maggie has secrets of her own as the plot unfolds in this twisted investigation. Laurel finds herself asking how well she really knows her kids and how far she was willing to go to protect them. Taken in first person point of view, from several different sources, makes this book a compelling read. Normally first person is very difficult to make secondary characters stand out and be heard. But this book almost had no secondary characters, as each had a voice. The book also jumped from past to present, seeming as if you are reading two different stories at once. Typically when this is done, it makes the book drag out, but it only engaged me further. Doing this style also can be harder to follow, but that wasn¿t the case either. Diane Chamberlain is a mastermind at crimes of the soul. Before the Storm breaks your heart again and again with each chapter. Amongst this, the investigation is alluring and not at all predictable. There were a few twists the reader will see coming, but the way it was written you can¿t help but feel surprised anyhow. And whoa, the ones you don¿t see¿watch out. The characters were believable and relatable. It¿s hard to imagine they are fiction. Even down to the flaws you loved them, rooted for them. The plot flowed well, both the past and the present. I think most of all, I liked that the book was written without giving you a whole picture of the history of the characters or events. You had to learn both in pieces. Very intriguing. Before the Storm is a haunting, powerful, and mesmerizing story, sure to win the hearts of any audience. Kelly Moran Author and Reviewer

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 29, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    INTRIGUING! POWERFUL!

    Before the Storm is a riveting book and is a story that spans marriages, births, deaths, heartache, and betrayal; ultimately, that story demonstrates the strength and redemptive power of familial love.
    Haunting, intriguing and powerful!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    And The Plot Thickens...

    I read this book in one night {work the night shift}. I couldn't put it down until I found out every dirty little secret. There are so many twists and turns...you won't be disappointed with this book. I can't wait to read the follow-up.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    loved it

    This is the second Diane Chamberlain book I read. Before the Storm had me on the first page. I loved her introduction of each character and each character was just as important to the story as the next. Each character had a personality and as they were "built" I felt like I got to know them from all directions. The story was unusual and I learned a lot about the damage a devastating fire(including burn victims) would cause. Everything seem plausible in that regard. I couldn't wait to get to the third Chamberlain book, Secrets She Left Behind.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 16, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Great Read!

    I found Before the Storm, by Diane Chamberlain, enchanting. Diane Chamberlain is an award-winning author of seventeen novels. She resides in North Carolina .<BR/><BR/>Laurel Lockwood, due to post-partum depression and alcoholism, lost her son to the system. Returned at a year old, Laurel spent the rest of her life making up for her mistakes and being the best mom she could be to them. Her son, Andy has special needs and she hesitated to let him go to the church lock-in social. The church that night is consumed by fire, trapping the children and chaperones inside. Andy survives and manages to save others, as well. But the hero of the small town quickly turns into a suspect when some witnesses step forward and evidence is found tying him to the arson. Her daughter, Maggie has secrets of her own as the plot unfolds in this twisted investigation. Laurel finds herself asking how well she really knows her kids and how far she was willing to go to protect them.<BR/><BR/>Taken in first person point of view, from several different sources, makes this book a compelling read. Normally first person is very difficult to make secondary characters stand out and be heard. But this book almost had no secondary characters, as each had a voice. The book also jumped from past to present, seeming as if you are reading two different stories at once. Typically when this is done, it makes the book drag out, but it only engaged me further. Doing this style also can be harder to follow, but that wasn¿t the case either.<BR/><BR/>Diane Chamberlain is a mastermind at crimes of the soul. Before the Storm breaks your heart again and again with each chapter. Amongst this, the investigation is alluring and not at all predictable. There were a few twists the reader will see coming, but the way it was written you can¿t help but feel surprised anyhow. And whoa, the ones you don¿t see¿watch out. The characters were believable and relatable. It¿s hard to imagine they are fiction. Even down to the flaws you loved them, rooted for them. The plot flowed well, both the past and the present. I think most of all, I liked that the book was written without giving you a whole picture of the history of the characters or events. You had to learn both in pieces. Very intriguing. Before the Storm is a haunting, powerful, and mesmerizing story, sure to win the hearts of any audience.<BR/><BR/> <BR/><BR/>Kelly Moran<BR/><BR/>Author and Reviewer

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2008

    Great read!

    After reading The Secret Life of CeeCee Wilkes, I read Before the Storm, Diane Chamberlain's most recent novel. I thoroughly enjoyed both of them so much that I am now backtracking and reading others. I really liked the characters, family drama and suspense in Before the Storm. I highly recommend it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2008

    Captivating in more than one sense . . .

    I stepped into the pages of Before the Storm by Diane Chamberlain as my daughter born with fetal alcohol and adopted after the death of her birth mother was spiraling into the the abyss of mental health commitments and early adult transitioning challenges. Andy, born exposed prenatally to alcohol, captured my heart and as I watched my daughter toss and tumble into the realm of social services I found myself laying the book down for a moment to catch my breath and breath deeper to understand Laurel, Andy's mother - a very real character who unintentially left the sanity of a happy marriage and life at the birth of her first beautiful and intelligent daughter. She left through the door of undiagnosed post partum depression and filled the hole in her heart with a one night stand leading to the conception of her son, Andy, and a pregnancy filled with tasty wine coolers. I struggled with Laurel as she struggled with her alcoholism and depression knowing what she was creating, understanding the damage she was doing to the small person growing within, knowing with my own angst. I rejoiced in her rehabilitation and eventual reunification of the family. Life itself has many twists and turns and true to life, what often appears to be reality is only bits of truth. Before the Storm does justice to the work of families struggling with alcohol and its many outcomes. It does justrice to the reality of human frailty and interconnected relationships. I look forward to the sequel and hope Diane's work will add awareness of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder 'FASD' to those who need to know.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2008

    OUTSTANDING !!!

    One of the very best. The characters draws you into there lives, you feel there pain and love for one another. You don't want to let them go(i want to know more about maggie).

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2009

    Wonderful!

    I really enjoyed this book. I can't wait to get my hands on her other books!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Well Done Expose of Fetal Alcohol

    Diane's previous professional work shows through in the storyline and character develop. She does not hold back in structuring in reality and the twists and turns that can happen in real life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2008

    Amazing.

    I Love this book so much. Its a book that is hard to put down. I was up till midnight or later reading it. Had a wonderful plot and really shows the incredible bond between a mother and daughter. This book is one of my all time favorites for sure!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    another good one

    Another great story by Diane Chamberlain. It explores the nature of love, commitment, and belief in innocence.

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  • Posted February 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Winner - A Powerful Story!

    Another winner by Diane Chamberlain! This was one of her older books which I had not read, and it was on my upcoming Nook-e book list to be published on 2/26/13. Normally I am an e-reader; however, was fortunate to find a print copy and finished it before I had a chance to pre-order the e-book. This book should do very well as new e-book!

    Similar to the controversial topics of Jodi Picoult books (have read all her books) and being Diane is one of my favorite authors, could not wait to dive in. I had to get up at 5:30am to finish it as could not wait for the finale!

    The book takes you through the lows of Laura –postpartum depression, alcoholism, and (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder) FASD and the consequences of losing her children for a wakeup call and her struggles to find her way back. Along the way two brothers (Jamie and Marcus), best friend Sara, and the disability of Andy (her son) whom she lost years ago and a daughter whom she was not there for in the first years of her life. Combine it with arson, secrets from the past, and affairs---a page turner with a lot going on. Diane has a way of keeping the suspense coming throughout the book! I have purchased Secrets She Left Behind (Before the Storm #2) and look forward to the this powerful and compelling sequel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    Thought provoking!

    How far does a family go to protect one of their own? Written clearly and interestingly, this novel makes the reader think about his/her own values and relationships among family members. Goodread!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2012

    Attention gwtter Attention

    Had to keep reading

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Not Bad, but not her Best!

    After reading "The Secret Life of Cee Cee Wilkes" I was hooked on this author! This book, however, was not as intense and I was able to put it down, do some things and pick it up again. In this book Ms. Chamberlain skips from character to character with her chapters so you really have to stay in tune to what you are reading. I was able to finish the book and was eager to begin the sequal "Secrets She Left Behind". This book had the same chapter format, but was much more to Chamberlain's first book I had read and I liked it more.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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