Before They Were Cardinals: Major League Baseball in Nineteenth-Century St. Louis

Before They Were Cardinals: Major League Baseball in Nineteenth-Century St. Louis

by Jon David Cash
     
 

ISBN-10: 0826219357

ISBN-13: 9780826219350

Pub. Date: 03/31/2011

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

Mark McGwire, Ozzie Smith, Lou Brock. These famous Cardinals are known by baseball fans around the world. But who and what were the predecessors of these modern-day players and their team? In Before They Were Cardinals, Jon David Cash examines the infancy of major-league baseball in St. Louis during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. His in-depth

Overview

Mark McGwire, Ozzie Smith, Lou Brock. These famous Cardinals are known by baseball fans around the world. But who and what were the predecessors of these modern-day players and their team? In Before They Were Cardinals, Jon David Cash examines the infancy of major-league baseball in St. Louis during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. His in-depth analysis begins with an exploration of the factors that motivated civic leaders to form the city's first major-league ball club. Cash delves into the economic trade rivalry between Chicago and St. Louis and examines how St. Louis's attempt to compete with Chicago led to the formation of the St. Louis Brown Stockings in 1875. He then explains why, three years later, despite its initial success, St. Louis baseball quickly vanished from the big-league map.

St. Louis baseball was revived with the arrival of German immigrant saloon owner Chris Von der Ahe. Cash explains how Von der Ahe, originally only interested in concession rights, purchased a controlling interest in the Brown Stockings. His riveting account follows the team after Von der Ahe's purchase, from the formation of the American Association, to its merger in 1891 with the rival National League. He chronicles Von der Ahe's monetary downturn, and the club's decline as well, following the merger.

Before They Were Cardinals provides vivid portraits of the ball players and the participants involved in the baseball war between the National League and the American Association. Cash points out significant differences, such as Sunday games and beer sales, between the two Leagues. In addition, excerpts taken from Chicago and St. Louis newspapers make the on-field contests and off-field rivalries come alive. Cash concludes this lively historical narrative with an appendix that traces the issue of race in baseball during this period.

The excesses of modern-day baseball—players jumping contracts or holding out for more money, gambling on games, and drinking to excess; owners stealing players and breaking agreements—were all present in the nineteenth-century sport. Players were seen then, as they are now, as an embodiment of their community. This timely treatment of a fascinating period in St. Louis baseball history will appeal to both baseball aficionados and those who want to understand the history of baseball itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826219350
Publisher:
University of Missouri Press
Publication date:
03/31/2011
Series:
SPORTS & AMERICAN CULTURE Series
Pages:
296
Sales rank:
1,176,484
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
13 Years

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsix
Prologue: Fall Festivalxi
Introduction: Take Me Out to the Nineteenth-Century Ball Game1
Part IThe Rise and Fall of Major League Baseball in St. Louis, 1875-1877
1.St. Louis versus Chicago9
2."Champions of the West"26
3.The Collapse of the Original Brown Stockings38
Part IIThe Resurrection of Major League Baseball in St. Louis, 1878-1886
4.Beer and Baseball55
5.Von der Ahe versus Lucas78
6."Champions of the World"108
7."The $15,000 Slide"123
Part IIIThe Survival of Major League Baseball in St. Louis, 1887-1891
8.Farewell to Five "Old War Horses"151
9.Browns versus Bridegrooms171
10.War and Peace184
Epilogue: Farewell to Chris Von der Ahe, 1892-1899197
Appendix"Only Doing What Is Right": The Race Issue in Professional Baseball's Frontier Era201
Notes205
Bibliography263
Index273

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