BN.com Gift Guide

Beggars and Thieves: Lives of Urban Street Criminals [NOOK Book]

Overview

As the incidence of violent crime rises in the United States, so does the public demand for a solution. But what will work?
    Mark S. Fleisher has spent years among inmates in jails and prisons and on the streets with thieves, gang members, addicts, and life-long criminals in Seattle and other cities across the country. In Beggars and Thieves, he writes about how and why they become and remain offenders, and about the actual role of jails and prisons in efforts ...

See more details below
Beggars and Thieves: Lives of Urban Street Criminals

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$14.95 List Price

Overview

As the incidence of violent crime rises in the United States, so does the public demand for a solution. But what will work?
    Mark S. Fleisher has spent years among inmates in jails and prisons and on the streets with thieves, gang members, addicts, and life-long criminals in Seattle and other cities across the country. In Beggars and Thieves, he writes about how and why they become and remain offenders, and about the actual role of jails and prisons in efforts to deter crime and rehabilitate criminals. Fleisher shows, with wrenching firsthand accounts, that parents who are addicts, abusers, and criminals beget irreversibly damaged children who become addicts, abusers, and criminals. Further, Fleisher contends that many well-intentioned educational and vocational training programs are wasted because they are offered too late to help. And, he provides sobering evidence that many youthful and adult offenders find themselves better off in prison—with work to do, medical care, a clean place to sleep, regular meals, and stable social ties—than they are in America’s cities.
    Fleisher calls for anti-crime policies that are bold, practical, and absolutely imperative. He prescribes life terms for violent offenders, but in prisons structured as work communities, where privileges are earned through work in expanded, productive industries that reduce the financial burden of incarceration on the public. But most important, he argues that the only way to prevent street crime, cut prison growth, and reduce the waste of money and human lives is to permanently remove brutalized children from criminal, addicted, and violent parents.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An ethnographic study of street criminals in Seattle and other cities, focusing on familial factors that contribute to the social, cognitive, and emotional traits typical among street criminals. The study finds that their lives all began with brutal treatment from bad parents, and reiterates the need for intervention to protect children. First-hand accounts make the study interesting to general readers as well as students and professionals in sociology and criminal justice. Includes a glossary of street terms. Paper edition (unseen), $16.95. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Janet St. John
Fleisher's years of fieldwork spent interviewing inmates and addicts in Seattle and other cities, as well as his experience as a prison administrator, culminate here in an attempt to offer explanations and possible solutions to the ever-increasing crime in America. Fleisher's interviews and firsthand exposure reveal street criminals raised in dysfunctional families, perpetuating cycles of neglect, abuse, and criminal behavior. Although this is no startling discovery, Fleisher's argument that education is a too-late solution is daring and probably true. He demonstrates how prisons often act as havens for potential criminals who get medical care, regular meals, and shelter--more than they would have out on the streets. One of Fleisher's primary solutions envisions prisons as work communities (such as the Prison Blues denim company), where privileges are earned and the prison makes money toward supporting the inmates, relieving some public expense. The gritty accounts in this book are engaging enough, but with the addition of Fleisher's well-thought-out, realistic proposals for change, it becomes more than another urban crime lament.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780299147730
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/1995
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Mark S. Fleisher is associate professor of criminal justice at Illinois State University.  An anthropologist and a former administrator in the Federal Bureau of Prisons, he is the author of Warehousing Violence. He is also the author of Dead End Kids, published by the University of Wisconsin Press.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction 3
1 Street Ethnography 20
2 Distorted Families 78
3 Adolescent Survival 108
4 Sanctuaries 157
5 The Street 184
6 Aging 217
7 Ethnography and Anti-Crime Policy 241
Notes 273
Glossary 287
References 293
Index 325
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)