Beggars In Spain

Beggars In Spain

4.2 26
by Nancy Kress
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

PLEASE NOTE: This is the original novella which won the Hugo and Nebula awards.

Leisha Camden is a genetically engineered 'Sleepless.'

Her ability to stay awake all the time has not only made her more productive, but the genetic modifications have also given the 'Sleepless' a higher IQ and may even make them immortal.

Are they the future of humanity? Or will

Overview

PLEASE NOTE: This is the original novella which won the Hugo and Nebula awards.

Leisha Camden is a genetically engineered 'Sleepless.'

Her ability to stay awake all the time has not only made her more productive, but the genetic modifications have also given the 'Sleepless' a higher IQ and may even make them immortal.

Are they the future of humanity? Or will the small community of 'sleepless' be hunted down as freaks by a world that has grown wary of its newest creation?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612420578
Publisher:
Arc Manor
Publication date:
10/15/2011
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
100
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.24(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Beggars in Spain 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
4269512 More than 1 year ago
The first part of this novel (not the novella by the same name) is pretty good, with a thought provoking ending. However, I couldn't finish the rest of the book, even though I tried a dozen times. Important things happened without a leadup, and Leisha's response to critical events and other characters is muted, pretty much unemotional. A former lover marries someone else? Leisha's response is hohum. Her current lover dumps her? Oh well. An important event happens to Joey who is never mentioned before the event, so the reader doesn't really care about Joey. Most of the Sleepers are stupid and evil, one dimensional. I'm not a lawyer, but if the trial was based on US law, even I could tell that both lawyers should have been disbarred. All in all, the book tries to address important problems of racism and class distinction. But without the buildup to events and without character development, it comes off as a boring disappointment and a waste of money.
Petoht More than 1 year ago
The beginning felt quite rushed (probably due to its novella roots), but it was a very interesting read. Equally critical of collectivism and objectivism (and the odd blending of the two), it was an enjoyable read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The social concepts of freedom and equality are challenged anew in this novel--genetic engineering has upped the ante significantly in Kress's fantastic blockbuster. Orwellian/Randian concepts woven in with Abraham Lincoln's statements about the nature of freedom, all set in a technologically plausible future society--Bravo!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EffieTX More than 1 year ago
What an absolutely great science fiction story this turned out to be. Loved it and highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is thought provoking. I wonder about what eveloutionary stage are researchers going to do next and I ask is this next? Maybe not I hope.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first read `Beggars in Spain¿ six or seven years ago and I enjoyed it then. I¿ve found that the better stories age well; come back a few years later and they still engage your heart and your mind. This is one of those stories. Nancy Kress illustrates a fast approaching issue ¿ the impact of genetic engineering ¿ with well-drawn characters in realistic situations. The premise is science has learned how to engineer humans such that they no longer need to sleep. Obviously, the ¿sleepless¿ have a huge advantage over the ¿sleepers,¿ and Kress explores the chasm that develops between the two classes of humans. Not to give away the story, but the ¿sleepless¿ have additional gifts that notch up the intensity significantly. My only complaint is that the story seems to run out of gas toward the end. Kress has ably developed the issues, but doesn¿t bring the plot to a definitive climax. Nevertheless, `Beggars in Spain¿ is an excellent story, one that will stay with you over the years.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great book, reminiscent of Heinlein or Ayn Rand in that it intermixes philosophic concepts with great characters and action. It's done well - really well. Neat concept, good characters, a sense of history - and its not a rehash of stuff that I've read before. All in all a step above the pulp fiction I normally wallow in. Wow!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
then gave up after 90 pages. If you are not a fan of Ayn Rand, or don't enjoy page after page of objectivist propaganda, then this is not for you.