Beggars of Life

Beggars of Life

4.0 1
by Jim Tully
     
 

ISBN-10: 1606350005

ISBN-13: 2901606350002

Pub. Date: 06/07/2010

Publisher: Kent State University Press

Beggars of Life is Jim Tully’s classic autobiographical “novel” about the life of hobos and road-kids riding the rails in early 20th century America.
Jim Tully has largely been forgotten today, but during the 1920s and 1930s he was considered one of America’s best writers, routinely ranked with Hemingway and Fitzgerald as a true…  See more details below

Overview

Beggars of Life is Jim Tully’s classic autobiographical “novel” about the life of hobos and road-kids riding the rails in early 20th century America.
Jim Tully has largely been forgotten today, but during the 1920s and 1930s he was considered one of America’s best writers, routinely ranked with Hemingway and Fitzgerald as a true American voice. Beggars of Life is a true lost classic of American literature.
This Ring eBooks edition of this forgotten American classic is DRM free and contains additional information the 1928 film version of Beggars of Life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901606350002
Publisher:
Kent State University Press
Publication date:
06/07/2010
Edition description:
NE
Pages:
336

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Beggars of Life 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As publisher of the on-line journal Americana, I am always on the lookout for what a poet has called 'the pure products' of this country. Jim Tully is such a one. His short fiction was initially published in H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan's American Mercury. Tully's Beggars of Life was a best-seller in 1924, and was successfully dramatized and presented on Broadway as 'Outside Looking In' during the following year. Those who are enamored of reading about the life of hoboes and people who rode the rails may find this will be one of their favorite books. Tully writes in a spartan but never perfunctory style, and pulls no punches in recounting the graphic details of his rugged life on the road. From 1927 to 1932 he followed this book with four additional volumes touching upon his life and hard times: Circus Parade, Shanty Irish, Shadows of Men and Laughter In Hell. The first and third of these are the best. He also writes well about boxers in his first novel, 'Jarnegan,' cited below. From time to time he resembles a thoroughly unironic Ring Lardner, and one might fault him for a certain sentimentality which keeps his work from the top rank, but I've come across no better accounts of hoboing than his.