The Beginner's Guide to Walking the Buddha's Eightfold Path [NOOK Book]

Overview

“Writing a ‘nuts and bolts’ guide that is genuinely wise, charmingly conversational, and a pleasure to read requires a particular talent, and Jean Smith has proved once again that she has it.”—Sylvia Boorstein, author of Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There

The third of Jean Smith’s Beginner’s Guides focuses on the Buddha’s Eightfold Path—the concepts central to practicing the Buddha’s teachings in daily life. The eight steps on the path are: ...
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The Beginner's Guide to Walking the Buddha's Eightfold Path

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Overview

“Writing a ‘nuts and bolts’ guide that is genuinely wise, charmingly conversational, and a pleasure to read requires a particular talent, and Jean Smith has proved once again that she has it.”—Sylvia Boorstein, author of Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There

The third of Jean Smith’s Beginner’s Guides focuses on the Buddha’s Eightfold Path—the concepts central to practicing the Buddha’s teachings in daily life. The eight steps on the path are: right understanding, thought, speech, action, livelihood, effort, mindfulness, and concentration. Smith explains exactly what the Buddha had in mind, using translations of his own words and then elucidating them for us. Throughout the book are wonderful quotes from a broad range of Buddhist teachers, giving a taste of the very best each of them has to offer. The Beginner’s Guide to Walking the Buddha’s Eightfold Path is a prescription for happiness, not just for overcoming suffering, which is how many people think of Buddhism. Here is a book for Buddhists of every tradition.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307421814
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/18/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 203,626
  • File size: 473 KB

Meet the Author

Jean Smith is the author of The Beginner’s Guide to Zen Buddhism, the coauthor of The Beginner’s Guide to Insight Meditation, and the editor of four much-admired collections of Buddhist teachings: Breath Sweeps Mind, Everyday Mind, Radiant Mind, and 365 Zen. She lives in Keene, New York, and Taos, New Mexico.


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Read an Excerpt

Right Understanding

During the late 1980s visitors to New York City's Times Square were surprised and puzzled to observe, among all the flashing neon lights, the enormous words protect me from what I want, center stage on the Spectacolor marquee above them. When artist Jenny Holzer installed this slogan-one of her personal "truisms," about how advertising elicits desire for things we do not need and may not even want-intentionally or not she was making a compelling comment on the Buddha's Four Noble Truths and the barrier to happiness that each of us encounters.

Teachings

The first step of the Eightfold Path--right understanding, also called right view--like many spiritual conditions, emerged from the personal experiences of one individual, in this case the man we know as the Buddha ("Awakened One"). The historical Buddha was born Siddhartha Gautama, a prince of the Sakya clan (Shakyamuni Buddha), in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal in the sixth century b.c.e. Before his birth, a seer had foretold that the child would grow up to be either a great ruler or a great holy man, and his father did everything possible to ensure that Siddhartha would actualize the first possibility rather than the second and succeed him as the chief of the clan. Siddhartha was exposed to continuous sense pleasures while being shielded from anything unpleasant that might divert him from the course his father had set for him. Nevertheless, as an adult, on each of four outings from the palace, Siddhartha had an experience that stunned him. He encountered, for the first time in his life, a very sick person, a very old person, mourners around a person who had died, and an ascetic holy man, a sadhu. Each time, Siddhartha asked his charioteer what he was seeing, and he was shocked to learn that illness, old age, and death are inescapably part of the human condition-including his own-and that there are spiritual seekers questioning just what it means to be born into this human body and to have to endure such suffering.

At the age of twenty-nine, Siddhartha renounced his lavish life, left his family, and sought the meaning of human life among the greatest teachers of northern India as an ascetic who sometimes, it is said, ate only one grain of rice a day. His quest and his subsequent teachings were rooted in their yogic traditions, in which individuals renounced life as householders in order to seek spiritual truth. After six years he realized that he could no more Wnd spiritual answers by living a life of stark deprivation than through princely self-indulgence, and he embraced what has come to be known as the Middle Way between such extremes. On the night of the full moon in May on his thirty-fifth birthday, Siddhartha sat beneath a bodhi (fig) tree near Bodhgaya, in northern India, and vowed not to get up until he had achieved full enlightenment. Over the course of that night, he experienced all the temptations to which the mind is vulnerable, saw human suffering over many lifetimes, and came to understand the Four Noble Truths as well as the law of karma (causality), the impermanence of all conditioned things, and the absence of an autonomous and permanent self.


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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction to the Eightfold Path 1
1 Right Understanding 8
The Four Noble Truths 10
Impermanence, Emptiness, and Nonself 17
Karma 19
Dukkha: Pain Is Inevitable, but Suffering Is Optional 21
Impermanence: Aging, Illness, and Death 27
Karma: Living Between Generations 36
2 Right Thought 42
Renunciation or Sacrifice? 45
Thoughts Are Not Facts 46
Feelings Are Not Facts Either 51
3 Right Speech 62
Dishonesty Is the Worst Policy 65
Slander: Building Ourselves Up by Putting Others Down 67
Gossip: The Less Said, the Better 69
Harsh Language: Whom Does It Hurt? 71
Listening as Right Speech 74
Silence May Be Golden - or Silence May Be Yellow 75
Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is 77
Walking the Walk by Talking the Talk 78
4 Right Action 79
The Refrain from Killing or Harming Living Beings 86
To Refrain from Taking What Is Not Given Freely 95
To Refrain from Sexual Misconduct 104
To Refrain from Misusing Intoxicants That Dull Mindfulness 109
5 Right Livelihood 111
Work: "I Am What I Do" vs. "I Do What I Do" 113
Work: "What Do I Do?" 115
Wealth: "I Am Not What I Have Either" 122
"Spending" Time 125
Giving Time 127
6 Right Effort 132
Restraint and Abandoning of the Unwholesome 140
Development and Preservation of the Wholesome 144
You Don't Have to Do It Alone 145
7 Right Mindfulness 151
Contemplation of the Body 154
Contemplation of Feelings 158
Contemplation of Mind 158
Contemplation of Mind-Objects 159
Contemplation of the Body 163
Contemplation of Feelings 172
Contemplation of Mind 173
Contemplation of Mind-Objects 174
8 Right Concentration 178
Insight Meditation Techniques 184
Zen Buddhist Meditation Techniques 190
Tibetan Buddhist Meditation Techniques 195
Meditation on the Brahma-viharas 201
Hindrances to Meditation 208
The Whole Picture 213
Works Cited and Suggested Readings 215
Glossary of Selected Terms in Buddhism 221
Index 231
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