Beginning Android 2

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Overview

The Android development platform, created by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, is a platform in its truest sense, encompassing hundreds of classes beyond the traditional Java classes and open source components that ship with the SDK.

With Beginning Android 2, you’ll learn how to develop applications for Android 2.x mobile devices, using simple examples that are ready to run with your copy of the software development kit. Author, Android columnist, writer, developer, and ...

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Beginning Android 2

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Overview

The Android development platform, created by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, is a platform in its truest sense, encompassing hundreds of classes beyond the traditional Java classes and open source components that ship with the SDK.

With Beginning Android 2, you’ll learn how to develop applications for Android 2.x mobile devices, using simple examples that are ready to run with your copy of the software development kit. Author, Android columnist, writer, developer, and community advocate Mark L. Murphy will show you what you need to know to get started programming Android applications, including how to craft graphical user interfaces, use GPS, and access web services.

What you’ll learn

  • Discover Android and how to use it to build Java-based mobile applications for a wide range of phones and other devices.
  • Create user interfaces using both the Android widget framework and the built-in WebKit-powered Web browser components.
  • Utilize the distinctive capabilities of the Android engine, including location tracking, maps, and Internet access.
  • Use and create Android applications incorporating activities, services, content providers, and broadcast receivers.
  • Support Android 1.5, 1.6, and 2.0 devices, including dealing with multiple Android OS versions, multiple screen sizes, and other device-specific characteristics.

Who this book is for

This book is aimed at people new to mobile development, but with some knowledge of Java.

Table of Contents

  1. The Big Picture
  2. Projects & Targets
  3. Creating a Skeleton Application
  4. Using XML-Based Layouts
  5. Employing Basic Widgets
  6. Working with Containers
  7. Using Selection Widgets
  8. Getting Fancy With Lists
  9. Employing Fancy Widgets and Containers
  10. The Input Method Framework
  11. Applying Menus
  12. Fonts
  13. Embedding the WebKit Browser
  14. Showing Pop-Up Messages
  15. Dealing with Threads
  16. Handling Activity Lifecycle Events
  17. Creating Intent Filters
  18. Launching Activities and Sub-Activities
  19. Handling Rotation
  20. Working with Resources
  21. Using Preferences
  22. Managing and Accessing Local Databases
  23. Accessing Files
  24. Leveraging Java Libraries
  25. Communicating via the Internet
  26. Using a Content Provider
  27. Building a Content Provider
  28. Requesting and Requiring Permissions
  29. Creating a Service
  30. Invoking a Service
  31. Alerting Users Via Notifications
  32. Accessing Location-Based Services
  33. Mapping with MapView and MapActivity
  34. Handling Telephone Calls
  35. Development Tools
  36. Handling Multiple Screen Sizes
  37. Dealing with Devices
  38. Handling Platform Changes
  39. Where Do We Go From Here?
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781430226291
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 3/19/2010
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Murphy is the founder of CommonsWare and the author of The Busy Coder's Guide to Android Development. A three-time entrepreneur, his experience ranges from consulting on open source and collaborative development for Fortune 500 companies to application development on just about anything smaller than a mainframe. He has been a software developer for over 25 years, working on platforms ranging from the TRS-80 to the latest crop of mobile devices. A polished speaker, Mark has delivered conference presentations and training sessions on a wide array of topics internationally. Mark writes the "Building Droids" column for AndroidGuys and the "Android Angle" column for NetworkWorld. Outside of CommonsWare, Mark has an avid interest in how the Internet will play a role in citizen involvement with politics and government. He is a contributor to the Rebooting America essay collection, and his personal blog features many posts discussing "cooperative democracy."
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 6, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Introduction

    I bough Beginning Android 2 together with Pro Android 2. The first thing to notice is that Beginning is about half the size of Pro.

    Both books have a certain overlap but also unique parts. For example <string-arrays> are only described in Beginning. But on the other hand that description is pretty short.

    As it is I frequently find myself looking up a specific in both books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 26, 2010

    Could be worse

    It definitely got me started with Android, but in many cases it does more to confuse than anything else due to errors and omissions in the book.

    In most code examples, the example is missing one or more key parts of the source that prevent it from working as-is. I even found an instance in Chapter 7 where the XML layout file described did not even contain components that the java source file references. Obviously this book was shoved out quickly without much attention to detail.

    If you are an accomplished developer who already knows Java very well, you'll like work around those issues quickly. If you're just starting on Java or only know the basics, this book is likely to do more harm than good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted July 4, 2010

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    Posted September 1, 2010

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    Posted January 28, 2011

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    Posted January 23, 2011

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