Beginning Apache Struts: From Novice to Professional

Overview

Beginning Apache Struts will provide you a working knowledge of Apache Struts 1.2. This book is ideal for you Java programmers who have some JSP familiarity, but little or no prior experience with Servlet technology.

Organized in a condensed tutorial and lab format, the material in this book has been tested in real classroom environments. It takes a step-by-step, hands-on approach to teaching you Struts. The book even previews the next generation of Struts, the Apache Shale. The...

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Paperback (2006)
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Overview

Beginning Apache Struts will provide you a working knowledge of Apache Struts 1.2. This book is ideal for you Java programmers who have some JSP familiarity, but little or no prior experience with Servlet technology.

Organized in a condensed tutorial and lab format, the material in this book has been tested in real classroom environments. It takes a step-by-step, hands-on approach to teaching you Struts. The book even previews the next generation of Struts, the Apache Shale. The overall result is that you can quickly apply Struts to your work settings with confidence.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590596043
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 2/24/2006
  • Series: Beginning: from Novice to Professional Series
  • Edition description: 2006
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 536
  • Sales rank: 1,332,388
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Arnold Doray is Thinksquared's lead software architect and has been developing software professionally for over a decade. He has conducted several developer training courses in the U.K. and Singapore. Arnold holds a bachelor's degree in physics and a master's degree in knowledge engineering.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction 3
Ch. 2 Servlet and JSP review 7
Ch. 3 Understanding scopes 17
Ch. 4 Custom tags 23
Ch. 5 The MVC design pattern 37
Ch. 6 Simple validation 53
Ch. 7 Processing business logic 67
Ch. 8 Basic struts tags 79
Ch. 9 Configuring struts 93
Ch. 10 More tags 107
Ch. 11 Uploading files 129
Ch. 12 Internationalization 143
Ch. 13 Review lab : editing contacts in LILLDEP 157
Ch. 14 Tiles 161
Ch. 15 The validator framefork 195
Ch. 16 Dynamic forms 221
Ch. 17 Potpourri 239
Ch. 18 Review lab : the collection facility 267
Ch. 19 Developing plug-ins 277
Ch. 20 JavaServer faces and struts shale 307
App. A Frameworks for the model 359
App. B Commonly used classes 375
App. C Struts tag reference 381
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2006

    detailed explanation of Struts

    Doray gives you a good and very detailed explanation about programming in Apache Struts. He points out upfront that Struts sits roughly midway in functionality between PHP and Ajax, where in going from PHP to Ajax, we are moving in the direction of increasing desktop functionality. This will be useful to some readers, in helping to determine if Struts is a suitable choice for your project. Plus, the book shows how the powerful Model-View-Controller division of functionality can be done in Struts. If you have never used MVC before, in any context, then learning it here is inherently useful, irrespective of Struts. Also, MVC is an example of a design pattern perhaps one of the most important. The concept of an abstract design pattern is also of vital importance to a programmer. There are some minor issues with the text. Another reviewer pointed out that Chapter 2 refers to 'WebLogic from IBM'. Opps! More seriously, Chapter 4 refers repeatedly to loading code from a CD-ROM. What CD-ROM is this? Did I miss its definition earlier in the book? Or was there a definition? Another limitation is the restriction to Java 1.4. Increasingly awkward as time goes on, if not right now, because Java 1.5 has been out for over a year. We can expect more Java programmers to migrate to 1.5, and new programmers to start at 1.5. (Or subsequent versions.) One immediate consequence of the restriction to 1.4 is given in Chapter 2, where it advises you to install Tomcat. But you should not use any version higher than 5.0.x, because those use Java 1.5. This ceiling on Tomcat is not desirable either, as new versions of this often come out, and Tomcat has been at 5.5 for some time. Java 1.5 is essentially a superset of 1.4. It is unclear why the text restricts itself to 1.4. That should be explained in more detail. Better yet would be to remove the restriction.

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