Beginning Databases with PostgreSQL: From Novice to Professional

Overview

PostgreSQL is arguably the most powerful open-source relational database system. It has grown from academic research beginnings into a functionally-rich, standards-compliant, and enterprise-ready database used by organizations all over the world. And it?s completely free to use.

Beginning Databases with PostgreSQL offers readers a thorough overview of database basics, starting with an explanation of why you might need to use a database, and following with a summary of what ...

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Overview

PostgreSQL is arguably the most powerful open-source relational database system. It has grown from academic research beginnings into a functionally-rich, standards-compliant, and enterprise-ready database used by organizations all over the world. And it’s completely free to use.

Beginning Databases with PostgreSQL offers readers a thorough overview of database basics, starting with an explanation of why you might need to use a database, and following with a summary of what different database types have to offer when compared to alternatives like spreadsheets. You’ll also learn all about relational database design topics such as the SQL query language, and introduce core principles including normalization and referential integrity.

The book continues with a complete tutorial on PostgreSQL features and functions and include information on database construction and administration. Key features such as transactions, stored procedures and triggers are covered, along with many of the capabilities new to version 8. To help you get started quickly, step-by-step instructions on installing PostgreSQL on Windows and Linux/UNIX systems are included.

In the remainder of the book, we show you how to make the most of PostgreSQL features in your own applications using a wide range of programming languages, including C, Perl, PHP, Java and C#. Many example programs are presented in the book, and all are available for download from the Apress web site.

By the end of the book you will be able to install, use, and effectively manage a PostgreSQL server, design and implement a database, and create and deploy your own database applications.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590594780
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 4/7/2005
  • Series: The Expert's Voice in Open Source Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 664
  • Sales rank: 961,919
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Stones graduated from university with an electrical engineering degree, but decided software was more fun. He has programmed in a variety of languages, but only admits to knowing Visual Basic under duress. He has worked for a number of companies, from the very small to the very large, in a variety of areas, from real-time embedded systems upward. He is employed by Celesio AG as a systems architect, working principally on systems for the retail side of the business. He has co-authored several computing books with Neil Matthew, including Beginning Linux Programming, Professional Linux Programming, and Beginning Databases with MySQL.

Neil Matthew graduated with a degree in mathematics from the University of Nottingham in the U.K., and has been using and programming computers for over 30 years. Neil has used just about every flavor of UNIX since 1978, right up to today's Linux distributions. He has co-authored several computing books with Richard Stones, including Beginning Linux Programming, Professional Linux Programming, and Beginning Databases with MySQL.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction to PostgreSQL 1
Ch. 2 Relational database principles 17
Ch. 3 Getting started with PostgreSQL 43
Ch. 4 Accessing your data 73
Ch. 5 PostgreSQL command-line and graphical tools 113
Ch. 6 Data interfacing 149
Ch. 7 Advanced data selection 173
Ch. 8 Data definition and manipulation 201
Ch. 9 Transactions and locking 243
Ch. 10 Functions, stored procedures, and triggers 267
Ch. 11 PostgreSQL administration 309
Ch. 12 Database design 357
Ch. 13 Accessing PostgreSQL from C using libpq 385
Ch. 14 Accessing PostgreSQL from C using embedded SQL 419
Ch. 15 Accessing PostgreSQL from PHP 445
Ch. 16 Accessing PostgreSQL from Perl 465
Ch. 17 Accessing PostgreSQL from Java 491
Ch. 18 Accessing PostgreSQL from C# 517
App. A PostgreSQL database limits 543
App. B PostgreSQL data types 545
App. C PostgreSQL SQL syntax reference 551
App. D psql reference 573
App. E Database schema and tables 577
App. F Large objects support in PostgreSQL 581
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2005

    learn general SQL

    The book serves two audiences. One is those seeking to learn SQL. The other is those wanting to learn Postgresql. Naturally there is some overlap. But consider the first group. There are indeed several good texts on the theory of relational databases and using SQL to access and change these tables. But the books often deal at an abstract level that does not use a specific SQL implementation. Which makes it very hard to learn SQL. As a practical matter, you need to commit to an implementation, even just as a pedagogic decision. Well, as the authors explain, Postgresql is a good choice. It conforms broadly to SQL92 and is free open source. (The only other major free alternative being MySQL.) After all, you typically can't get onto a free copy of Oracle 10g or IBM's dB2 to learn from. So just from this standpoint, the book gives you a solid learning experience with SQL. Eminently transportable to a job involving a proprietary SQL, like those mentioned above. Of course, those have unique tweaks. But the methods described here are universal to the field. Now what you want to actually learn Postgresql? There are chapters on using it from the command line and so on. The book also devotes a chapter each to getting at Postgresql from C, PHP, Perl, Java and C#. Typically, you are unlikely to need all of these chapters. But it shows the flexibility of the database.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

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