Beginning Game Programming

( 1 )

Overview

If you are hooked on video games and have a basic knowledge of C++ and visual programming, you will be hooked on Beginning Game Programming. Clear, practical lessons based on C++ programming are the basis of this book's lessons. By focusing on the Windows API to construct games, you will learn game theory in double-buffered graphics, sprite animation, digitized sound effects and music. A fully functional game engine provided on CD, along with tools, code and graphics, will give you the ability to create your own ...

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Overview

If you are hooked on video games and have a basic knowledge of C++ and visual programming, you will be hooked on Beginning Game Programming. Clear, practical lessons based on C++ programming are the basis of this book's lessons. By focusing on the Windows API to construct games, you will learn game theory in double-buffered graphics, sprite animation, digitized sound effects and music. A fully functional game engine provided on CD, along with tools, code and graphics, will give you the ability to create your own games in the future. Learn the art and science of game programming with help from Beginning Game Programming.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672326592
  • Publisher: Sams
  • Publication date: 7/28/2004
  • Pages: 601
  • Sales rank: 816,541
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Morrison is a writer, developer, toy inventor and author of a variety of computer technology books and interactive Web-based courses. In addition to his primary profession as a writer and freelance nerd for hire, Michael is the creative lead at Stalefish Labs, an entertainment company he co-founded with his wife, Masheed. The first commercial debut for Stalefish Labs is a traditional social/trivia game called Tall Tales: The Game of Legends and Creative One-Upmanship (http://www.talltalesgame.com). When not glued to his computer, playing hockey, skateboarding or watching movies with his wife, Michael enjoys hanging out by his koi pond. You can visit Michael on the Web at http://www.michaelmorrison.com.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

I. GETTING STARTED.

1. Learning the Basics of Game Creation.

2. Creating an Engine for Games.

3. Learning to Draw Basic Graphics.

4. Drawing Graphical Images.

II. INTERACTING WITH GAME PLAYERS.

5. Controlling Games with the Keyboard and Mouse.

6. Example Game: Brainiac.

7. Improving Input with Joysticks.

8. Example Game: Light Cycles.

III. ANIMATING GAMES WITH SPRITES.

9. Making Things Move with Sprite Animation.

10. Managing a World of Sprites.

11. Example Game: Henway.

IV. MAKING NOISE WITH SOUND AND MUSIC.

12. Playing Digital Sound Effects.

13. Playing MIDI Music.

14. Example Game: Battle Office.

V. TAKING ANIMATION TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

15. Animating the Appearance of Sprites.

16. Creating Backgrounds for Your Sprites.

17. Example Game: Meteor Defense.

VI. ADDING BRAINS TO YOUR GAMES.

18. Teaching Games to Think.

19. Example Game: Space Out.

VII. SPICING UP YOUR GAMES.

20. Adding Pizzazz to Your Game with a Splash Screen.

21. Showing Off Your Game with Demo Mode.

22. Keeping Track of High Scores.

VIII. ONE FOR THE ROAD.

23. Changing Perspective with Scrolling Backgrounds.

24. Example Game: Stunt Jumper.

IX. APPENDIXES ON CD-ROM.

Appendix A: Selecting a Game Development Tool.

Appendix B: A C++ Programming Primer.

Appendix C: A Windows Game Programming Primer.

Appendix D: Creating Graphics for Games.

Index.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2004

    learn OO programming

    Morrison concentrates on showing how to write game programs for a personal computer, PDA or mobile phone. The first tends to have far more resources (memory, screen size...) than the others. But all 3 have the common feature of fairly open operating systems (even Microsoft Windows!), and you don't need specialised tools or licenses to build games. Essentially, given a good C++ compiler and a good game programming text (like this one), you can start designing and coding your own game. He quickly points out that the most important task in game design is playability. All the many technical items that necessarily take up the book's bulk are subordinated to this. If you follow his suggestions, one side effect of this book is that you can get a good grounding in object oriented programming (OOP). For newcomers to C++, OOP can seem a little abstract. But the coding of game elements as objects can make OOP come alive. Because of the very direct mapping of code to object; and enhanced by the strong visual feedback that is a natural part of the development process. By the way, all the games in the book use graphics in a two dimensional world. You don't get to reimplement a Doom-like three dimensional scenario because this is an introductory book. Going into even a simple three dimensional environment raises rendering issues and a level of maths beyond the scope of a first course.

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