Beginning Microsoft Visual C# 2008

( 1 )

Overview

The book is aimed at novice programmers who wish to learnprogramming with C# and the .NET framework. The book starts withabsolute programming basics. It then moves into Web and Windowsprogramming, data access (databases and XML), and more advancedtechnologies such as graphics programming with GDI+ and basicnetworking. The book is divided into sections including:

  • The C# Language: Basic language skills using consoleapplication. Content moves ...
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Overview

The book is aimed at novice programmers who wish to learnprogramming with C# and the .NET framework. The book starts withabsolute programming basics. It then moves into Web and Windowsprogramming, data access (databases and XML), and more advancedtechnologies such as graphics programming with GDI+ and basicnetworking. The book is divided into sections including:

  • The C# Language: Basic language skills using consoleapplication. Content moves from the absolute basics to fairlyinvolved OOP skills.
  • Windows Vista Programming: Using basic Windowsapplications, reinforcing earlier OOP and debugging skills.
  • Web Programming: Putting together basic Webapplications, highlighting differences between Web and Windowsprogramming.
  • Data Access: Accessing all kinds of data sources fromWeb and Windows applications, including SQL usage, XML, file systemdata, and Web Services.
  • Additional Techniques: "The fun stuff", includingWindows Presentation Foundation, Windows Workflow, WindowsCommunication Foundation, GDI+, networking, Windows Services, andso on.

The book makes complicated subjects seem easy to learn, and itinspires readers to investigate areas further on their own byproviding references to additional material, and exercise questionsthat require significant effort and personal research tocomplete.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470191354
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 4/28/2008
  • Series: Wrox Beginning Guides
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 1344
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Karli Watson is a freelance IT specialist, author, anddeveloper. He is also a technical consultant for 3form Ltd.(www.3form.net) and Boost.net (www.boost.net), and an associatetechnologist with Content Master (www.contentmaster.com). For themost part, he immerses himself in .NET (in particular, C#) and haswritten numerous books in the field. He specializes incommunicating complex ideas in a way that is accessible to anyonewith a passion to learn, and spends much of his time playing withnew technology to find new things to teach people.
During those rare times when he isn’t doing the above, Karliis probably wishing he were hurtling down a mountain on a snowboardor possibly trying to get his novel published. Either way,you’ll know him by his brightly colored clothes.

Christian Nagel is a software architect, trainer, andconsultant, and an associate of Thinktecture(www.thinktecture.com), offering training and coaching based onMicrosoft .NET technologies. His achievements in the developercommunity have earned him a position as Microsoft Regional Directorand MVP for ASP.NET. He enjoys an excellent reputation as an authorof several .NET books, such as Professional C#, Pro .NET NetworkProgramming, and Enterprise Services with the .NETFrameworks, and he speaks regularly at international industryconferences.
Christian has more than 15 years of experience as a developer andsoftware architect. He started his computing career on PDP 11 andVAX/VMS, covering a variety of languages and platforms. Since 2000,he has been working with .NET and C#, developing and architectingdistributed solutions. He can be reached atwww.christiannagel.com.

Jacob Hammer Pedersen is a systems developer at FujitsuService, Denmark. He’s been programming the PC since theearly 1990s using various languages, including Pascal, VisualBasic, C/C++, and C#. Jacob has co-authored a number of .NET booksand works with a wide variety of Microsoft technologies, rangingfrom SQL Server to Office extensibility. A Danish citizen, he worksand lives in Aarhus, Denmark.

Jon D. Reid is the director of systems engineering atIndigo Biosystems, Inc. (www.indigobio.com), an independentsoftware vendor for the life sciences, where he develops in C# forthe Microsoft environment. He has co-authored many .NET books,including Beginning Visual C# 2005, Beginning C# Databases: FromNovice to Professional, Pro Visual Studio .NET, ADO.NETProgrammer’s Reference, and Professional SQL Server2000 XML.

Morgan Skinner started programming at school in 1980 andhas been hooked on computing ever since. He now works for Microsoftas an application development consultant where he helps customerswith their architecture, design, coding, and testing. He’sbeen working with .NET since the PDC release in 2000, and hasauthored several MSDN articles and co-authored a couple of books on.NET. In his spare time he relaxes by fighting weeds on hisallotment. You can reach Morgan at www.morganskinner.com.

Eric White is an independent software consultant withmore than 20 years of experience in building management informationsystems and accounting systems. When he isn’t hunched over ascreen programming in C#, he is most likely to be found with an iceaxe in hand, climbing some mountain.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xxvii

Part I: The C# Language 1

Chapter 1: Introducing C# 3

Chapter 2: Writing a C# Program 13

Chapter 3: Variables and Expressions 31

Chapter 4: Flow Control 59

Chapter 5: More About Variables 93

Chapter 6: Functions 125

Chapter 7: Debugging and Error Handling 155

Chapter 8: Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming 185

Chapter 9: Defining Classes 209

Chapter 10: Defining Class Members 241

Chapter 11: Collections, Comparisons, and Conversions 277

Chapter 12: Generics 331

Chapter 13: Additional OOP Techniques 371

Chapter 14: C# 3.0 Language Enhancements 399

Part II: Windows Programming 431

Chapter 15: Basic Windows Programming 433

Chapter 16: Advanced Windows Forms Features 493

Chapter 17: Using Common Dialogs 537

Chapter 18: Deploying Windows Applications 583

Part III: Web Programming 625

Chapter 19: Basic Web Programming 627

Chapter 20: Advanced Web Programming 671

Chapter 21: Web Services 709

Chapter 22: Ajax Programming 739

Chapter 23: Deploying Web Applications 759

Part IV: Data Access 775

Chapter 24: File System Data 777

Chapter 25: XML 819

Chapter 26: Introduction to LINQ 849

Chapter 27: LINQ to SQL 895

Chapter 28: ADO.NET and LINQ over DataSet 933

Chapter 29: LINQ to XML 993

Part V: Additional Techniques 1017

Chapter 30: Attributes 1019

Chapter 31: XML Documentation 1049

Chapter 32: Networking 1075

Chapter 33: Introduction to GDI+ 1107

Chapter 34: Windows Presentation Foundation 1143

Chapter 35: Windows Communication Foundation 1215

Chapter 36: Windows Workflow Foundation 1247

Summary 1278

Index 1279

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Comprehensive .Net Introduction

    I am an IT manager who has studied BASIC, VB, C, and several 4GL's. I was looking for a grand tour of Microsoft's Dot Net toolset. This book is taking me through everything I need to know to get up and running on managed code and then into the specifics of web forms, windows forms, file and database access. Discussions of abstract concepts such as generics are clear and concise. This area is so rich in complexity, it takes a long time to get through all the chapters. I wish this were available as an ebook as with 1104 pages it is a lot to lug around.

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