Beginning .NET Game Programming in C#

( 2 )

Overview

This long-awaited title provides a clear introduction to game programming for you, C# programmers! Microsoft insiders have written an easy-to-read guide, so you can start programming games quickly. This book even includes an introduction to Managed DirectX 9, and other advanced .NET features, like animation and sounds.

Code examples are actually complete games, and include .Nettrix, .Netterpillars, River Pla.NET, Magic KindergarteN, D-iNfEcT, Nettrix II (for the Pocket PC), and ...

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Overview

This long-awaited title provides a clear introduction to game programming for you, C# programmers! Microsoft insiders have written an easy-to-read guide, so you can start programming games quickly. This book even includes an introduction to Managed DirectX 9, and other advanced .NET features, like animation and sounds.

Code examples are actually complete games, and include .Nettrix, .Netterpillars, River Pla.NET, Magic KindergarteN, D-iNfEcT, Nettrix II (for the Pocket PC), and a version of the classic game, Spacewars.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590593196
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 3/22/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 440
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Sometime around 1974, David Weller discovered a coin-operated Pong game in a pizza parlor in Sacramento, California, and was instantly hooked on computer games. A few years later, he was introduced to the world of programming by his godfather, who let him use his Radio Shack TRS-80 computer to learn about programming in BASIC. David's first program was a simple dice game that graphically displayed the die face (he still has the first version he originally wrote on paper). He quickly outgrew BASIC, though, and soon discovered the amazing speed you could get by writing video games in assembly language. He spent the remainder of his high school years getting bad grades, but writing cool software, none of which made him any money. He spent the next 10 years in the military, learning details about computer systems and software development. Shortly after he left the military, David was offered a job to help build the Space Station Training Facility for the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). From that point on, he merrily spent time working on visual simulation and virtual reality applications. He made the odd shift into multitier IT application development during the Internet boom, ultimately landing inside of Microsoft as a technical evangelist, where he spends time playing with all sorts of new technology and merrily saying under his breath, "I can't believe people pay me to have this much fun!"

Alexandre Lob�o is a passionate man. His first passion was reading, starting with large books�Mark Twain, �rico Ver�ssimo, Jules Verne, Monteiro Lobato, Alexandre Dumas, and others�when he was 7. At age�12, he discovered his next�two�passions: playing and creating games (by that time on his first Apple computer), and writing.

Many years later�he's about forty now�these passions still flourish. Now he's a teacher of academic game development courses, has written four books on the topic, and has participated in Brazilian gamse development contests, both as a contestant and as a judge. He has also written short story books, children's books, and young adult books, and in 2008 he released his first romance, The Name of the Eagle, currently available only�in Portuguese. And, of course, he still loves to read, some favorite authors being Ken Follett�and Paulo Coelho.

His ultimate passions�starting in 1995 and still burning�are his wife, Wal�ria, and his kids, Nat�lia and Rafael. Alexandre believes that lives needs passion to be lived entirely, and hopes that this book helps light this passion in readers' hearts. You can find his work at AlexandreLobao.com.

Ellen Hatton is a computer science undergraduate at Edinburgh University. She was exposed to computers at a very early age and has been fascinated with them ever since. Her first experience of computer games was playing Dread Dragon Doom, at which she quickly excelled at the age of 5. She's been hooked on games ever since.

Ellen is not only interested in computers. She skis frequently, among other sports, and enjoys general student life in the bustling Scottish capital, Edinburgh. As her choice of degree suggests, Ellen still finds computers very interesting and is constantly looking for new challenges.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
About the authors
About the technical reviewers
Credits
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction
Ch. 1 .Nettrix : GDI+ and collision detection 1
Ch. 2 .Netterpillars : artificial intelligence and sprites 65
Ch. 3 Managed DirectX first steps : Direct3D basics and DirectX vs. GDI+ 139
Ch. 4 Space donuts : sprites revisited 207
Ch. 5 Spacewar! 243
Ch. 6 Spacewar3D : meshes and buffers and textures, oh my! 269
Ch. 7 Adding visual effects to spacewar3D 325
Epilogue : taking your next steps 341
Bonus chapter : porting .Nettrix to Pocket PC 349
App. A Suggested reading 369
App. B Motivations in games 373
App. C How do I make games? 379
App. D Guidelines for developing successful games 389
Index 397
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2004

    goes through the basics

    In programming, one of the single biggest applications is games. The speed of a multigigahertz cpu, plus vast memory and disk space gives you a huge drawing board. Also, since games are a mass market, then you want to code for Microsoft PCs. In response, the authors show how Microsoft's .NET environment and C# programming within it can be used to make viable games. They start by conceding that the fastest twitch games, like Half Life 2 or Doom 3, can't really be effectively coded using the book's Direct X methods. But they point out that C# is certainly adequate for other types of games. The book walks you through very basic game algorithms. If you've programmed games before, many of these ideas will be familiar. Like the fundamentals of detection of collisions between 2 objects on the screen. Naturally, since visuals are crucial, space is devoted to constructing 3D objects and rendering them with various textures. Frankly, for the pure graphics, the book only touches on the algorithms. You will need another text devoted to the latter. But within the space constraints of this book, there is an admirable job of conveying how to write games in C#.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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