Beginning .NET Game Programming in VB .NET / Edition 1

Beginning .NET Game Programming in VB .NET / Edition 1

4.5 2
by David Weller, Alexandre Santos Lobao, Ellen Hatton
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590594010

ISBN-13: 9781590594018

Pub. Date: 09/20/2004

Publisher: Apress

This highly-anticipated title provides a clear introduction to game programming for VB .NET programmers! Microsoft insiders have written an easy-to-read guide, so you can start programming games quickly. This book even includes an introduction to Managed DirectX9, and other advanced .NET features, like animation and sounds.

Code examples are actually complete

Overview

This highly-anticipated title provides a clear introduction to game programming for VB .NET programmers! Microsoft insiders have written an easy-to-read guide, so you can start programming games quickly. This book even includes an introduction to Managed DirectX9, and other advanced .NET features, like animation and sounds.

Code examples are actually complete games, and include .Nettrix , .Netterpillars, River Pla.NET, Magic KindergarteN., D-iNfEcT, Nettrix II (for the Pocket PC), and a version of the classic game, Spacewars.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594018
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
09/20/2004
Edition description:
1st Corrected ed. 2004. Corr. 3rd printing 2004
Pages:
440
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.92(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Forewordxi
About the Authorsxiii
About the Technical Reviewerxv
Creditsxvi
Acknowledgmentsxvii
Prefacexix
Introductionxxi
Chapter 1.Nettrix: GDI+ and Collision Detection1
Basic GDI+ Concepts2
Performing Graphic Operations with a Graphics Object4
Creating Gradients7
Collision Detection8
Optimizing the Number of Calculations18
Extending the Algorithms to Add a Third Dimension22
The Game Proposal23
The Game Project25
The Coding Phase31
Final Version: Coding the GameField Class and the Game Engine51
Adding the Final Touches60
Summary64
Book Reference64
Chapter 2.Netterpillars: Artificial Intelligence and Sprites65
Object-Oriented Programming66
Artificial Intelligence69
Sprites and Performance Boosting Tricks76
The Game Proposal84
The Game Project86
The Coding Phase99
Adding the Final Touches135
Summary139
Chapter 3Managed DirectX First Steps: Direct3D Basics and DirectX vs. GDI+141
DirectX Overview142
3-D Coordinate Systems and Projections153
Drawing Primitives and Texture160
The Application Proposal168
The Application Project169
The Coding Phase170
Adding the Final Touches203
More About DirectX and GDI+205
Summary206
Acknowledgments206
Chapter 4Space Donuts: Sprites Revisited207
Sprites208
Space Donuts223
Summary243
Acknowledgments243
Chapter 5Spacewar!245
About Spacewar246
Methodology: Challenges of Working with Someone Else's Code248
Using the Application Wizard248
Direct Play261
Summary269
Acknowledgments269
Chapter 6Spacewar3D: Meshes and Buffers and Textures, Oh My!271
DirectX Basics: The Application Wizard Revisited272
Spacewar3D284
The Game Proposal285
The Game Project285
Summary326
Acknowledgments326
Chapter 7Adding Visual Effects to Spacewar3D327
Point Sprites327
Step 10: Adding Thrust Effects to Spacewar3D329
Step 11: Adding Explosion Effects to Spacewar3D337
Step 12: Adding a Shockwave Effect to Spacewar3D339
Summary341
Epilogue: Taking Your Next Steps343
Moving On343
Habits to Build344
Things We Neglected to Tell You348
Happy Trails350
Bonus Chapter Porting .Nettrix to Pocket PC351
Programming for Mobile Devices352
The Game Proposal356
The Game Project357
The Coding Phase358
Adding the Final Touches368
Summary369
Appendix ASuggested Reading371
Appendix BMotivations in Games375
Appendix CHow Do I Make Games?381
Appendix DGuidelines for Developing Successful Games391
Index399

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Beginning .NET Game Programming in VB .NET 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the authors, Weller, recently co-authored a sister book on .NET game programming using C#. Here, Weller and others direct their attention to using VB as a game language. Both books follow a broadly similar approach. Each shows how to access DirectX graphics calls via their chosen languages. For example, this book starts with a basic program in many games. How to recognise collisions between your objects? It shows how VB can be used to write object oriented code in simple fashion. And how .NET enables the code to use the underlying DirectX. The VB OO code is syntactically simpler than the corresponding C++, Java or C# code, though perhaps more verbose. Those of us who use these other languages now have to face the fact that yes, indeed, you can write decent OO code in VB. Another chapter shows what it calls Artifical Intelligence usage. I would just say these are more complex coding than earlier chapters. Game programming books often indulge in such puffery, independent of what languages they use. The book goes on to recapitulate common graphics ideas like textures and meshes, but all in VB. This is not really an algorithms book, so the treatment is more to show how to do it in VB, than a detailed exposition of the methods.