Beginning Object-Oriented Javascript

Overview

This book for beginning/intermediate JavaScript developers does not assume any prior knowledge of JavaScript. It introduces object-oriented programming and the basics of objects in JavaScript. It has a do-it-yourself approach to writing code, because writing code is the best way to really learn a programming language; it encourages readers to type code into Firebug's console, see how it works, and experiment with it. Each chapter ends with practice questions for review. JavaScript (ECMAScript) is the language of ...
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Overview

This book for beginning/intermediate JavaScript developers does not assume any prior knowledge of JavaScript. It introduces object-oriented programming and the basics of objects in JavaScript. It has a do-it-yourself approach to writing code, because writing code is the best way to really learn a programming language; it encourages readers to type code into Firebug's console, see how it works, and experiment with it. Each chapter ends with practice questions for review. JavaScript (ECMAScript) is the language of the web browser, the third pillar in today's paradigm that considers web pages should consist of clearly distinguishable parts: content (HTML), presentation (CSS), and behavior (JavaScript). JavaScript can be used to create desktop widgets, browser and application extensions, and other pieces of software as well as web pages; a chapter is dedicated to the web browser environment including DOM, events, and AJAX tutorials, but the rest is applicable to the other environments too.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847194145
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/24/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 356
  • Sales rank: 1,345,369
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Stoyan Stefanov is a Yahoo! web developer, Zend Certified Engineer, book author, and contributor to the international PHP community. He talks regularly about JavaScript, PHP, and other web development topics at conferences and his blog www.phpied.com and also runs a number of other sites, including www.JSPatterns.com - a site dedicated to exploring JavaScript patterns. Stoyan is the engineering lead of Yahoo's performance optimization tool YSlow, as well as other open-source tools and PEAR libraries.
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2008

    Excellent Book on OOP JavaScript

    Object-Oriented JavaScript by Stoyan Stefanov is a first among JavaScript books in my opinion. OOP in JavaScript is not new, but has gained much popularity since the use of JavaScript in Ajax and the development of JavaScript libraries and widgets from various web companies (especially Yahoo!). Learning how to create component-based applications using JavaScript is not an easy thing to master if all you know about JavaScript is doing ¿mouse-overs¿ or neat little effects. There really isn¿t a book out there that really explains how OOP works in JavaScript completely. There are books from Apress and WROX that are geared towards ¿intermediate¿ topics in JavaScript such as creating objects and so forth, but they quickly go into sing custom libraries which really doesn¿t teach you anything apart from using a library. This book really goes into detail in explaining how the syntax of JavaScript can be used to create scalable applications from the ground-up. I would say this book is geared for the developer who has a grasp on the language itself but wants to learn more in creating real useful applications for the web using JavaScript and wants to learn without depending on any pre-built library or component. The author goes into the basics of the language first (chapter 1-2) then spends a chapter on functions (chapter 3) which is the many ways in JavaScript to create objects. Since JavaScript is not a fully OO language, it can get confusing on understanding the many different ways to create an object. Stoyan explains it very well with many examples so anybody can understand it. The next few chapters (4 ¿ 6), the author goes into OOP practices like how objects work, the Prototype built-in object, inheritance, and many of the built-in methods and properties you can use to manipulate your custom objects. Yes, object literal notation is covered in-depth since it really is the standard way in JavaScript to create objects. The rest of the book has some excellent chapters on the BOM, DOM, Ajax and Design Patterns which really round out the book and make it worth it. I have never seen a book so complete on some of the more intermediate to advanced features of JavaScript and explaining it so anybody can learn it. Go get yourself a copy of this book today!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    The book is great for beginning to intermediate programmers who

    The book is great for beginning to intermediate programmers who want to start working in JavaScript. I found it made for pleasant, light reading without lacking in substance. It's full of general information and good tips explained easily enough that you can read it through and remember most of what you've read, but organized so that you can easily find details if you need to look them up later.

    It starts by explaining some of the basic concepts of working with JavaScript, what kinds of concepts the language follows, and how to work with data. JavaScript is full of pitfalls and corner cases that seem quite unpleasant to me, since I prefer more rigid languages that don't give you quite the degree of freedom that JavaScript does. If JavaScript is your first language, you might feel differently about a lot of the language's idiosyncracies. In either case, I felt that, after reading the book, I've been exposed to all of the major pitfalls that would have hit me otherwise. Even if I don't necessarily like them, I'll know how to deal with them in my own design or if I see them in other people's code.

    The beginning sections are also full of useful (sometimes idiosyncratic) shortcuts to getting things done in JavaScript. In the process, the author has some very nice explanations for things that can often be difficult to understand when people see them for the first time. I was particularly impressed by his descriptions of closures and callbacks. Although I've learned to work with both of these concepts over the years and have the feeling that I understand them thoroughly, I don't think I've ever seen either concept as well explained anywhere else. This is particularly important because JavaScript is a language where you can come across both quite frequently - especially callbacks implemented in the observer pattern.

    As the title says, the book is about object oriented JavaScript. If you're used to working with classical object oriented languages, you'll probably expect a lot of those standard concepts in JavaScript. That is not the case here - each object is a singleton, and inheritance is only one way of working with objects that you can implement. The book does a good job of showing all the possibilities available. I'm used to reading Java, C++, Python, etc., so I thought it was interesting to read how to implement classes in JavaScript and see some other patterns that you can come across in the language. At the end, though, I was surprised to see the author refer to a builtin function that does all the work of inheritance for you. Although I understand that he probably wanted to make sure that people got a taste of the JavaScript style before seeing a way of forcing the language to behave as they'd expect from other languages (something that you shouldn't do without understanding a bit more about how JavaScript deals with its objects if you want to avoid some hard-to-find bugs), I would have liked to see that more in the beginning. I still would have been interested in the theory behind it and also in alternative ways of implementing similar behavior. From a didactic standpoint, it would have allowed advanced users to see something they understand and can work with right away, without detracting from their ability to learn the other design possibilities. Beginners wouldn't have noticed the difference.

    After the main course, the desert was a few very applied chapters on web development. Not only did they demonstrate how to easily implement cool behavior in webpages, but also how to build your code so that it works robustly across browsers. I really enjoyed this section, but I would have enjoyed it more if it would have referred the user to some libraries that implement many common functions in webpages, such as jQuery.

    The appendix at the end is also quite useful, although it would have been helpful to have a section on browser capabilities or web development in general.

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  • Posted October 17, 2011

    Definitely one for the bookshelf or handy reference

    I bought this book to clear up a number of misconceptions I had with regard to OO JavaScript. It did so in spades. The book is definitely a must have reference!

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