Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies / Edition 2

Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies / Edition 2

3.4 8
by Barry Burd, S. Hayes
     
 

ISBN-10: 0764588745

ISBN-13: 9780764588747

Pub. Date: 04/04/2005

Publisher: Wiley

See why Java is a great place to start programming

Get the scoop on what goes into a program and how to build one that works

This Java won't keep you up nights, because you have this handy book to show you the ropes! It lays the groundwork for the whole programming experience, shows you how to get started with Java, takes you through creating your first

Overview

See why Java is a great place to start programming

Get the scoop on what goes into a program and how to build one that works

This Java won't keep you up nights, because you have this handy book to show you the ropes! It lays the groundwork for the whole programming experience, shows you how to get started with Java, takes you through creating your first programs, helps you solve programming problems, and even lets you in on some great tips.

Discover how to

  • Turn your instructions into code
  • Compile and run a program
  • Understand methods, classes, and objects
  • Use variables, values, and types
  • Work with Java "if" statements

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764588747
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/04/2005
Series:
For Dummies Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.24(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Part I: Getting Started with Java Programming 9

Chapter 1: Getting Started 11

Chapter 2: Setting Up Your Computer 23

Chapter 3: Running Programs 53

Part II: Writing Your Own Java Programs 75

Chapter 4: Exploring the Parts of a Program 77

Chapter 5: Composing a Program 97

Chapter 6: Using the Building Blocks: Variables, Values, and Types 121

Chapter 7: Numbers and Types 135

Chapter 8: Numbers? Who Needs Numbers? 153

Part III: Controlling the Flow 175

Chapter 9: Forks in the Road 177

Chapter 10: Which Way Did He Go? 193

Chapter 11: How to Flick a Virtual Switch 217

Chapter 12: Around and Around It Goes 233

Chapter 13: Piles of Files: Dealing with Information Overload 253

Chapter 14: Creating Loops within Loops 273

Chapter 15: The Old Runaround 285

Part IV: Using Program Units 309

Chapter 16: Using Loops and Arrays 311

Chapter 17: Programming with Objects and Classes 333

Chapter 18: Using Methods and Variables from a Java Class 347

Chapter 19: Creating New Java Methods 371

Chapter 20: Oooey GUI Was a Worm 393

Part V: The Part of Tens 423

Chapter 21: Ten Websites for Java 425

Chapter 22: Ten Useful Classes in the Java API 427

Index 431

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Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Psoup More than 1 year ago
Posted 5/5/2010: I am a professional developer (in many languages other than Java). I have programmed in Java previously but as in any tool if you do not use it you will lose it. I lost it! I have found some of the Java terminology to be intimidating but programming all follows the same rules. Java is no exception. The way Barry wrote the book he was speaking to each reader in a way they can understand and with humor. I wish I had the opportunity to take a class that Barry teaches. Wanting to brush up on my Java and learn new techniques this book does it all. I am completely satisfied and ready to use Java in real business applications.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm currently evaluating this book as a possible textbook for a light class in introductory programming using Java at the high school level. Aside from working through it myself, I'm having a student act as a 'guinea pig' to give me their evaluation of it. The book is written in a style that's fun to read, and it provides good descriptions for a beginning programmer. There are enough programming projects in it to demonstrate the points in the book and keep the text from becoming long, slogging infodumps. There are many areas that are glossed over, but that's necessary at this level and I don't consider it a flaw. They've done well. It shares the flaw of many beginning programming books of limiting the examples to non-graphical apps for far too long, in my opinion. The book's real flaw, however, is the use of a platform-specific IDE from the very start. Using a platform-specific IDE with Java is outrageous, IMO. The examples are given with step-by-step programming instructions tied directly to this IDE, so any student who can't or doesn't use this IDE will be at a big disadvantage early on. The flaw can be overcome if the reader has some help from someone else, or the patience to figure out the relationship between the book's instructions for its IDE and what they are using. But if you're working on your own on a platform other than Windows, it could be a big problem. I'd much rather have seen this book using a standard multiplatform IDE like Eclipse or Netbeans with setup info to simplify the interfaces for a beginner. Still, the tone and style of the book and the fine examples are the saving graces of it. If you're starting out on Windows, I highly recommend this book, but I also recommend moving yourself to a standard IDE as soon as you feel competant to do so. If you're starting out on a Mac or Linux, this book will still work but there'll be a rough bump near the start while you set yourself up with Eclipse or Netbeans and learn to equate the directions in the book with your IDE. Fortunately, the Apple Developer Connection and Linux HOWTOs give good info that will get you started, substituting for the first few chapters of this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A "Beginning" book, and that's about as far as it goes. Several of the sample programs do not work with Java 7. The author spends too much time attempting to develop cute and humorous analogies; making the sample programs difficult to understand. Most readers won't need the five paragraph description (Chapter 15) of the author's visits to his Aunt Edna as an introduction to Java's For statements. The opening paragraphs of Chapter 20, "Oooey GUI Was a Worm" are insulting, and made this reader feel like a dummy for having bought the book in the first place. Save your money, and use the free Java on-line tutorials.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The author tries so hard to be funny that he really does a terrible job of explaining the material. His analogies to explain the workings of Java are rediculous and simply strange, which leave the reader confused. I found a great intoduction to Java as an Android App that's well organized, down to earth, and free. This book is not for dummies, its written by dummies.