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Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies
     

Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies

4.1 8
by Barry A. Burd
 

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Computers are so much a part of our daily lives that many of us take them for granted. You turn on your PC, connect to the Internet and check your stocks, your e-mail, or the weather report, write a note to Grandma, or relax for half an hour by shooting make-believe lasers at make-believe aliens. But if you ever wonder “how do they make a computer do that?”

Overview

Computers are so much a part of our daily lives that many of us take them for granted. You turn on your PC, connect to the Internet and check your stocks, your e-mail, or the weather report, write a note to Grandma, or relax for half an hour by shooting make-believe lasers at make-believe aliens. But if you ever wonder “how do they make a computer do that?” then you may be a candidate for Beginning Programming with Java™ For Dummies®.

If you’re ready to take the plunge into programming, Java is a wonderful place to start.

You can write Java code for any operating system. A cool device called the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) will translate your code so it can be understood by your Windows system, your neighbor’s Mac, or your nerdy cousin’s Unix box.  Java is a good place to begin learning programming. And not only can programming be fun, it can also be a lucrative career.

Author Barry Burd breaks down Java programming into fun and manageable bites – or bytes. He walks you through downloading and setting up the Java compiler, JVM, and Java API, and then away you go!  You’ll be able to

  • Explore the parts of a program
  • Discover methods, variables, values, and types
  • Find out how the computer turns your program into the zeros and ones it understands
  • See how your computer makes decisions and how your program directs its choices
  • Create loops, use arrays, and program with objects and classes
  • Translate the mysteries of some common error messages – and fix the problems they reveal

Once you discover the joys of Java programming, you just might find you’re hooked. You’ll be able to make that machine do your bidding, at least some of the time. You may find yourself thinking of programming like a game of strategy, in which it’s up to you to find the secret passageway, decipher the magic words, and save the princess. Sound like fun?  Here’s the place to start.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764526466
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/04/2003
Series:
For Dummies Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
7.42(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.97(d)

Meet the Author

Barry Burd, PhD, teaches computer science at Drew University and trains professional programmers. He also speaks at conferences worldwide and is the author of Java 2 For Dummies.

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Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Psoup More than 1 year ago
Posted 5/5/2010: I am a professional developer (in many languages other than Java). I have programmed in Java previously but as in any tool if you do not use it you will lose it. I lost it! I have found some of the Java terminology to be intimidating but programming all follows the same rules. Java is no exception. The way Barry wrote the book he was speaking to each reader in a way they can understand and with humor. I wish I had the opportunity to take a class that Barry teaches. Wanting to brush up on my Java and learn new techniques this book does it all. I am completely satisfied and ready to use Java in real business applications.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm currently evaluating this book as a possible textbook for a light class in introductory programming using Java at the high school level. Aside from working through it myself, I'm having a student act as a 'guinea pig' to give me their evaluation of it. The book is written in a style that's fun to read, and it provides good descriptions for a beginning programmer. There are enough programming projects in it to demonstrate the points in the book and keep the text from becoming long, slogging infodumps. There are many areas that are glossed over, but that's necessary at this level and I don't consider it a flaw. They've done well. It shares the flaw of many beginning programming books of limiting the examples to non-graphical apps for far too long, in my opinion. The book's real flaw, however, is the use of a platform-specific IDE from the very start. Using a platform-specific IDE with Java is outrageous, IMO. The examples are given with step-by-step programming instructions tied directly to this IDE, so any student who can't or doesn't use this IDE will be at a big disadvantage early on. The flaw can be overcome if the reader has some help from someone else, or the patience to figure out the relationship between the book's instructions for its IDE and what they are using. But if you're working on your own on a platform other than Windows, it could be a big problem. I'd much rather have seen this book using a standard multiplatform IDE like Eclipse or Netbeans with setup info to simplify the interfaces for a beginner. Still, the tone and style of the book and the fine examples are the saving graces of it. If you're starting out on Windows, I highly recommend this book, but I also recommend moving yourself to a standard IDE as soon as you feel competant to do so. If you're starting out on a Mac or Linux, this book will still work but there'll be a rough bump near the start while you set yourself up with Eclipse or Netbeans and learn to equate the directions in the book with your IDE. Fortunately, the Apple Developer Connection and Linux HOWTOs give good info that will get you started, substituting for the first few chapters of this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A "Beginning" book, and that's about as far as it goes. Several of the sample programs do not work with Java 7. The author spends too much time attempting to develop cute and humorous analogies; making the sample programs difficult to understand. Most readers won't need the five paragraph description (Chapter 15) of the author's visits to his Aunt Edna as an introduction to Java's For statements. The opening paragraphs of Chapter 20, "Oooey GUI Was a Worm" are insulting, and made this reader feel like a dummy for having bought the book in the first place. Save your money, and use the free Java on-line tutorials.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
His book is a great guide & hand book for first time programmers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A well written book and easy to understand, but the NOOK figures are hard to see/read on my 7 inch Samsung tablet.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I learned so fast!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Barry Burd did an excellent job with this book. He makes learning basic java extremely easy - I would suggest this book for ANYONE that wants to get a good boost start for learning programming with java. Best of all, you don't need any previous programming experience.