Beginning Relational Data Modeling / Edition 2

Beginning Relational Data Modeling / Edition 2

4.0 1
by Sharon Allen, Evan Terry
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590594630

ISBN-13: 9781590594636

Pub. Date: 03/24/2005

Publisher: Apress

Data storage design, and awareness of how data needs to be utilized within an organization, is of prime importance in ensuring that company data systems work efficiently. If you need to know how to capture the information needs of a business system in a relational database model, but don’t know where to start, then this is the book for you.

Beginning

Overview

Data storage design, and awareness of how data needs to be utilized within an organization, is of prime importance in ensuring that company data systems work efficiently. If you need to know how to capture the information needs of a business system in a relational database model, but don’t know where to start, then this is the book for you.

Beginning Relational Data Modeling, Second Edition will lead you step-by-step through the process of developing an effective logical data model for your relational database. No previous data modeling experience is even required. The authors infuse the book with concise, straightforward wisdom to explain a usually complex, jargon-filled discipline. And examples are based on their extensive experience modeling for real business systems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594636
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
03/24/2005
Edition description:
2nd ed. 2005
Pages:
632
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.34(d)

Table of Contents

A table of contents is not available for this title.

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Beginning Relational Data Modeling 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While the book calls itself 'Beginning', it actually takes you a long way into understanding and making a relational model. The authors heavily downplay the formal maths aspect. No predicate calculus and no proving of theorems. Of necessity, the Normal Forms are explained, including the contributions of Boyce and Codd to this development. Simple relational tables are used for illustration. This topic lends itself easily to diagrams of interrelated data sets held in tables. Which is probably more visually understandable anyway. Perhaps the most important chapter is on making a conceptual model of your system or problem. In a top down approach, you start here. And it can be rather intangible until you build up expertise. Subsequent chapters show how to parlay the conceptual model into a logical model and then into a physical model. Important steps, to be sure, but secondary. Focus on the essentials.