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When the first edition of this book was written, XML was a relatively new language but already gaining ground fast and becoming more and more widely used in a vast range of applications. By the time of the second edition, XML had already proven itself to be more than a passing fad, and was in fact being used throughout the industry for an incredibly wide range of uses. With the third edition, it was clear that XML was a mature technology, but more important, it became evident that the XML landscape was dividing ...
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Beginning XML

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Overview

When the first edition of this book was written, XML was a relatively new language but already gaining ground fast and becoming more and more widely used in a vast range of applications. By the time of the second edition, XML had already proven itself to be more than a passing fad, and was in fact being used throughout the industry for an incredibly wide range of uses. With the third edition, it was clear that XML was a mature technology, but more important, it became evident that the XML landscape was dividing into several areas of expertise. Now in this edition, we needed to categorize the increasing number of specifications surrounding XML, which either use XML or provide functionality in addition to the XML core specification.

So what is XML? It's a markup language, used to describe the structure of data in meaningful ways. Anywhere that data is input/output, stored, or transmitted from one place to another, is a potential fit for XML's capabilities. Perhaps the most well-known applications are web-related (especially with the latest developments in handheld web access—for which some of the technology is XML-based). However, there are many other non-web-based applications for which XML is useful—for example, as a replacement for (or to complement) traditional databases, or for the transfer of financial information between businesses. News organizations, along with individuals, have also been using XML to distribute syndicated news stories and blog entries.

This book aims to teach you all you need to know about XML—what it is, how it works, what technologies surround it, and how it can best be used in a variety of situations, from simple data transfer to using XML in your web pages. It answers the fundamental questions:

* What is XML?

* How do you use XML?

* How does it work?

* What can you use it for, anyway?

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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
If you’re a programmer who’s only now encountering XML, you do have one advantage: The pioneers have already taken the arrows for you. It’s easier to assess when XML makes sense. There are now best practices for using it. And there’s now a very well thought out beginner’s guide to using it when it does make sense.

Beginning XML, Third Edition teaches XML’s foundational concepts while introducing contemporary techniques for processing, communication, database integration, display, and programming. Along the way, the authors illuminate a wide range of technologies, from SAX to RSS, WSDL to SVG.

To help you apply all that, they wrap up with two start-to-finish case studies. In one, you’ll use PHP to work with XML documents; in the second, you’ll construct a complete XML-based web service with Microsoft’s .NET. Not bad for a “beginner”! Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118169353
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/15/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1080
  • Sales rank: 788,563
  • File size: 21 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

David Hunter is a Senior Technical Consultant for CGI, a full-service IT and business process services partner. Providing technical leadership and guidance for solving his clients' business problems, he is a jack-of-all-trades and master of some. With a career that has included design, development, support, training, writing, and other roles, he has had extensive experience building scalable, reliable, enterprise-class applications. David loves to peek under the hood at any new technology that comes his way, and when one catches his fancy, he really gets his hands dirty. He loves nothing more than sharing these technologies with others.

Jeff Rafter is an independent consultant based in Redlands, California. His focus is one emerging technology and web standards, including XML and validation. he currently works with Baobab Health Partnership with a focus on improving world health.

Joe Fawcett (http://joe.fawcett.name) started programming in the 1970s and worked briefly in IT when leaving full-time education. he then pursued a more checkered career before returning to software development in 1994. In 2003 he was awarded the title of Microsoft Most Valuable Professional in XML for community contributions and technical expertise; he has subsequently been re-awarded every year since. Joe currently works in London and is head of software development for FTC Kaplan Ltd., a leading international provider of accountancy and business training.

Eric van der Vlist is an independent consultant and trainer. His domains of expertise include web development and XML technologies. He is the creator and main editor of XMLfr.org, the main site dedicated to XML technologies in French, the lead author of Professional Web 2.0 Programming, the author of the O'Reilly animal books XML Schema and RELAX NG and a member or the ISO DSDL (http://dsdl.org) working group focused on XML schema languages. he is based in Paris and can be reached at vdv@dyomedea.com , or meet him at one of the many conferences where he presents his projects.

Danny Ayers is a freelance developer and consultant specializing in cutting-edge web technologies. His blog (http://dannyayers.com) tends to feature material relating to the Semantic Web and/or cat photos.

Jon Duckett co-authored Wrox Press' first book on XML in 1998. After 4 years with Wrox in the UK, Jon is now a freelance web developer working with clients in the UK, US and Australia, and has co-authored 10 programming books.

Andrew Watt has been programming for 20 years, including 10 years work with the Web. He has several books in the areas of XML and XSLT to his credit and is well known for his work on XML.com.

Linda McKinnon has more than 10 years of experience as a successful trainer and network engineer, assisting both private and public enterprises in network architecture design, implementation, system administration, and RP procurement. She is a renowned mentor and has published numerous Linux study guide for Wiley Press and Gearhead Press.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Part I: Introduction.

Chapter 1: What Is XML?

Chapter 2: Well-Formed XML.

Chapter 3: XML Namespaces.

Part II: Validation.

Chapter 4: Document Type Definitions.

Chapter 5: XML Schemas.

Chapter 6: RELAX NG.

Part III: Processing.

Chapter 7: XPath.

Chapter 8: XSLT.

Part IV: Databases.

Chapter 9: XQuery, the XML Query Language.

Chapter 10: XML and Databases.

Part V: Programming.

Chapter 11: The XML Document Object Model (DOM).

Chapter 12: Simple API for XML (SAX).

Part VI: Communication.

Chapter 13: RSS, Atom, and Content Syndication.

Chapter 14: Web Services.

Chapter 15: SOAP and WSDL.

Chapter 16: Ajax.

Part VII: Display.

Chapter 17: Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

Chapter 18: XHTML.

Chapter 19: Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG).

Chapter 20: XForms.

Part VIII: Case Study.

Chapter 21: Case Study: Payment Calculator.

Chapter 22: Case Study: Payment Calculator—Ruby on Rails.

Appendix A: Exercise Solutions.

Appendix B: XPath Reference.

Appendix C: XSLT Reference.

Appendix D: The XML Document Object Model.

Appendix E: XML Schema Element and Attribute Reference.

Appendix F: XML Schema Datatypes Reference.

Appendix G: SAX 2.0.2 Reference.

Index.

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