Behavior in Organizations: Understanding and Managing the Human Side of Work / Edition 8

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Overview

Organizational Behavior:
The Ultimate Reality Show

Three years ago, when the previous edition of this book was published, Enron and WorldCom were successful and highly acclaimed companies, involvement in a dot-corn was an assured path to riches, and September ii was just a date on the calendar. Today, that's all changed. In a very short time, it's become a different world, especially the business world. Companies that once moved "from bricks to clicks" today are returning to bricks, but are keeping the clicks as well. Many organizations that downsized in a sagging economy subsequently rehired employees, only to downsize once more. And, workplaces that used to be considered safe havens from the uncertainties of a sometimes-evil world, today are considered far more vulnerable than ever.

Because the field of OB is constantly adjusting to reality, we think of it—and this book—as "the ultimate reality show." As in the TV show, Survivor, only the most adaptable individuals and teams in the workplace can be expected to make it to tomorrow. And, as in the TV show, Big Brother, relationships with other people also hold the key to success at work. Finally, just as winners in these television programs stand to receive large sums of money and are likely to enjoy the experience of playing the game, so too do employers and employees benefit financially and personally when they have mastered OB. Unlike these so-called reality shows, with their carefully scripted scenarios and meticulously chosen casts, however, behavior in organizations is reality. Its effects are ongoing and profound. And this is why we consider it to be "the ultimate"in reality, and why we put so much care into preparing this book.

Topic Coverage: Old and New

You would not have a serious OB book without paying attention to Weber's concept of bureaucracy, Maslow's need hierarchy theory, and dozens of other classic theories and studies. Such works are to be found on these pages. Competing for space are an equal number of more contemporary approaches to OB that also have received our attention. Consider, for example, just a few of the many new topics covered in this book:

Ethics audits, corporate social responsibility, e-training, Chief Knowledge Officer, successful intelligence, emoticons, organizational compassion', religious intolerance, cyber-venting and much more!



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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
New edition of an established text covering such areas as the nature of organizations, the basic human processes involved in understanding and adapting to the work environment, the individual and the group, group processes, leadership, and organizational processes and development. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130664914
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 11/21/2002
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 8
  • Pages: 691
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 11.16 (h) x 1.31 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The Nature and Study of Organizations 1
Ch. 2 Work in the Twenty-First Century: The Changing World of People and Organizations 33
Ch. 3 Perception and Learning: Understanding and Adapting to the Work Environment 70
Ch. 4 Individual Differences: Personality and Abilities 107
Ch. 5 Motivation in Organizations 140
Ch. 6 Work-Related Attitudes: Feelings About Jobs, Organizations, and People 175
Ch. 7 Career Development and Work Stress 211
Ch. 8 Group Dynamics and Teamwork 247
Ch. 9 Interpersonal Communication in Organizations 287
Ch. 10 Decision Making in Organizations 329
Ch. 11 Helping, Cooperation, and Conflict in Organizations 367
Ch. 12 Influence, Power, and Politics in Organizations 400
Ch. 13 Leadership: Its Nature and Impact in Organizations 431
Ch. 14 The Work Environment: Culture and Technology 468
Ch. 15 Organizational Structure and Design 503
Ch. 16 Organizational Change and Development 543
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Preface

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR: THE ULTIMATE REALITY SHOW

Three years ago, when the previous edition of this book was published, Enron and WorldCom were successful and highly acclaimed companies; involvement in a dot-com was an assured path to riches, and September 11 was just a date on the calendar. Today, that's all changed. In a very short time, it's become a different world, especially the business world. Companies that once moved "from bricks to clicks" today are returning to bricks, but are keeping the clicks as well. Many organizations that downsized in a sagging economy subsequently rehired employees, only to downsize once more. And, workplaces that used to be considered safe havens from the uncertainties of a sometimes evil world, today are considered far more vulnerable than ever.

To be sure, in preparing the eighth edition of Behavior in Organizations, we have taken careful notice of today's ethical scandals, the always shifting—and sometimes troubled—economy, and underlying concerns about terrorism that reside in our consciousness. Then again, doing otherwise would be impossible. As chroniclers of the world of work and organizations, we cannot help but come across these themes. These issues, and many others, are on the minds of the students we teach in the classroom (undergraduates, MBA candidates, and doctoral students), the workers we train on the job (ranging from minimum-wage laborers to top CEOs), and the officials from the companies to whom we provide consulting services (from start-ups to Fortune 500 firms). Whatever is on their minds also is on ours. And, these concerns get translated into coverage in this book.

For the mostpart, what everyone wants is relevance. "Theories and research are important," our students acknowledge, so long as they offer insight into what's happening in individual's heads, what's going on in work teams, and how people are interacting with their organizations. "Tell me something I need to know," they clamor; so we listen, and we deliver. And, if those plaques acknowledging our teaching and scholarship that line the walls of our offices mean anything, we have been delivering precisely what's deeded in an effective manner for more than 60 years combined. In preparing this book, our mission was to capture this relevance in a form that could enlighten our target audience—college students who desire to learn about the complexities ,of human behavior in organizations.

Fortunately, we are in a good position to appreciate these complexities. When not plying our trade in the classroom or the executive suite, we can be found conducting research that contributes to the scholarly contributions that are the foundation of our field. Indeed, this is our fundamental task as professors who work in universities at which scholarship is not only valued, but demanded. And, we are proud of the body of knowledge our field's research has generated—not just our own work, but also the research of our many colleagues in the field. After all, without such scholarly contributions, we would have no basis for knowing—let alone, teaching—anything about behavior in organizations that went beyond mere speculation based on personal experience. Of course, as a field, organizational behavior (OB) is firmly grounded in science—and these scientific underpinnings also are highlighted in this book. Indeed, this has been a hallmark of Behavior in Organizations throughout the quarter-century of its life. The hundreds of professors who have adopted earlier editions of this book throughout the years, and the thousands of students who have read it, have valued our research-based approach. These individuals, our core constituency, surely will be pleased to find that this orientation has been retained in this edition of the text.

Thus far, we have referred to this book as practical in orientation and also research-based. Indeed, we have taken extensive steps to ensure that it is the best of these seemingly disparate worlds. This is not a contradiction. Rather, this duality echoes the fundamental orientation of the field of OB. It is based on theory and research, but it is not pure, "ivory tower" research. It is work that offers key insights into the world of work. Because the field of OB is a blend of research, theory, and practical application, so too, quite deliberately, is this book.

We think of organizational behavior as an ever—shifting terrain-and, our job is to map that terrain for current travelers. It is a scientific field that chronicles the ongoing nature of real organizations and the behavior of those individuals and teams that work within them. As economic, technological and social conditions change, so too does the field. Some topics grow in popularity as others wane. Issues and problems that at one time may have seemed so important now may seem outdated. And of course, as advances in research and theory occur, new insight is provided about phenomena that shape the course of managerial practice.

Because the field of OB is constantly adjusting to reality, we think of it—and this book—as "the ultimate reality show" As in the TV show, Survivor, only the most adaptable individuals and teams in the workplace can be expected to make it to tomorrow. And, as in the TV show, Big Brother, relationships with other people also hold the key to success at work. Finally, just as winners in these television programs stand to receive large sums of money and are likely to enjoy the experience of playing the game, so too do employers and employees benefit financially and personally when they have mastered OB. Unlike these so-called "reality" shows, with their carefully scripted scenarios and meticulously chosen casts, however, behavior in organizations is reality. Its effects are ongoing and profound. And this is why we consider it to be "the ultimate" in reality, and why we put so much care into preparing this book.

A CAREFULLY BALANCED APPROACH TO THE FIELD

We think of this book's coverage as offering a carefully balanced approach to OB. Some competing textbooks focus a great deal on one topic or another. Others invest all their intellectual capital in a particular conceptual or pedagogical approach. These presentations are then justified as selling points. We do not do take this approach. Although such books are unique, their uniqueness comes at a cost: Skewed approaches do not reflect what today's field of OB is really like. To us, characterizing the field as it is, is crucial—and, a responsibility we don't take lightly. For this reason, we focus on representing OB as the balanced, integrated field it is.

To illustrate this point, let's consider how our balanced approach comes across in three major respects—topic coverage, mix of theory and practice, and pedagogical focus.

Topic Coverage: Old and New

You would not have a serious OB book without paying attention to Weber's concept of bureaucracy, Maslow's need hierarchy theory, and dozens of other classic theories and studies. Such works are to be found on these pages. Competing for space are an equal number of more contemporary approaches to OB that also have received our attention. Consider, for example, just a few of the many new topics covered in this book.

  • Ethics audits (Chapter 1)
  • Corporate social responsibility (Chapter 1)
  • E-training (Chapter 2)
  • Chief Knowledge Officer (Chapter 2)
  • Successful intelligence (Chapter 3)
  • Emoticons (Chapter 4)
  • Organizational compassion (Chapter 4)
  • Religious intolerance (Chapter 5)
  • Cyber-venting (Chapter 5)
  • Incentive stock option plans (Chapter 6)
  • Online networking (Chapter 7)
  • Business incubators (Chapter 7)
  • High performance teams (Chapter 8)
  • Law of telecosm (Chapter 8)
  • Cross-cultural communication (Chapter 9)
  • Computer-mediated communication (Chapter 9)
  • Adaptive agents (Chapter 10)
  • Person sensitivity bias (Chapter 10)
  • Workplace bullying (Chapter 11)
  • Cyberloafing (Chapter 11)
  • Download time (Chapter 12)
  • Executive coaching (Chapter 13)
  • Action learning (Chapter 13)
  • Entrepreneurial creativity (Chapter 14)
  • Spinoffs (Chapter 15)
  • Networked incubators (Chapter 15)
  • Action labs (Chapter 16)
  • Appreciative inquiry (Chapter 16)
  • Online surveys (Appendix I)

Theory? Research? Practice? Yes, Yes, and Yes!

In an old TV commercial, two people are found arguing whether the product in question is a candy mint or a breath mint. Shortly into the debate (albeit not quick enough for our tastes), we are spared by someone who proposes a resolution: "Stop," she says, "You're both right." We are reminded of this drama whenever we hear similar discussions about OB. To those who wish to argue that "OB is a theoretical field" or that "OB is an applied field," we issue the same admonishment: "Stop, you're both right."

Indeed, our image of the field of OB is that it is an applied science—that is, science undertaken with practical applications in mind. Those of us who are involved in OB think of ourselves as scientist-practitioners. We conduct "pure" scientific research for purposes of understanding fundamental individual, group, and organizational processes. We then put this knowledge to use in organizations. And, based on what we learn, we then go back to the drawing board, revising our underlying theories as dictated, and conduct more research. This leads to more application, and so the cycle continues. This, we believe makes the field of OB so special, so unique, and so important.

We have gone out of our way in this book to capture this process of moving from theory, to research, to application, back to theory. This is a broad and dynamic approach, making it difficult to capture, but we believe we have done so—at least, wherever the various pieces of the puzzle are identifiable. For example, in Chapter 2 we cover both theories of learning and how these theories are involved in such organizational practices as training and organizational behavior modification. We designed parallels between theory and practice in Chapter 5, where we consider theories of job satisfaction and organizational commitment, as well as ways these approaches may be applied to improving these important organizational attitudes. And, we do the same in Chapter 6, where we highlight the practical implications of each of the theories of motivation we discuss.

More than simply indicating how various theories may be applied, we identify precisely how they are being applied in today's organizations. So, for example, in Chapter 7, we not only describe the mentorship process, but precisely the forms it is taking today. Similarly, our discussion of diversity management programs in Chapter 5 not only analyzes the various forms such programs take, but brings these abstractions to life by identifying exactly what certain companies are doing by way of diversity management. These are just a few examples. We systematically discuss actual organizational practices throughout this book. Our reasons for doing so are straightforward: It not only brings the theoretical material to life, but it also illustrates the simple truth that the practice of OB is crucial in today's organizations. To talk only about theory, or research, or practical application (potential or actual), would be misleading. Because the field of OB is all these things. So too have we incorporated all of these elements into this book.

Pedagogical Focus: Knowledge and Skills

Educators tell us that there is a fundamental distinction between teaching people about something—providing knowledge—and showing them how to do something—developing their skills. In the field of OB, this distinction becomes blurred. After all, to fully appreciate how to do something you have to have the requisite knowledge. For this reason, we pay attention in this book to both knowledge and skills.

As an illustration, consider how the two orientations come together in Chapter 14. We not only describe how the process of creativity works, but we also provide tools for developing one's own creativity. The same duality also may be seen in Chapter 9. In the course of describing organizational communication we discuss the process of listening. Then, to help readers become effective listeners, we present an exercise designed to promote active listening skills. By doing this—not only in these two examples, but throughout the book—we intend to enable readers to understand OB, and also to help them practice it in their own lives.

Taken together, our coverage of classic and cutting-edge topics, our attention to the blend between theory, research, and practice, and our dual emphasis on knowledge and skills reflects what we consider a balanced and realistic orientation to OB. This is the essence of the field as it exists today, and this book, as we present it to you here.

NEW CHAPTERS AND SPECIAL FEATURES

In the course of revising this book we made many changes. Some of these came in the process of seeking that balance to which we just referred, and others were necessitated by our commitment to advancing the latest advances in the field. Many of the changes we made are subtle, referring only to how a topic was framed relative to others. A good many other changes are more noticeable, and involve the shifting of major topics into new places and the addition of brand new topics. Doing this required the creation of several new chapters and the addition of new features.

New and Newly Organized Chapters

Readers who are already familiar with this book will immediately note some new and newly organized chapters. Some examples:

  • Chapter 4, "Emotions and Stress on the Job." This chapter brings together new material on two rapidly developing topics in the field of OB. Conceptual advances in the area of emotions and affect are paired with important practical applications regarding stress management to provide valuable personal guidance for readers. Here, the emphasis is on both how to manage others as well as the more basic issue of managing oneself.
  • Chapter 11, "Interpersonal Behavior: Working With and Against Others." By highlighting both the positive and negative sides of human nature, this chapter juxtaposes two opposing themes in the field of OB. It provides an opportunity to expand our coverage of the growing literature on deviant behavior in organizations, and to contrast it with a more established literature on helping and cooperating with others. Newly expanded material on the psychological contract and trust further reflect recent conceptual advances in these areas.
  • Chapter 7, "Career Dynamics." Given the importance of developing and managing careers to readers, we now devote an entire chapter to this topic. Classic research on making career choices is paired with current thinking on frequently changing careers. Practical advice is given about how to use the Internet for informal networking and to facilitate job hunting.

New Special Features

A new feature of this book is designed to make it easier than ever for readers to access material of special applied interest. In addition to many in-text examples, each chapter also contains a section entitled "Best Practices:" These sections provide a close-up look at OB in practice—extended examples of current organizational practices that illustrate key concepts from the book. This brings the material to life and makes it more relevant to students. Some examples include:

  • "The Best at Diversity: Pacific Enterprises" (Chapter 5)
  • "SEI Investments: Where Total Teamwork Rules" (Chapter 8)
  • "Naval Officers Use Decision Support Systems to Make Combat Decisions" (Chapter 10)
  • "Coaching: From Locker Room to Boardroom" (Chapter 13)
  • "How Effective Companies Inspire Innovation" (Chapter 14)
  • "Simulating Organizational Change" (Chapter 16)

Another applied feature of the book is more hands-on in nature. Special sections called, "How to Do It;" present several concrete tips for readers to follow when attempting to carry out some practice related to the field of OB. Examples include the following.

  • "Conducting an Ethics Audit" (Chapter 1)
  • "Coping with the Emotional Fallout of Terrorism: How Can Companies Help?" (Chapter 4)
  • "Avoiding Pitfalls in Diversity Management" (Chapter 5)
  • "Being an Effective Whistle-Blower" (Chapter 11)
  • "Boosting Cultural- Intelligence" (Chapter 13)
  • "Making Changes Stick: Tips from Three Established Organizations" (Chapter 16)

A third new feature of this book is designed to help readers understand how the field of OB influences and is influenced by rapid advances in information technology. These special sections, called, "OB in an E-World," highlight one of the most potent sources for organizational change today. Some examples are as follows.

  • "Making Telecommuting Work" (Chapter 1)
  • "E-Training: Booming, but Beware" (Chapter 2)
  • "Using "Emoticons" to Express Emotions in E-Mail: Do Those Smiley Faces Make Any Difference?" (Chapter 4)
  • "Making Connections in Cyberspace: Online Networking" (Chapter 7)
  • "The Spam Problem: Costlier Than You May Think" (Chapter 9)
  • "When Should an Organization Go Virtual?" (Chapter 15)
  • "Using Online Competitive Intelligence for Organizational Change" (Chapter 16)

A fourth new feature included in this book is entitled "OB in A Diverse World:" The material in these special sections highlights two critical features of today's workplace: the global and international nature of organizations, and the high level of racial and ethnic diversity found in organizations. The emphasis is on how OB practices differ in various nations and for various ethnic groups within the North American workplace. Here are just a few selected examples:

  • "Performance Evaluations: Comparing the United States and Japan" (Chapter 2)
  • "Why Do Americans Work Longer Hours Than Germans?" (Chapter 6)
  • "Performance in Culturally Diverse Groups" (Chapter 8)
  • "'Hola and Hello': Welcome to StarMedia's Trilingual Webcast" (Chapter 9)
  • "Are U.S. Businesses Overly Concerned About Ethical Decisions?" (Chapter 10)
  • "Negotiating Tactics in the United States, Germany, and Japan" (Chapter 11)
  • "Guanxi: Social Networking in China" (Chapter 13)

New End-of-Chapter Pedagogical Features

At the end of each chapter, two groups of pedagogical features may be found. The first, named "Points to Ponder;" includes three types of questions:

  • Questions for Review. These are questions designed to help students determine the extent to which they picked up the major points contained in each chapter.
  • Experiential Questions. These are questions that get students to understand various OB phenomena by thinking about how various experiences in their work lives.
  • Questions to Analyze. The questions in this category are designed to help readers think about the interconnections between various OB phenomena and/or how they may be applied.

The second category of pedagogical features found at the end of each chapter is referred to as "Experiencing Organizational Behavior." This includes the following four types of experiential exercises.

  • Individual Exercise. Students can complete these exercises on their own to gain some insight into various OB phenomena.
  • Group Exercise. By working in small groups, students completing these exercises will be able to experience an important OB phenomenon or concept. The experience itself also will help them develop team-building skills.
  • Web Surfing Exercises. Each chapter contains two exercises that require students to look for various types of OB-related information on the Internet. Each of these exercises gives students an opportunity to expand upon material they read in the chapter.
  • Practicing OB. This exercise is applications-based. It describes a hypothetical problem situation and challenges the reader to explain how various OB practices can be applied to solving it.

RETURN OF YOUR FAVORITE SPECIAL FEATURES

Fans of the previous edition of this book needn't worry about the whereabouts of the book's most popular special features. These are back, and better than ever. These include the following:

  • Cases. Each chapter contains two cases, the many of which are completely new or updated. One at the beginning of the chapter, Preview Case, is designed to set-up the material that follows by putting it in the context of a real organizational event. The chapter-end case, Case in Point, is designed to review the material already covered and to bring that material to life. Specific tie-ins are made by use of discussion questions appearing after each "Case in Point" feature.
  • Talking Graphics. All data presented in graphs come complete with labeled boxes literally pointing at the major idea it contains. Between the highly descriptive in-text material, the detailed captions, and these talking graphics, students will continue to find this book approachable and easy to understand.

UPDATED SUPPLEMENTS PACKAGE

Instructors adopting this book have available a wide array of ancillary materials designed to help them teach their courses. Likewise, students using this book have access to many useful tools to help them use this book more effectively. These supplements are designed specifically for this book and are carefully coordinated with its content and features.

  • Instructor's Manual. Contains a variety of useful features for instructors using this book in their classes. Among these are learning objectives; chapter outlines with case summaries; chapter summaries; and suggested answers to all "Points to Ponder" and "Case in Point" questions. The Instructor's Manual also includes a video guide for the "On Location at Student Advantage" video series.
  • Test Item File. Contains 100 items per chapter, including multiple-choice, true/false, and essay questions.
  • PowerPoint Slides. Included on the instructor's Resource CD-ROM, as well as on the Web site for the text, the PowerPoint presentation includes more than 300 slides that highlight fundamental concepts and integrate key graphs, figures, and illustrations from the text.
  • Instructor's Resource CD-ROM. This all-in-one multimedia product is an invaluable asset for professors who prefer to work with electronic files rather than traditional print supplements. This CD-ROM contains the Instructor's Resource Manual, PowerPoint Slides, and the Test Item File.
  • Custom Web Site Faculty can access and download all supplements (Instructor's Manual, PowerPoint Slides, and Test Item File) online.
  • On Location at Student Advantage Video Series. Video segments filmed at Studentadvantage.com, a real student resource company, cover such key topics as, organizational change, groups, stress, organizational structure, and motivation. Summaries of these video cases and discussion questions appear in the text.
  • Internet Study Guide. A Web site for this book contains a variety of useful exercises to help students assess their mastery of the material covered in this book. Specifically, for each chapter, there are multiple-choice questions, true/false questions, and Internet exercises.
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