Behind Bars: Surviving Prison [NOOK Book]

Overview

A judge hands down a stretch in a local, state, or federal prison. It's time for some serious life lessons. With the crime rates soaring in the United States and the prison population growing faster than at any other time in American history, staying alive and well - both mentally and physically - is tougher than ever.
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Behind Bars: Surviving Prison

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Overview

A judge hands down a stretch in a local, state, or federal prison. It's time for some serious life lessons. With the crime rates soaring in the United States and the prison population growing faster than at any other time in American history, staying alive and well - both mentally and physically - is tougher than ever.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440695773
  • Publisher: DK Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/1/2002
  • Sold by: DK
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 356,073
  • File size: 233 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(30)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2012

    worth reading

    This is a very accurate book about what prison life is like from someone who's been there. Gives accurate details from the point of being arrested to release and what all goes on from day to day in between. A little opinionated. Would be a good book for young people or anyone to read BEFORE they get in trouble with the law!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2011

    such an eye opening book. scarey

    My son, who is now in prison, recommended that I read this book. He said he wished he had read this book years ago......

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2008

    My "Guidebook"

    My daughter was the victim of a stalker and we have been going through the legal process. This book has been the resource that I turn to over and over again whenever I have a question about how the legal system works. Although I sometimes find that I could use more in-depth information, this book gives me a good idea of how bail works, what happens when there's an arrest warrant issued, etc.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2005

    KK REVIEWER' Guidebook to a Distant Country

    Yes, you are a good person. But a relative or friend may not be so law-abiding. And stuff happens. Here is what to do if you are ever arrested (mostly what not to do) and what you can expect if put behind bars. Written by two professors of criminology one was a former correctional officer, and the other served eleven years in federal custody, including maximum security. They know what they are talking about, and they dispense their straight dope with surprising clarity and uncommon elegance and wit. (One chapter is called 'You've Got Jail!'). They've written a guidebook to a distant country and its alien customs and ways may you never arrive there. You get street-smarts from inmates and wise counsel from the Man. I rank my books by how dog-eared they are this one had nearly every page marked and underlined. This is one of the books you want to read before you need it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2005

    Behind Bars: Surviving Prison

    This book does not pull any punches about prison life. Advice is freely given and some of it may be disturbing. For example, the authors clearly state that you WILL have to fight in order to survive behind bars. If for no reason other than to show others that you cannot be 'turned out' or be made a victim. As an attorney who has toiled in the criminal justice system (both as a defense atty and as a prosecutor), I was moved by the book's honesty, compassion, and accounts of prison life. There are sections dealing with corrupt guards, gangs, drugs, sex, money, etc. Nothing is left out. This book should be required reading for all those who advocate 'tough on crime' as this read clearly demostrates that prison is a brutal and unforgiving experience.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2005

    Behind Bars: Surviving Prison

    Behind Bars was published May 2002 by Alpha a division of Penguin and Prentice-Hall. It is written from the ¿convict perspective.¿ The book has a unique theme in that it was written as a scholarly discussion of how to survive arrest, indictment, conviction, jail, prison, and prison release. It is based on the experiences of the authors, both criminologists, one a former correctional worker, the other an ex-convict. This project summarizes much of what they have learned studying criminal justice procedures and correctional systems. It is one of those rare books written by academics that addresses the social problems created by criminal justice machinery. The book is unusual in that it addresses diverse audiences, college students, researchers in the field, professionals in criminology, as well as the general public. Behind Bars is a critical book, based on ethnographic data, that successfully translates research findings into informal discussion that can then be shared with a wider audience. This volume has been widely adopted for criminology and corrections courses. Undergraduate students in sociology, criminology, and criminal justice love this book - some of them desperately need it. I can attest to the importance of this book from my own experience. After teaching college level sociology classes in a federal prison for ten semesters now, I see a great need for research that addresses the actual experiences of life in prison and the problems inmates face, but that is, at the same time, grounded in criminological theory This book helps to close this gab. For these reasons Behind Bars is a unique contribution to the sociological understanding of crime, delinquency, and the criminal justice system.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2005

    Behind Bars: Surviving Prison

    A few years ago Jeff Ross and Steve Richards, who are professors at the University of Baltimore and Northern Kentucky University respectively, inaugurated a new subgroup within the American Society of Criminology. ASC is the largest criminological organization in the world and the new subgroup was named ¿Convict Criminology.¿ Consisting principally of a small group of ex-cons who had moved on to become college professors, the objective of the Convict Criminology group has been to promote scholarly research into crime and criminal justice that is informed by people with first-hand knowledge of their subject. Jeff Ross and Steve Richards both have experience of prisons: Jeff as a former correctional worker; Steve as a former maximum security federal prison inmate, and it is that perspective that lies behind this book. Behind Bars is the first title this pair has produced together, but it has quickly been followed by a jointly-edited volume, Convict Criminology; a collection of writings by ex-convict criminologists. Behind Bars is a guide to living in prison. Although primarily intended as advice for incoming first-timers and those at risk of such an outcome, the practical advice the book offers will, of course, be of immense interest to criminologists, correctional workers and others concerned with the social dynamics of prisons. Consisting of 13 chapters in four parts, the book takes the reader step-by-step through the incarceration process. Beginning with arrest, the authors tell readers about what is likely to happen if they get busted, about their rights and about how these rights may, or may not, be applied. Sound advice is given about what to do and what not to do if arrested, about various options that may be presented and about the pros and cons of such options. There then follows a discussion of federal and state prison systems, with a particular emphasis on federal custody. Section three takes readers behind the wire and tells them what to expect if they ever get sentenced to time. More sound practical advice is given about how to act in those critical first days, who to speak to, who to avoid, and about various situations that are likely to crop up. The first thing that most novice inmates worry about is the threat of robbery, assault, and sexual violation. Ross and Richards give candid and valuable advice about what to do when such situations occur ¿ because they almost certainly will. There is a fine line between responding in a way that will earn you respect, and one that may get you killed. They also provide an interesting run-down on gangs, and the types of gangs that exist in various parts of the country, together with some information about the various roles that gangs are likely to play in the politics of an institution. Finally, there is a section on what it¿s like getting out: the exhilaration of unaccustomed freedom followed by the trauma, especially for long-termers, of adjusting to a complex, fast-moving, and often hostile world. Perhaps one of the most valuable sections of the entire book, this section gives wise guidance on how to stay out once you¿ve got out. The pitfalls that so many ex-cons stumble into are traversed, along with the problems a person is likely to experience with employers, landlords and parole authorities. The powerful message is clear: staying out isn¿t going to be easy. The book ends with an interesting glossary of prison terms and a handy catalogue containing the names and addresses of 25 prison reform and inmate welfare agencies. As an ex-drug dealer who did time in a maximum security prison in New Zealand, the principal impact of Behind Bars for me is the essential inhumanity that pervades the American criminal justice system. The book reinforced an impression I have gained from touring at least two dozen American penitentiaries during my career as a professional criminologist. In America, far more so that in New Zealand, you really do lose a great part

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2004

    Didn't Like It

    I was looking forward to reading this book and finding out about prison life. I thought this book was going to tell real-life stories of being behind bars. It did not do so. It told how one could survive in prison, from how to get good food to how to avoid a riot. I am a deputy and I was disappointed in reading this book, it was not up to my expectations at all.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2004

    Required reading for families and friends of prisoners

    I wish I had read this wonderful book a long time ago...maybe my son wouldn't be in a federal prison now. But, now that he is, the authors have prepared me for the future...even after that much anticipated RELEASE day. BEHIND BARS is very matter of fact. I also just finished TO CATCH THE SNOWFLAKES by Lawrence Schulenberg, who gives me a great big helping of hope. The father of a prisoner has turned from guilt to hope. I needed both books. Thank you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2003

    The Facts

    This book was very easy to read, maybe because it was so interesting, I couldn't put it down. I was hooked within the first two pages. This book was wonderfully written and it provided no nonsense facts. The glossary and index were very helpful. Everyone thinks, "that could never happen to me." But, let me tell you, "you never know and if it does, you'll wish you had read the book."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2002

    a must read for students and laypersons

    Criminologists Drs. Ross and Richards (respectively, a former correctional caseworker and a former federal inmate) provide a cogent and accessible look at the brutal reality that is our criminal justice system. Their humanistic and jargon-free coverage of what it¿s like to be taken into custody, processed and incarcerated is a refreshing departure from the stale, emotionally distant (and often apologetic) coverage that has sadly become the standard fare in the academic coverage of the correctional system. Located both in the world of experiential closeness and scholarly rigour, Ross and Richards expose the harshness and inhumanity inherent in America¿s incarceration industry. Finally, something that I can comfortably fit between Sykes¿ ¿Society of Captives¿ and Irwin and Austin¿s ¿It¿s About Time¿ on my book shelf. Interested in what life in prison is like? Turn off Oz, and open up BEHIND BARS.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2002

    A BOOK TO HELP YOU SURVIVE JAIL AND PRISON

    I SHOULD HAVE READ THIS BOOK BEFORE I GOT ARRESTED BY THE COPS. Ross and Richards are criminology professors. Ross is a former correctional worker. Richards is a former federal convict. Together they have written the book to read on jails and prison. Ross and Richards provide valuable information on what to do when arrested, how to fight a criminal case, hire legal counsel, make bail, survive jail and prison. The book walks you through the ordeal from beginning to end; from arrest, through prison, and home to the community. This is a survival guide written for "everyman" and "everywoman." The Chapter on the "DAY IN THE LIFE OF JOE CONVICT" takes you through one real day in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. I read this book in two days cover to cover. I was unable to put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2002

    I had no idea...until I read this book.

    This book is a must read for anyone of any age, sex, race, or criminal background. I found this book extraordinarily informative on the basics of prison life and some of the precautionary steps to take. This book opened my eyes to aspects of the legal and prison system that I was completely oblivious of before. I highly recommend this book to counselors and teachers working with troubled youth and/or adults or just everyday citizens who think that this could never happen to them. Ross and Richards do a wonderful job of describing the basics of the prison system in a way that everyone can understand and learn from.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2002

    It dosen't get any better then this

    This book is a good read because it showes what life is like from the point of view, of a person who has "been there and done that" I would tell every one I know to read it. I am a ex-Residential advisor and have recommended it to my residents.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2002

    HOW TO SURVIVE ARREST, JAIL, AND PRISON

    There a lots of how to books out there but Behind Bars is something different. This book is assecessible to the general public and gives its readers, an inside perspective on prison. The language is clear and its points are made simply and directly. As an educator who has worked with "street kids," this book will be a useful tool at letting my students appreciate what it means to become ajudicated. Behind Bars is a "how to book" that you hope you will never need, or that your family or friends will ever need. But, on the other hand, maybe we do need to read this book so we get insight on this huge American industry. In order to be a well informed citizen I believe you should read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2002

    Behind Bars Presents the Rest of the Story

    Behind the Bars provides instructive insight into the difference between constitutional rights in theory and constitutional rights in practice; and serves to remind us how vulnerable we are to systematic governmental victimization. Based on personal experiences, Ross and Richards provide practical guidance that just might prevent the reader from being caught off-guard by the criminal justice system.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2002

    Police, lawyers, judges, convicts and family

    If you care about the people who are arrested every day, and what then happens to them and the people they love; if you think people deserve justice AND mercy; if you think that once someone has served their time, that they deserve a second chance in life; if you honestly believe the system can work and be made better from the inside, READ this BOOK, and buy it for others: FOR PRISON LIBRARIES, LAW OFFICES, JUDGE's CHAMBERS. Every person accused or convicted should have access to the first hand knowledge in this book, and agents of the court need it, too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2002

    A Book for Cons, by Cons

    Drs. Ross and Richards present a comprehensive book that serves as both an analytical text of modern American corrections as well as a guidebook for surivival for the incarcerated. The book begins with the moment of arrest, and ends with suggestions for reentry into society and ideas for renovations to the corrections industry. Ross and Richards, having the hands-on corrections experience, know better than to coddle the reader with understatements and niceties. Instead, they put fear into the reader/convict with their barrage of facts, expecially failure rates and recidivism for cons. However, this is all to serve the purpose of putting the reader into a sincere understanding of the prison environment they exist within, or are working to avoid. With this understanding can come their subsequent lessons, which include dealing with guards, staff, and other personnel, social interactions to facilitate and/or avoid with other cons, and proper methods of maintaining proper physical/mental/emotional/intellectual health. The portrayal and probability of having such a fortunate prison experience is not so likley, however their statements are based on the empirical facts they bring, as well as those of others. A reader can certainly hope to never need to apply the lessons of this book, but they must absolutely *never* be so smug as to think that they should never read it for precautionary purposes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2002

    THIS BOOK SHOULD BE A MOVIE

    This was the most fascinating portrayal of life 'behind bars' that I have ever read. A must read and it's also quick and readable . I enjoyed the narrative and description of prison food. You want to buy this book because it will probably give you a lot ot talk about with other people. It's a great conversation piece. It will also make you question the brutality of the federal prison system and understand why recidivism rates are so high. It was like taking an entire class course in one book. It is the kind of book that will make you want to dedicate yourself to studying this subject. A fundamental read if you want to understand the basics of the prison system. If you get arrested or are facing criminal charges this is the book you want to buy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2002

    The other side of the story

    This book is a welcome departure from the stereotypical image of convicts and ex-convicts. The majority of books written by ex-convicts generally reinforce negative images of convicts concentrating on prison language and acts of violence that increase the stigma attaching to incarceration. Other books written by researchers report their observation and analysis of what they observed in the prison. Behind Bars tells the reader what it feels like to be behind bars. What exists between the lines is the emotion of those individuals who have suffered in prisons. They are not your knuckle dragging cavemen devoid of feelings and emotions, but instead a group of highly educated men reporting what prison is truly all about. I remember viewing on a prison menu the listing bar-b-que ribs. Providing for me the mental image and impression that they must eat pretty good here in prison. That image was dispelled when I walked into the prison dining hall and saw that the ribs were composite textured protein similar to McDonald's McRibs, just of inferior quality. When we observe something in writing like on the menu our minds produce images that may or may not be reality. This book presents the reality for those willing to take the time to read and think about what is being presented. Behind Bars presents the perspectives of various prisoners about their prison experience. We all see things from our own perspectives and few if any inmates experience prison in exactly the same way. However, this book provides at a minimum a basic understanding of life in prison today in the United States. Not only is this book worth the investment in time to read, but it is worth additional time to think about what is really being said both on and between the lines.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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