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Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade
     

Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade

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by Gabrielle Hecht
 

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ISBN-10: 0262526867

ISBN-13: 9780262526869

Pub. Date: 09/30/2014

Publisher: MIT Press

Uranium from Africa has long been a major source of fuel for nuclear power and atomic weapons, including the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. In 2003, after the infamous "yellow cake from Niger," Africa suddenly became notorious as a source of uranium, a component of nuclear weapons. But did that admit Niger, or any of Africa's other uranium-producing countries, to the

Overview

Uranium from Africa has long been a major source of fuel for nuclear power and atomic weapons, including the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. In 2003, after the infamous "yellow cake from Niger," Africa suddenly became notorious as a source of uranium, a component of nuclear weapons. But did that admit Niger, or any of Africa's other uranium-producing countries, to the select society of nuclear states? Does uranium itself count as a nuclear thing? In this book, Gabrielle Hecht lucidly probes the question of what it means for something--a state, an object, an industry, a workplace--to be "nuclear."

Hecht shows that questions about being nuclear--a state that she calls "nuclearity"--lie at the heart of today's global nuclear order and the relationships between "developing nations" (often former colonies) and "nuclear powers" (often former colonizers). Hecht enters African nuclear worlds, focusing on miners and the occupational hazard of radiation exposure. Could a mine be a nuclear workplace if (as in some South African mines) its radiation levels went undetected and unmeasured? With this book, Hecht is the first to put Africa in the nuclear world, and the nuclear world in Africa. By doing so, she remakes our understanding of the nuclear age.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262526869
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
09/30/2014
Pages:
480
Sales rank:
1,158,149
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 5.70(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Preface ix

Acronyms and Abbreviations xv

I Introduction: The Power of Nuclear Things 1

1 Proliferating Markets

Market Aversions 49

2 Imperial Projections and Market Devices 55

Resource Sovereignty 79

3 Colonial Enrichment 85

La Françafrique 107

4 The Price of Sovereignty 115

Nuclear Frankenstein 141

5 In the Shadows of the Market 147

Borderlands 171

II Nuclear Work

Nuclear Desertions 177

6 A History of Invisibility 183

Expatriates, Ethnology, and Ethnicity 213

7 Nuclearity at Work 219

Migrant Miners 251

8 Invisible Exposures 259

Against Uranium 287

9 Hopes for the Irradiated Body 293

10 Conclusion: Uranium in Africa 319

Appendix: Primary Sources and the (In)Visibilities of History 341

Publication History 351

Notes 353

Bibliography 407

Index 443

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Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago