Being Sloane Jacobs

( 12 )

Overview

Switching places with someone else has never been more fun than in this novel about following your dreams and finding your heart from the author of Meant to Be.

Meet Sloane Emily Jacobs: a seriously stressed-out figure skater who choked during junior nationals and isn't sure she's ready for a comeback. What she does know is that she'd give anything to escape the mass of misery that is her life.

Now meet Sloane Devon Jacobs, a spunky ice ...

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Overview

Switching places with someone else has never been more fun than in this novel about following your dreams and finding your heart from the author of Meant to Be.

Meet Sloane Emily Jacobs: a seriously stressed-out figure skater who choked during junior nationals and isn't sure she's ready for a comeback. What she does know is that she'd give anything to escape the mass of misery that is her life.

Now meet Sloane Devon Jacobs, a spunky ice hockey player who's been suspended from her team for too many aggressive hip checks. Her punishment? Hockey camp, now, when she's playing the worst she's ever played. If she messes up? Her life will be over.

When the two Sloanes meet by chance and decide to trade places for the summer, each girl thinks she's the lucky one. But it didn't occur to Sloane E. that while avoiding sequins and axels she might meet a hockey hottie—and Sloane D. never expected to run into a familiar (and very good-looking) face from home. It's not long before the Sloanes discover that convincing people you're someone else might be more difficult than being yourself. 

“Escaping from your own life and fitting perfectly—and hilariously imperfectly—into someone else’s? Who doesn’t fantasize about that? Morrill nails this unforgettable story full of twists and romance.”—Huntley Fitzpatrick, author of My Life Next Door

"A twist on the identity-swap that's both cozily familiar and fresh . . . . sweetly uplifting."—Publishers Weekly 

"Enjoyable."—Kirkus Reviews

“Sweet and satisfying.”—Booklist

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/02/2013
Morrill (Meant To Be) delivers a twist on the identity-swap that's both cozily familiar and fresh. Enter the two Sloane Jacobs: one is a pampered D.C. socialite who's faltering in the high-stakes world of ice skating; the other is a Philadelphia native whose hockey moves need sharpening and temper needs taming. When both Sloanes (who conveniently resemble one another) accidentally meet in Canada after being shipped off to summer camps to hone their respective skills, they hatch a plan to switch places, thus relieving them from the pressures dogging them at home. Their new environments present no shortage of challenges, but the Sloanes tackle them with doggedness and humility; believably detestable antagonists at each camp raise the stakes for both teens. Morrill includes some lighthearted romantic intrigue, but doesn't allow it to overshadow the girls' struggle to figure out who they are and what they want. The ending—sweetly uplifting and just a touch sappy—offers a pleasing resolution to a relatable coming-of-age story. A Paper Lantern Lit property. Ages 12–up. Agent: Stephen Barbara, Foundry Literary + Media. (Jan.)
VOYA, February 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 6) - Dianna Geers
Sloane Emily Jacobs is a figure skater whose parents send her to figure skating camp so she can return to competitive skating after a slump. Sloane Devon Jacobs must go to hockey camp to address anger issues that interfere with her hockey games. Sloane Emily and Sloane Devon fatefully meet in a hotel the night before their dreaded camps begin in this Parent Trap meets The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse type of story. Both girls decide to take each other’s place and pretend to be the other Sloane Jacobs. Both Sloanes believe that switching places will allow them to have fun trying something new rather than spending the dreaded days attending their scheduled camps. Sloane Emily’s life has always included luxury, and money is never an issue. The opposite is true for Sloane Devon. This juxtaposition creates additional drama for the Sloanes while they try to fill each other’s shoes—or skates. Told in chapters alternating between each Sloane, Being Sloane Jacobs is a light and fun read that looks into the worlds of figure skaters and hockey players, and also adds some romance. Readers will glide into the settings where both Sloanes are out of their comfort zones but work hard to find success and confidence. The weakest link in this story is the plausibility that there would be two girls sharing an unusual name who happen to be traveling to the same place discovering each other and successfully posing as each other without being detected. This is recommended for adolescent girls who like contemporary, light romance and for fans of Sarah Dessen. Reviewer: Dianna Geers; Ages 12 to 18.
Children's Literature - Barbara Troisi
A chance meeting in a Montreal hotel brings together two summer ice skating camp-bound sixteen-year-olds sharing the same name, facing the pressure of high expectations in the sports they play and escaping the turmoil of splintered family lives. A mix-up in the delivery of their luggage spurs privileged figure skater Sloane Emily Jacobs to embark on a daring adventure—trading roles by donning the wardrobe and skates of spunky ice hockey player, Sloane Devon Jacobs. Will the imposters last in each other’s skates? Author Morrill writes with perfect balance in dual first person narratives, switching back and forth between each character’s disguises. The main theme reveals each young woman stimulated with daring and challenging daily routines, transforming to the rigors of demanding and unfamiliar sports as they attempt to survive a new event. For hockey specialist Devon, it is learning the artistry of the waltz jump, single axel, and lift techniques as she leaps into a competitive figure skating performance with Andy, her doubles partner. Compare that with Emily’s slash bang hockey moves on the ice rink as she is forced to compete for a spot on the varsity blue team and impress a Boston University scout for a future college scholarship. The prank also had each girl contending with the flaws in the other’s family relationships. The fast paced plot finds the characters embracing the challenge, shrugging off personal issues, and gaining self-discovery in a newfound sport. The fun and fresh style of writing will capture teen reader’s attention as the debutantes and the cast of supporting characters learns to cope, adapt, compete, and trust in each other. Fun reading begins and ends in this unique title as the Sloanes glide onto the ice with unique perspectives and skate to fix up their lives. Reviewer: Barbara Troisi; Ages 12 up.
Kirkus Reviews
2013-11-02
An on-ice case of traded identities. When Sloane Emily Jacobs, the competitive figure skater from Washington, D.C., literally bumps into Sloane Devon Jacobs, the hockey jock from Philadelphia, the teens see it as more than a freaky coincidence; it's an opportunity. The chance meeting happens in a Montreal hotel lobby the evening before each teen is to report to an intensive sports camp for her own discipline. However, both girls are dreading their camps, which prompts Sloane Emily to suggest an identity swap. Hilarity ensues as Sloane Emily foregoes leotards and spins for body checking and slap shots, and Sloane Devon adopts toe picks and tights, leaving her sweatpants and swagger behind. Chapters alternate between Sloane Emily's and Sloane Devon's perspectives, giving each teen her own voice, personality and the space to unpack her heavy baggage from home, which includes family scandal, parental substance abuse and anger management issues. Although it feels far-fetched in some sections and certain small details of the identity switch don't quite line up, the two strong teens carry the text, providing an enjoyable, on-ice adventure. A thoughtful reminder that it is difficult to walk a mile in someone else's shoes--or in this case, skates. (Fiction. 12-16)
From the Publisher
“Escaping from your own life and fitting perfectly—and hilariously imperfectly—into someone else’s? Who doesn’t fantasize about that? Morrill nails this unforgettable story full of twists and romance.” —Huntley Fitzpatrick, author of My Life Next Door

Hello Giggles, January 11, 2013:
"Being Sloane Jacobs was super cute, super hilarious and a totally fun read."

Justine Magazine, Feb/March 2014:
"Charming and feisty characters (and crush-worthy guys!) make this a guaranteed-to-leave-you-smiling read."

Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2013:
"The two strong teens carry the text, providing an enjoyable, on-ice adventure. A thoughtful reminder that it is difficult to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes—or in this case, skates."

Booklist, January 1, 2014:
"Rather than skating on the surface of a time-honored plot twist, Morrill portrays each Sloane with the grit to cross-train in a new skating sport, the perseverance to withstand the competitors’ bullying and hijinks, the honesty to be true to new friends or at least struggle in the challenge, and the grace to respect each other’s futures...A sweet and satisfying resolution."

Publishers Weekly, December 2, 2013:
"Morrill (Meant To Be) delivers a twist on the identity-swap that's both cozily familiar and fresh...A relatable coming-of-age story."

School Library Journal, January 2014:
"Woven through the story are threads about family, friendship, identity, and romance...This coming-of-age novel sports good character development, especially in the talented doppelgängers."

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, February 2014:
"This is a feel-good story with flashes of honesty: the two girls learn to respect each other (and each other’s sport) without become besties, find themselves capable of surviving in unfamiliar territory without discovering latent genius, and ultimately make tentative peace with their families while knowing the road to healing will be long...This book will suit romantics who hadn’t thought to wonder what would happen if The Parent Trap met The Cutting Edge."

From the Hardcover edition.

School Library Journal
01/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Sloane Emily Jacobs is an Olympics-bound figure skater, but a fall shakes her self-confidence and the faith her wealthy, political parents have in her. The teen heads to an elite training camp to try to redeem herself and get away from her father-whom she recently discovered is having an affair. Sloane Devon Jacobs is a hockey player whose athletic career is put in jeopardy when her anger issues start to affect her performance on the ice. The girl's mother has recently been admitted to a rehab facility and her father isn't thriving at the single-dad thing. Her hockey coach orders her to attend a hockey camp to work through her temper problems. On their way to their different destinations, the two Sloane Jacobs meet because of a luggage mix-up at a Montreal hotel. Frustrated and disgruntled with their respective sports, they decide to switch places and try out each other's life. As with most "switching places" stories, the protagonists learn a lot about themselves as they live in someone else's skates. Woven through the story are threads about family, friendship, identity, and romance. Their ruse is discovered and the Sloanes are forced to switch back. While not the most original plot-and certainly one filled with unlikely coincidences-this coming-of-age novel is fairly well written and sports good character development, especially in the talented doppelgängers.—Liz Zylstra, County of Prince Edward Public Library, Picton, Ontario
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385741798
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/7/2014
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 248,584
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Lexile: 820L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 5.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

LAUREN MORRILL grew up in Maryville, Tennessee, where she was a short-term Girl Scout, a (not so) proud member of the marching band, and a troublemaking editor for the school newspaper. She graduated from Indiana University with a major in history and a minor in rock and roll and lives in Macon, Georgia, with her husband and their dog, Lucy. She is also the author of Meant to Be. When she's not writing, she spends a lot of hours on the track getting knocked around playing roller derby.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

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(1)

4 Star

(7)

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 1, 2014

    I realized as soon as I started reading Meant to Be that Lauren

    I realized as soon as I started reading Meant to Be that Lauren has a talent for fresh contemporary tales. I very much enjoyed Meant to Be, and I think Being Sloane Jacobs is even better. This fun story mixes the crazy identity swap hijinks of Parent Trap with the grit of athletic characters and a sassy style that's all Lauren.

    One of the reasons I rate BSJ so highly is that it's not your regular contemporary romance. Don't get me wrong; there are some cute boys and several tummy-butterfly-inducing scenes, but it's not the highlight of the novel. Instead, this is a novel that focuses on tough girls figuring out what they want AND going after it. Sloane Emily and Sloane Devon shine as double protagonists, each with a distinct voice and an individual set of problems and motivations, but they also prove that even very different teenage girls can still find common ground. Both SE and SD have major parent drama going on and both are shipped away for the summer so that their parents don't have to deal with them. Although it's pretty implausible that two teenage girls would ever actually be able to switch lives as (seemingly) easily as the Sloanes do, it really isn't surprising that they try, considering how disjointed they feel from their normal lives. The Sloanes are searching for something, anything to break the weirdness going on around them, but also, they're searching for their real identities. Is Sloane Emily simply the ice princess? The political darling? Is Sloan Devon just the rough-and-tumble bad girl on ice? The tough girl? By switching places, not only do the readers get to witness the girls in silly situations, but the girls discover themselves by doing things vastly different from what they're used to. It's incredibly entertaining and also pretty inspiring.

    I also like the guys, although they are minor characters. The boys are important for two reasons, and honestly, neither is romance (but again, the romance is so, so cute! See above-mentioned butterflies!). 1. Both Nando and Matt provide requisite body switch oopsie moments, which prompts the important discussions about trust and you're-not-who-I-thought-you-were (LITERALLY) moments, and 2. the guys provide additional examples of the many ways in which a person can change, even in a very short amount of time. Everybody has a past, and all four of these characters (SD, SE, Nando, and Matt) are trying in some way to move on from things in theirs. I really like the way Lauren writes them all almost as foils to one another, but again, she also focuses on the ways in which their similar. It speaks volumes to her character development that she carries this not only through her main characters, but also to the love interests and minor characters as well.

    Basically, Being Sloane Jacobs is a novel that will have you laughing the whole time you're reading. It's so much fun, and even if you aren't a sports superfan like I am, you'll enjoy all the sporty shenanigans on and off the ice. At the same time, you'll find a deeper connection with the characters and be able to sympathize with the Real Life demons chasing after them. Lauren's writing is strong, both witty and emotional, and her characters are utterly likeable and lifelike. It's clear she has improved so much from her debut to her second, and that only makes me more excited to see what she does for book #3, which I will definitely be reading.

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  • Posted July 8, 2014

    Man, I ended up putting this off for a long time because, well,

    Man, I ended up putting this off for a long time because, well, you know how it is. Too many things to read, not nearly enough time. But I ended up enjoying this one a lot more than I thought I would. It was definitely an adorable, fun read.

    I'm not saying anything about this seemed realistic. There is no way in heck anyone could actually pull this off. But I didn't let that bother me. Also, it was pretty predictable. But as long as you don't let that bother you either, this book was very enjoyable.

    Sloane Emily is a politician's daughter. Her mother is sending her to a figure skating camp so she can make her "comeback", but Sloane doesn't want to. Sloane Devon is a hockey player, who is getting sent to hockey camp for being too aggressive. So when the two Sloanes meet, they decide to just switch lives, because easy peasy nothing could go wrong with that.

    The writing of this one was very well-done. The story alternates between both girls, and Morrill did an excellent job of keeping them separate and individual. Both of them had unique voices, and it wasn't overwhelming, figuring out who was who and keeping track of characters. I also loved the descriptions of the skating and hockey. They were detailed and vivid, and added another dimension to the story that kept it from being just another sappy romance. 

    The romance between Matt and Sloane Emily was very Insta-lovey. There didn't seem to be much basis or reason to it. Sloane Devon and Nando were a bit better, being someone she has known before, but not much. But thankfully, the story wasn't solely focused on the romantic aspect. 

    The character growth is very apparent in this one. It was definitely fun to see the girls grow and realize who they each were. To see how they had grown and changed through each other's eyes was also interesting. 

    This is definitely a fun, cute read. It was adorable and entertaining, and I would definitely recommend it.

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  • Posted February 23, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I went into Being Sloane Jacobs knowing that it is a sports them

    I went into Being Sloane Jacobs knowing that it is a sports themed (yeay!) contemporary with a parent trap (minus the parents) plot. Initially the pace was a bit slow and I kind of scuffed at the two girls being on the extreme social class spectrum: the rich senator's daughter with a secret of her own and the girl with the absent mother and money problems. Those seem like typical stereotypes in YA books so I was a bit wary. However I have to say I started to get more interested in the novel once both Sloanes met and the planning commenced. I also loved that it was set in Montreal and gave me flashbacks of ice skating movies like Ice Princess! Both girls, personality wise, were so different and they had to impersonate the other for a full month. I loved how initially they kind of disliked each other but once they had a common goal, they started to accept the other and even became friends. I wish more YA books focused on friendships, it is such a beautiful thing to witness. Once the girls each went their opposite and separate ways, Sloane Emily to hockey camp and Sloane Devon to figure skating camp, it was fun to read about how they coped with the other's sports (especially since they mocked each other's sports). I found myself reading 100 pages in a sitting, not even realizing i've read this much. I loved the friendships they created with other people, such as Sloane Devon and Aaron as well as Sloane Emily and Cameron. The romance, and both love interests in this book aren't really a focus of the book. I can't really say I swooned for either one but I didn't care. I cared more about both girls solving their own problems, the pressure from their families, and finally getting to the point where they realize the reason they started their sports was because they loved and enjoyed doing it. It kind of reminds me of a situation I was in with my schooling and how I finally took a step back and remembered the reasons behind the path I'm on and if it is even the right one. I think everyone nowadays gets caught up with expectations and needing to prove themselves that barely any people do things that they truly love. Sorry for going all serious but I just think that's the message in this book. Both Sloanes might have had to do a crazy thing to finally reach that realization, but I applaud them both for finally deciding to do something about it. I definitely recommend it to YA contemporary fans. I have to say I enjoyed this more than Morrill's previous book Meant to Be.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    %*57468*

    Gyxhd $7194$8

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Plot spoilers

    Bn, please do something to these plot spoilers who brag about getting the book for free, then proceed to tell every detail about the book. They ruin it for other readers who may want to read the book. Cant they be banned or fined or something?

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  • Posted January 20, 2014

    3.5/5 stars Being Sloane Jacobs ended up being a really cute r

    3.5/5 stars Being Sloane Jacobs ended up being a really cute read once I got into it. It was light-hearted, sweet, and really engaging. In the beginning when both Sloanes were together I did have trouble distinguishing who was narrating. However, once the girls went their separate ways and their storylines began to develop I didn't have as much trouble.

    I admit, I liked Sloane Emily a bit better than Sloane Devon. Sloane Emily puts a lot of pressure on herself when it comes to ice skating. However, while she enjoys skating, she is not happy with her life. She has a lot of familial problems and instead of dealing with them, she runs from them. To the public eye Sloane Emily's family is perfect. Little do they know, it's all a façade. Her father is a Senator and he and his daughter have a rather uncomfortable relationship. Sloane Emily discovered something about her father that could destroy not only their family, but really taint his career as well. Being sent to a special skating academy in Montreal sounds great for Sloane Emily- anything to get her away from her family.

    Sloane Devon on the other hand has a much different family situation. She lives with her dad, but her mom is not currently in the picture. Sloane Devon does not like to discuss her, but we do find out she had a problem with alcoholism. Sloane Devon is definitely the tomboy of the two Sloanes. She is a hockey player, but has been having trouble with her performance lately. She hesitates when it comes to shooting the puck and ends up choking. She ends up also going to Montreal to play hockey for the summer. Sloane Devon is a bit rough around the edges and doesn't hesitate to get in fights or call things like they are. When she first meets Sloane Emily, she thinks her to be nothing more than a pampered pretty princess.

    However, after the two decided to swap places we really get to see them embrace their new roles and do what they have to in order to make their switch work. Switching places really makes these girls think about what they truly want to do. Sure, they are pretending to be someone else, but in reality they are the ones that have to adapt and learn how to do their new sport so they look like they belong.

    Sloane Emily really embraces the freedom hockey has to offer. Ice skating is all about rigidity and discipline and she finally can eat what she wants and enjoy herself for once. She meets a guy named Matt, who is also a hockey player, but has a serious reputation as a player. He is friendly to Sloane E and wants to get to know her, but she has already heard the rumors circulating and she won't let herself fall into THAT trap. I actually really liked Matt's character. He was sweet and fun and didn't give up on Sloane E, even after finding out the truth.

    Sloane Devon has ALOT of work to do to fit in as an ice skater. She has the roommate from you know where and must put up with being belittled and put down by her. Thankfully, she makes some friends of her own (Andy in particular). I loved Andy! He was great. He loved how Sloane D didn't take her roommate Ivy's crap. He ended up being a great friend after he found out the truth as he helped teach her how to skate pairs. Nando is Sloane D's love interest, but we didn't get a whole lot of interaction between them. Their relationship felt rather underdeveloped to me and we just didn't get enough time with these two.

    Overall, this was a cute read and I enjoyed watching the two girls try something new and do their best at it. Both girls have their family issues and I felt they resolved them in the best way they knew how. It was quite fun to watch the two try to figure out how to use their own knowledge on the ice to succeed, even when it seemed hopeless. I am looking forward to reading Lauren's Meant To Be soon!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 16, 2014

    Hockey! Figure skating! Montreal! Being Sloane Jacobs is a book

    Hockey! Figure skating! Montreal!

    Being Sloane Jacobs is a book with a surprising amount of emotional depth. With the premise that two girls, both named Sloane Jacobs and look enough alike, arrive in Montreal for summer intensives in their respective winter sports of choice—Sloane Emily, figure skating; Sloane Devon, hockey—meet in a hotel lobby, and plan to switch places for the summer it’s easy to get caught up in the various hijinks and awkward moments that ensue. Think It Takes Two and The Parent Trap—cute, fun movies full of identity capers. But what I really enjoyed about Being Sloane Jacobs is that author Lauren Morrill provided a lot more than two girls playing with the system. The emotional depth she provided to each Sloane and the reasons why they both are willing to spend their summers training for a winter sport they don’t play is what really makes this story shine.
    I do tend to be more on the girly side (not to mention my fervent love for figure skating), and was immediately drawn to Sloane Emily’s story of a seemingly perfect posh upbringing and the chip on her shoulder because of it. But I have to say that I really enjoyed Sloane Devon’s story as well. As a rough-and-tumble hockey player from a not-great neighborhood in Philly and with an alcoholic mother in rehab, I really felt for Sloane Devon and, though I did not understand her willingness to spend a summer figure skating as much as I understood Sloane Emily’s to play hockey, loved her journey through the book.

    Though I did enjoy this book, I don’t necessarily love the premise and construct—I find it too hard to suspend my belief that something like this could actually, really happen successfully. I know that it makes sense theoretically—you have the same name, you look alike, you’re far away from your family and friends—but there’s something about the whole thing that makes me feel like no one would ever really get away with it, especially when the girls at the center of the story are extremely competitive athletes who excel in their fields.

    Nevertheless, Being Sloane Jacobs is a really fun, cute story that packs an emotional punch and doesn’t always give in to the conventions of the premise, which makes me a happy reader. (Hooray eschewing conventions!) As we all gear up to cheer on our respective national teams during Sochi (WINTER OLYMPICS ARE THE BEST OLYMPICS), this is the perfect read to pick up!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

       I picked to read Being Sloane Jacobs because it was an advanc

       I picked to read Being Sloane Jacobs because it was an advanced copy available in exchange for my honest review on Netgalley and not only is the cover adorable, but the synopsis really intrigued me. I love watching hockey and pretty much automatically pick up anything to do with hockey or with figure skating in ya fiction. I have also read Meant to Be by Lauren Morrill and enjoyed it, so she is an author that I watch anything that comes out by her. 
         I was not disappointed, because the characters swept me away. At first it was a little confusing with two main characters with the same first and last name, but they had distinct voices and they were pretty radically different. Though, the more I read, the more that I found they had in common. They come from different home types-rich versus poor, they play different sports- figure skating versus hockey, they dress differently, look at the world in different ways, have different temperments and have different upbringings. But they both face pressure of expectations, family dysfunction, and confidence and really understanding if they love what they do or if they are just good at it. Or they were. Sloane Emily had a big fall in her last competition and is just now re-entering the scene and Sloane Devon has been choking when it comes to scoring goals. 
         I loved the dual perspective and wasn't really confused going back and forth most of the time. When the roomies first entered the picture it was confusing adjusting to them switching places and new people being on the scene, but I quickly settled into their settings. 
         While I questioned the plausibility of them pulling off actually switching places, I completely love the concept and the execution. I think that it was believable that some of their skills easily transferred and they did have issues, I think that them excelling and holding up the other's reputation, that is where the ground gets shaky. But Lauren convinced me with her writing, and with the friends that came along and helped them. 
          Both discovered a lot about themselves, gained a new perspectives on other sports and what they go through. They also had friends that helped them discover who they were and where they fit into things, and the overall character development was good. Sloane Emily gained more confidence in herself and ability to stand up for herself, and Sloane Jacob filed down some rough edges and learned to appreciate beauty more. 
         Each Sloane had a romance that I think was well placed, and I especially like how supportive they were and that they brought out another side, or helped them to see both their and the opposite sport in new ways. I like how Sloane Emily's love interest had to prove himself and it was fun watching him woo her and both of them open up to each other. Sloane Devon's guy was actually someone she knew before, but they both saw each other in new lights. 
        I appreciated how the family issues weren't magically dissolved at the end, but that there was hard work and effort being put into healing the families. 
        The epilogue was sweet, and although things were wrapped up really well, it gave me hope that there might be more time back in these characters' lives but I can't be sure. 












    Bottom Line: Overall fun contemporary that has depth. 

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  • Posted January 11, 2014

    I had read the description for this book so long ago that when I

    I had read the description for this book so long ago that when I started reading, I had no idea what it was about. I wasn’t worried through. After adoring Meant to Be to pieces, I already knew that I loved Lauren’s writing style and assumed this book would be filled with just as much cuteness as Meant to Be. Annnnnnd… I was right.  :)




    After only a few chapters I couldn’t help but compare this to The Parent Trap, which was only my favorite movie as a child! Now, I know I’m going to date myself here, but I’m NOT speaking about the Lindsay Lohan movie. I’m talking about the classic version with Haley Mills. I must have seen it at least 20 times and I know every word by heart. So to be reminded of this wonderful childhood memory right off the bat gave me such a warm and fuzzy feeling that I was already hooked.




    The whole idea of this story is a bit silly, but that just made it more fun for me. Sloane Emily Jacobs and Sloane Devon Jacobs couldn’t be more different. The only thing they have in common is their name… literally. Sloane Devon is a hockey player with a big future, almost as big as her temper, yet she’s having trouble shooting the puck. Sloane Jacobs is a figure skater who was “the best” before an injury incapacitated her for a while. She’s now back, but not sure she wants to be. They are both “punished” by having to attend a camp in Montreal; Sloane Emily, a figuring skating camp, and Sloane Devon, one for hockey. After colliding with each other in a hotel, they decide to switch places. They both skate, so how hard can it really be to learn the other sport. Hehe… that’s where the fun begins.




    Yes, this story is predictable. And yes, it’s super silly and over the top at times. But it’s adorable. I really enjoyed it, and it was exactly what I was looking for. If you’re in the mood for a fun read that you don’t have to think too much about, and you don’t mind not taking it too seriously, I’d say give this one a go! With a bit of romance and snarky mean girl drama thrown into the story, it’s sure to please almost any contemporary reader.  :)

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  • Posted January 9, 2014

    I have to be honest and say that it¿s my first experience with a

    I have to be honest and say that it’s my first experience with a book from Lauren Morrill and I had no idea what to expect when I picked up this book but I was surprised. While the plot slightly unbelievable the story was a quick and fun read about second chances and rediscovering yourself.




    What I loved the most was the way the author managed to make each girl’s voice unique. Each Sloane had similar reasons for agreeing to switch lives, but even so, they were very different girls with very different lives, and that was portrayed well. The alternating POV kept my attention and was well written. I easily connected with both girls and enjoyed the journey they went through. 




    I don’t want to say too much about the plot because it’s one of those fun novels that you need to read on your own! Pick it up you won’t regret it!

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  • Posted January 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    After reading and falling in love with Lauren Morrill¿s Meant to

    After reading and falling in love with Lauren Morrill’s Meant to Be in 2012, I was thrilled when I was approved for an ARC of Being Sloane Jacobs. I adore Lauren’s writing style and her character development and just knew I would adore Being Sloane Jacobs. I was absolutely right. 

    Being Sloane Jacobs is the story of two girls with the same name, but very different backgrounds, interests and attitudes. Sloane Emily Jacobs is a girlie girl figure skater. Sloane Devon Jacobs is a tomboy ice hockey player. Their paths cross in an unexpected way and they build a friendship. As they do have a strong resemblance to each other and neither of them is particularly happy in their current situation, they also decide to swap lives for awhile. Both of them are heading off to a training camp, so it should be relatively easy to fool people who don’t know them. They educate each other about the other’s hobby and go their separate ways. Is the storyline a long shot? Sure. Did that stop it from being absolutely adorable and charming? Not even close. 

    I loved the characters in this book! Both Sloanes were wonderful. They were real and easy to connect with. Because the book is written from the perspective of both Sloanes, the reader gets a great glimpse inside each of their heads and really comes to understand the struggles they’re each going through on and off the ice. The love interests in the story, Matt and Nando, were both swoony and adorable. The romance was believable and sweet in that teenage “first love” way. It progressed naturally and the couples were a great fit. It all just left me with a huge smile on my face.

    If you’re a fan of young adult contemporaries, figure skating and happily ever afters, you’ll adore this book as much as I did. It was fun, not overly angst, utterly charming book. I can’t wait for more from Lauren Morrill. She’s rapidly becoming one of my favorite YA contemporary authors. 

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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