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Belinda
     

Belinda

2.5 6
by Maria Edgeworth
 

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Maria Edgeworth won the admiration of contemporaries Jane Austen and Walter Scott and later writers such as Thackeray. In BELINDA (1801) she tackles issues of gender and race in a manner at once comic and thought-provoking, as her heroine Belinda braves the perils of the marriage market and learns to think for herself.

Overview

Maria Edgeworth won the admiration of contemporaries Jane Austen and Walter Scott and later writers such as Thackeray. In BELINDA (1801) she tackles issues of gender and race in a manner at once comic and thought-provoking, as her heroine Belinda braves the perils of the marriage market and learns to think for herself.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
In these two volumes published in 1801 and 1795, respectively, Edgeworth pokes fun at London upper crust. In addition to their humor, these volumes are noteworthy for their early feminist leanings. These Everyman editions include scholarly introductions, textual notes, and a chronology of the author's life. A big package for a small price.
From the Publisher
"A superbly edited text and an informative introduction."—Gregory Maertz, St. John's University

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026381128
Publisher:
Printed for R. Hunter , etc.
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
374 KB

Meet the Author

Although born in England in 1768, Maria Edgeworth was raised in Ireland from a young age after the death of her mother. After nearly losing her sight at age fourteen, Edgeworth was tutored at home by her father, helping to run their estate and taking charge of her younger siblings. Over the course of her life she collaborated and published books with her father, and produced many more of her own adult and children’s works, including such classics as Castle Rackrent, Patronage, Belinda, Ormond and The Absentee. Edgeworth spent her entire life on the family estate, but kept up friendships and correspondences with her contemporaries Sir Walter Scott and Lord Byron, and her writing had a profound influence upon Jane Austen and William Makepeace Thackeray. Edgeworth was outspoken on the issues of poverty, women’s rights, and racial inequalities. During the beginnings of famine in Ireland, Edgeworth worked in relief and support of the sick and destitute. She died in 1849 at the age of 81.

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Belinda 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not get passed the guessed script. I spent more time trying to figure it out than understanding the nature of the storyline.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this story. It was interesting to see the story mentioned by Jane Austin and to see that it still held up after 200 years.
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