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BEN-HUR: A TALE OF THE CHRIST (All Time Bestselling Novel) by LEW WALLACE [Bestselling American Novel Adapted as Record 11 Academy Award Winning Movie w/ Charlton Heston - Matched only by Lord of the Rings and Titanic] ALL-TIME BESTSELLER CHRISTIAN NOVEL
     

BEN-HUR: A TALE OF THE CHRIST (All Time Bestselling Novel) by LEW WALLACE [Bestselling American Novel Adapted as Record 11 Academy Award Winning Movie w/ Charlton Heston - Matched only by Lord of the Rings and Titanic] ALL-TIME BESTSELLER CHRISTIAN NOVEL

3.7 97
by Lew Wallace
 

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BEN-HUR: A TALE OF THE CHRIST
(All Time Bestselling Novel)
by LEW WALLACE

[Bestselling American Novel Adapted as Record 11 Academy Award Winning Movie w/ Charlton Heston - Matched only by Lord of the Rings and Titanic]

ALL-TIME BESTSELLER CHRISTIAN NOVEL


ABOUT THE BOOK

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is the highly

Overview

BEN-HUR: A TALE OF THE CHRIST
(All Time Bestselling Novel)
by LEW WALLACE

[Bestselling American Novel Adapted as Record 11 Academy Award Winning Movie w/ Charlton Heston - Matched only by Lord of the Rings and Titanic]

ALL-TIME BESTSELLER CHRISTIAN NOVEL


ABOUT THE BOOK

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is the highly acclaimed novel by Lew Wallace. The novel was a phenomenal best-seller upon original publication, surpassing Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the best-selling American novel and retained this distinction until the 1936 publication of Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind. Book sales then surpassed Gone with the Wind, following the release of the highly successful 1959 MGM film adaptation; the film winning eleven Academy Awards. The book was the first work of fiction to be blessed by a Pope, receiving benediction from Pope Leo XIII.

The story tells of the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, Jewish prince and merchant in Jerusalem at the beginning of the 1st century. Ben-Hur's childhood friend Messala arrives back home as an ambitious commanding officer of the Roman legions. They come to realize how much they have changed and now hold very different views and aspirations. During a military parade a tile falls from the roof of Judah's house and barely misses the Roman governor. Although Messala knows that they are not guilty, he condemns the Ben-Hur family. Without trial, Judah is sent to work until death as a Roman galley slave, his mother and sister are thrown into prison and all the family property is confiscated. Through fate and good fortune, Judah survives and manages to return to Jerusalem, to seek revenge against his one-time friend and redeem his family. Running in parallel with Ben-Hur's narrative is the unfolding story of Jesus, who comes from the same region and is a similar age, mirroring themes of betrayal, conviction and redemption. Ben-Hur witnesses and is inspired by the rise of the Christ figure and his following who challenge Roman tyranny and talk of keys to a greater kingdom.

The name "Ben Hur" derives from the Hebrew for "Son of white linen".


EXCERPT

Afraid to speak the while, the mother listened, discerning the matter plainly. Judah had gone to the palace on the Market-place, allured by love of a playmate whom he thought to find exactly as he had been at the parting years before; a man met him, and, in place of laughter and references to the sports of the past, the man had been full of the future, and talked of glory to be won, and of riches and power. Unconscious of the effect, the visitor had come away hurt in pride, yet touched with a natural ambition; but she, the jealous mother, saw it, and, not knowing the turn the aspiration might take, became at once Jewish in her fear. What if it lured him away from the patriarchal faith? In her view, that consequence was more dreadful than any or all others. She could discover but one way to avert it, and she set about the task, her native power reinforced by love to such degree that her speech took a masculine strength and at times a poet's fervor.

"There never has been a people," she began, "who did not think themselves at least equal to any other; never a great nation, my son, that did not believe itself the very superior. When the Roman looks down upon Israel and laughs, he merely repeats the folly of the Egyptian, the Assyrian, and the Macedonian; and as the laugh is against God, the result will be the same."

Her voice became firmer.

"There is no law by which to determine the superiority of nations; hence the vanity of the claim, and the idleness of disputes about it. A people risen, run their race, and die either of themselves or at the hands of another, who, succeeding to their power, take possession of their place, and upon their monuments write new names; such is history. If I were called upon to symbolize God and man in the simplest form, I would draw a straight line and a circle, and of the line I would say, 'This is God, for he alone moves forever straightforward,' and of the circle, 'This is man--such is his progress.' I do not mean that there is no difference between the careers of nations; no two are alike. The difference, however, is not, as some say, in the extent of the circle they describe or the space of earth they cover, but in the sphere of their movement, the highest being nearest God.

"To stop here, my son, would be to leave the subject where we began. Let us go on. There are signs by which to measure the height of the circle each nation runs while in its course. By them let us compare the Hebrew and the Roman.

"The simplest of all the signs is the daily life of the people. Of this I will only say, Israel has at times forgotten God, while the Roman never knew him; consequently comparison is not possible."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013032224
Publisher:
Christian Miracle Foundation Press
Publication date:
12/11/2011
Series:
Bestseller Christian Novel and Christian Fiction | Ben-Hur by Lew Wallace | Academy Award Oscar Movies | Nook NOOKBook
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
299,130
File size:
666 KB

Meet the Author

Lewis "Lew" Wallace (April 10, 1827 – February 15, 1905) was an American lawyer, governor, Union general in the American Civil War, politician and author best remembered for his historical novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ.

While serving as governor, Wallace completed the novel that made him famous: Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880). It grew to be the one of the best-selling American novels of all time. The book has never been out of print and has been filmed four times.

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Ben-Hur (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 97 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I decided to read only well-written and important works during this Millenial Year. I picked up the 'Focus on the Family' publication of Ben Hur as I was exiting our library. I did not know I had just picked up the novel of my life. This book is suplative in every way-wonderful plot, incredible characterizations, historically accurate, and even life changing. General Lew Wallace wrote this incredible work in 1880, and I don't believe this novel could be written by today's writers. There are some of the most perfectly written sentences I have ever read, every line comparable to fine wine that must be sipped slowly for best effect rather than gulped like present-day works. It took me a full month of pleasure to finish this fine work. It can be enjoyed by Christian and non-Christian alike, and will cause those who believe to believe even stronger, while those unfamiliar or doubtful of the Good News of Christ will be quickened spiritually. This book is gigantic in scope and life changing in effect. By the way, I've never seen the movie, but I'm going to check it tonight>>>
Roger Beede More than 1 year ago
I loved this book from beginning to end! It is much better than the movie version!
ML100 More than 1 year ago
Reading the book has filled in the movie. I really appreciated the author's use of language and sentence structure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though the movie Ben Hur is good the book is even better
SANDYSZ More than 1 year ago
What can one say about a book that is a classic. (Nothing)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although I loved the story, the description at some points seemed too heavy and I started skimming over certain parts. Also there are many errors in the text and it was very difficult to read. But overall a great story that I would recommend:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THE BOOK IS FULL OF MISSPELLED WORDS AND WEIRD SYMBOLS THAT HAVE NO MEANING WHAT SO EVER.IT IS HARD TO GET THE FULL MEANING OF THE BOOK. WOULD NOT RECOMMEND ANYONE READ THIS PARTICULAR BOOK.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read it a long time a go, but this time I appreciated it more. So beautiful!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The movie is alot better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is such a cool story. I do agree that it is slow though
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Educative
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book as a free nook book. It's a "classic" so I figured, "why not?" This book is way beyond overly-descriptive. I found myself actually talking to my book, "I don't really care what the camels are wearing! Get on with it!" The main character of the story isn't even mentioned until page 62 of 435. It took me about 2-3 weeks of forcing myself to read this. If it had been written in 100 pages it probably would have been tolerable. Save yourself some time and watch the old movie version starring Charlton Heston.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My friend's great great grandfather wrote this book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool!luved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one case where the movie is better than the book. The book bogs down quite a bit in the middle and I found myself saying, "Just get on with it". Still a classic and I can at least say I read it, but the movie is a better, a more thrilling adaptation that stays true to the book.
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