Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds

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Overview

“Bamboo is flexible, bending with the wind but never breaking, capable of adapting to any circumstance. It suggests resilience, meaning that we have the ability to bounce back even from the most difficult times. . . . Your ability to thrive depends, in the end, on your attitude to your life circumstances. Take everything in stride with grace, putting forth energy when it is needed, yet always staying calm ...

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Overview

“Bamboo is flexible, bending with the wind but never breaking, capable of adapting to any circumstance. It suggests resilience, meaning that we have the ability to bounce back even from the most difficult times. . . . Your ability to thrive depends, in the end, on your attitude to your life circumstances. Take everything in stride with grace, putting forth energy when it is needed, yet always staying calm inwardly.”
—Ping Fu’s “Shanghai Papa”
 
Ping Fu knows what it’s like to be a child soldier, a factory worker, and a political prisoner. To be beaten and raped for the crime of being born into a well-educated family. To be deported with barely enough money for a plane ticket to a bewildering new land. To start all over, without family or friends, as a maid, waitress, and student.
 
Ping Fu also knows what it’s like to be a pioneering software programmer, an innovator, a CEO, and Inc. magazine’s Entrepreneur of the Year. To be a friend and mentor to some of the best-known names in tech­nology. To build some of the coolest new products in the world. To give speeches that inspire huge crowds. To meet and advise the president of the United States.
 
It sounds too unbelievable for fiction, but this is the true story of a life in two worlds.
 
Born on the eve of China’s Cultural Revolution, Ping was separated from her family at the age of eight. She grew up fighting hunger and humiliation and shielding her younger sister from the teenagers in Mao’s Red Guard. At twenty-five, she found her way to the United States; her only resources were $80 in traveler’s checks and three phrases of English: thank you, hello, and help.
 
Yet Ping persevered, and the hard-won lessons of her childhood guided her to success in her new home­land. Aided by her well-honed survival instincts, a few good friends, and the kindness of strangers, she grew into someone she never thought she’d be—a strong, independent, entrepreneurial leader. A love of problem solving led her to computer science, and Ping became part of the team that created NCSA Mosaic, which became Netscape, the Web browser that forever changed how we access information. She then started a company, Geomagic, that has literally reshaped the world, from personalizing prosthetic limbs to repair­ing NASA spaceships.
 
Bend, Not Break depicts a journey from imprisonment to freedom, and from the dogmatic anticapitalism of Mao’s China to the high-stakes, take-no-prisoners world of technology start-ups in the United States. It is a tribute to one woman’s courage in the face of cruelty and a valuable lesson on the enduring power of resilience.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this outstanding testament to the resilience of the human spirit, Ping takes readers on a journey both heartbreaking and inspiring. Eight-year-old Ping is living a privileged life in Shanghai with her intellectual father and loving mother when her world explodes during the Cultural Revolution. With her family seen as an enemy of the state, they are forcibly split up, and Ping is placed in a meager camp with her four-year-old sister. After years of torture as a child, including a brutal gang rape at age 10, Ping is briefly detained after her college thesis on infanticide ends up in the hands of politicians. An exiled Ping immigrates to the U.S. in 1984 with just in her pocket. In 1988, she graduated with a degree in computer science from the University of California at San Diego and worked on the team that created NCSA Mosaic, later known as the Netscape Web browser. Next, Ping and her husband founded Geomagic, a 3D software company, which has counted Mattel and Boeing as its clients. Ping's eloquent prose and remarkable attitude shine through in every word—and her compelling story will remind more than one reader to be thankful for what they have. Agent: Laura Yorke, Carol Mann Agency. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews
A Chinese-American businesswoman's memoir of exile, torture, immigration and, ultimately, astounding success. With the assistance of Huffington Post blogger Fox (Fortytude: Making the Next Decades the Best Years of Your Life, 2011, etc.), Ping Fu, founder of Geomagic, a 3D digital-reality solution company, reveals the inspiring story of her life. Until age 8, Ping and her intellectual, doting parents lived comfortably in Shanghai. That existence was blown apart by the Cultural Revolution, during which her family was regarded as an enemy of the state. During the 1960s and '70s, Ping and her younger sister were confined to a camp where she endured years of vicious torture that included being gang-raped when she was 10. Despite receiving no formal education between the ages of 8 and 18, she went on to attend college, but her thesis, on infanticide, landed her in hot water with politicians. Exiled, she arrived in the United States with less than $100 and English so limited she could only say, "hello," "help" and "thank you." Ping's early years in America were peppered with encounters that ran the gamut from surreal (she was kidnapped at the airport upon her arrival) to quotidian (she studied relentlessly). In 1988, she earned a degree in computer science and joined the team that created NCSA Mosaic, later known as Netscape. She and her husband subsequently founded Geomagic. Ping advises women aspiring to be in a position similar to hers to "[t]hink about moving forward to make personal or social progress, rather than moving higher to gain a superior position." The book reflects the tone of its author: clear, honest and unassuming.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591846819
  • Publisher: Portfolio Trade
  • Publication date: 11/26/2013
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 202,280
  • Product dimensions: 5.57 (w) x 8.41 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Ping Fu is the founder and CEO of Geomagic, a 3D digital reality solution company. She earned an M.S. in computer science at the University of Illinois and worked at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and AT&T Bell Labs. She is a member of President Obama’s National Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship and a board member of Long Now Foundation. She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

MeiMei Fox
is an author and book editor who also blogs regularly for the Huffington Post.

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Table of Contents

Author's Note ix

1 Three Friends of Winter 1

2 Behind Every Closed Door Is an Open Space 35

3 I Am Precious 73

4 Blood Is Thicker Than Water 107

5 Everybody Is Somebody 137

6 Who Can Say What Is Good or Bad? 169

7 The Number One Strategy Is Retreat 199

8 Life Is a Mountain Range 235

Epilogue: The World Isn't Flat; It's 3D 263

Acknowledgments 275

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

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(11)

4 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    Ping Fu has some questions to answer based on her "non-fict

    Ping Fu has some questions to answer based on her "non-fiction" memoir.
    The following is an english translation of an article written by a famous Myth-Buster in Chinese internet community: Fang ZhouZI. Fang is 
    a freelance writer who specialize on cracking fraud among academic in China.  Forbes recent article on Ping Fu and her book turned
    viral and caught Fang's attention. Here are some poings Fang made based on Ping's "story":
    First up, Fu's claim she was sent to a labour camp at age 8 or 9 with her younger sister where for the duration of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) she was kept apart from her parents, brainwashed, starved, tortured, gang-raped, forced into child labour and deprived of education.




    Fu would have been a minor throughout the Cultural Revolution, Fang points out, never mind her younger sister; children that young being forced into labour camps was unheard of: "I haven't seen this in anyone else's memoirs of the Cultural Revolution, it must have been a tragic experience had only by Ping Fu herself."




    As for Fu's claim of being deprived of education those ten years, Fang points out that in 1977 - when the holding of university entrance examinations resumed and Fu was accepted by Suzhou University - not only were all applicants get pre-screened for eligibility, but also less than 5 per cent of applicants were accepted that year. "Was she a prodigy?," he asks.




    In 2010, Fu told NPR (13:30 here) she witnessed Red Guards execute one teacher by tying each limb to a separate horse and dismembering her by having each horse run simultaneously in a separate outward direction, done specifically to frighten the kids into submission.




    Of all the different cruel ways people were killed during the Cultural Revolution, Fang writes, with many beaten to death or buried alive, dismemberment using four horses was unheard of, except for Ping Fu's having said so. She says all the other kids in the labour camp were assembled to watch this, he asks, so why didn't even a single one of them step forward to say they'd witnessed such a rare and inhumane thing? Were all the other children killed?




    Getting technical, Fang adds dismemberment by horse sounds easy, but would have been quite difficult to pull off even if Red Guards had been able to find four horses trained to do such things. "Would Red Guards go to such great lengths just to scare these kids?"




    Several hundred years ago there was rumoured to have been dismemberment by five horses, Fang goes on, but in fact that was just a legend:




    Criminals have been dismembered using horse carriages, which is obviously easy to carry out, but not using horses themselves.




    Dismemberment by carriage has been carried out several times in Chinese history, he says, but records of it were kept each time and the practice died out hundreds of years ago. Dismemberment by four horses was used in ancient times in the West, and if China's Red Guards actually resumed the practice in Nanjing in the 1960s, making that the first time in Chinese history a living human was dismembered using four horses, and Ping Fu is the only person to publicly acknowledge having witnessed this, then shouldn't those who research incidents of torture call her to talk? Shouldn't the victims and other eyewitnesses also be sorted out?




    In an interview with Forbes, Fu also appears to have claimed to have written her undergrad thesis at Suzhou University on the practice of female infanticide in rural China and that she her research received nationwide press converage at the time. In 2005, speaking to Inc., Fu went on to explain that after she submitted her undergrad thesis in 1980, her findings were later covered by Shanghai's Wen Hui Bao newspaper and later by also by People's Daily, resulting in condemnation from around the world, sanctions imposed by the UN, and Fu getting tossed into prison.




    Fang says he went back and checked People's Daily archives for the period Fu says her research would've been published there and found nothing regarding female infanticide in rural China:




    In fact anyone with a bit of political common sense knows that People's Daily at that time was full of nothing but glorious and wonderful news and it's impossible anything affecting China's image so much as this would've received coverage.




    As for the UN imposing sanctions on China, does she not know that China, as a member of the UN Security Council, also has the power to veto motions? Why does nobody else in China know that the UN placed sanctions on China in 1981? And how does Ping Fu know that?




    Regarding Fu's claim to NPR she was walking on campus when a black bag was suddenly thrown over her head and she was stuffed into a car before being arrested:




    This is like a scene from a gangster film. In 1981, was there actually any university campus in China where the Public Security Bureau would have had any reservation about taking away a university student?




    On Fu's claim she was then held three days and narrowly avoided being sentenced to reform through labour when authorities decided instead to send her into exile:




    Getting exiled to the United States to study just for writing a thesis with negative content, could there be anything more wonderful in this world? The only people China sentences to be deported are foreigners. The practice of sending dissidents off to the United States didn't begin until the 1990s, and that was only reserved for the most high-profile of dissidents.




    Ping Fu was an unheard-of university student at the time, which makes being deported off to the United States to study a true miracle. Being allowed to pay your own way to study in the United States in the early 1980s was remarkably difficult to achive; without special connections overseas, it would've been impossible.




    Noting Fu told Forbes she arrived in the United States knowing only three words of English, Fang remembered hearing the same anecdote in interviews she'd given to other media, so he went back and checked and found different sets of those first three words:




    Inc.: Please, thank you, help;
    Bend, Not Break: Thank you, hello, help;
    NPR: Thank you, help, excuse me.




    Not only that:




    According to the Inc. report Ping Fu arrived at Suzhou University wanting to study engineering or business, but the Party assigned her to study English. How then could she have only learned just three words? Even if she wasn't an English major, English was still one of the core courses. And even if she was a poor student, how is it possible she was only able to remember the three most basic words in English?




    All these claims are only good enough to fool laowai who don't know anything about China. Ping Fu knows that, which is why she's so much more honest when speaking with Chinese.
    [...]
    At the time, Chinese international students had many ways of being able to stay there in the United States. One of those was to fabricate bizarre tales of having faced persecution in China and apply for political asylum. It didn't matter how fantastic you made your experiences, Americans would still believe them to be true. Some people told so many lies they even started believing it themselves.

    19 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    Sympathy towards one's tragic experience and admiration for the

    Sympathy towards one's tragic experience and admiration for the extraordinary comeback often make people want to believe in stories like this. But as the recently disgraced Lance Armstrong can tell you, no matter how sympathetic and extraordinary your story is, it only matters when it is TRUE.




    I can understand those who gave 5 stars to this book. For a lay US reader who has not lived in the 80's China, every bit of this story sounds so authentic. It matched up with every depiction of that era that people hear or see the in media. Poverty, hunger, persecution, humiliation, and rape - all the elements of a third world revolution odyssey were packed in this book, what's not to believe? And I would have no trouble believing that this book tops the best seller on amazon after the Forbes magazine and the daily beast editor-in-chief Tina Brown gave raving review on this book.




    However, as any person who has lived in that era of China can tell you, Ping's story is simply impossible to be true. Thanks to the internet age in which the main media outlets are not the single source of information (let alone the truth), Ping's attempt of telling fabricated story to an unwitting audience would not stand a chance.




    It is true that Ping has witnessed the Cultural Revolution in her young age. And it is also true that during the Culture Revolution, all the tragedies described in her book have happened in numerous places and numerous times in China. However it was based these truth, Ping starts to fabricate the lies. Her story simply does not add up: You cannot be severely politically persecuted and got admitted to college in 1977 at the same time. In the year of 1977, the college entrance exams were re-established after 10-years of abolishment. However, to get an admission, one's political background is far more important than his/her academic achievement. If Ping was indeed prosecuted because of her political background, there is no way for her to get into the college just because she scored high in the entrance exam (not to mention that she cannot possibly score high as she did not receive any education before).




    The `being-sent-to-US' story is even more absurd. First, in the early 80's, it is almost unimaginable to publish an article portraiting anything negative of the conservative regimen on any media. To say it was published on the highest-rank state-run newspaper is even less likely. The famous Chinese anti-fraud activist Fang Zhouzi has searched the People's daily achieve and found no such article. Second, the claim that she was punished by the regimen by exiling her to the United States is even more beyond comprehension. To the American reader who does not know much about the history, imagine the Kim Jong Il regimen punishing their dissidents by sending them to the US. That's a complete laugh. The fact that Ping went to the college right after the revolution and her capability of leaving China in early 1980 to the US, plus the picture showing she posing as a `Red Guard`(see Lin's review), made it sounds more like she and her family was not the subject of persecution, but rather someone who has benefited from the movement.




    Truth may be bent, yet one's credibility, once broken, can never be restored.

    17 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    I feel this is a fiction, rather than memoir. The author's memor

    I feel this is a fiction, rather than memoir. The author's memory is truly bent, even broken if she believes the story she tells. Like she, I grew up in China in the same time period, went to College after the culture revaluation, and came to the US for higher education. Based on my life experience, there is very little could be the true in her story. There are many scholars, bloggers who have life experience during the time period she's writing, published articles and reviews about this book. I challenge the author to produce some witness to her accounting of the horrible experience she endured. Fact or fiction, the readers deserve to know.

    13 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    The story turned out to be a shameless joke Go to Forbes to find

    The story turned out to be a shameless joke
    Go to Forbes to find out why. Ping Fu, a bold liar who has humiliated all her book reviewers and readers.

    12 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2013

    I have been reading all the reviews. And people have said enough

    I have been reading all the reviews. And people have said enough. Here is a summary: 1. Is this an inspirational book? yes,
    it is. I also agree. 2. Is this really a memoir based on true story? absolutely not.
    So you judge it. If you want something to inspire you, but don't care about it is real or not. go ahead. Otherwise, just dig a little bit history, you will see. Most people are innocent people, and you need ask if you need some spirit from something which didn't happen at all. As a matter of fact, the stories in this book are much worse than that. I do think if you have a high standard, you want integrity, and honesty in your highly spirited life!


    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2013

    Ping Fu's clarification is full of lies By Dr. Zhouzi Fang Pin

    Ping Fu's clarification is full of lies

    By Dr. Zhouzi Fang

    Ping Fu posted a clarification article on her blog today in response to my criticism. Her article can be found at

    [goo.gl/T7OOn]

    Ping Fu claimed that although my comments are correct, they are made based on the inaccurate Forbes report, not based on her new book. The Forbes report has since been corrected.

    In fact, if you read my article, you will know that the Forbes report triggered my criticism, but I made my comments not just based on this report, but also based on a series of reporting, radio and TV shows, and video interviews on American news media since 2005. I also read the two chapters of her book that are available on Google Book. All of them provide a consistent picture. If the Forbes report made mistakes, then the reports by other US media and what Fu said by herself on the interviews will also be wrong. It is useless to single out Forbes (as an scapegoat).

    In her clarification, Ping Fu said, "I did not say or write that I was in a labor camp; I stated that I lived for 10 years in a university dormitory on the NUAA campus. Chinese children don't get put in labor camps. I also did not say I was a factory worker. I said Mao wanted us to study and learn from farmers, soldiers and workers."

    Just ten days ago, in a video interview with Google, Ping Fu said that she lived in a ghetto for 10 years of Culture Revolution.

    See [goo.gl/8ghHV] at about 7:15, i.e., 7 min 15 sec.

    In a different interview with NPR, she said that she was sent to a correctional farm when she was 10 and stayed there for about 10 years. She vividly described a story of how she brought food from the correctional farm back to feed her sister.

    See [goo.gl/0GFGO] at 15:50.

    How could she blame the US reporters for mistaking what she actually meant?

    In her earlier interviews with US news media, she always claimed that she had been forced to work in a factory since nine years old, without education (schooling) for the entire Culture Revolution. Now her factory experience becomes "Mao wanted us to study and learn from farmers, soldiers and workers." That's what every Chinese student experienced in that era. Not forced labor, it is just a part of the normal school curriculum at the time. How come it becomes her personal tragedy? In her logic, should every Chinese student from Culture Revolution claim that they worked for 10 years in factory without being educated?

    But Ping Fu now also said that since the schools reopened in 1972, she studied tirelessly. In fact, schools reopened in 1968 during Culture Revolution. Let's just accept that Nanjing schools were special and they somehow reopened in 1972. But why would all previous US reports say that she was not schooled for 10 years? Here are a few examples:

    Inc. Magazine's report at [goo.gl/M5d3K]

    WeNews report at [goo.gl/GVoz9]

    NPR even said that she never set foot in a classroom for those 10 years. See [goo.gl/SkJko]

    Illinois Alumni said she was locked up for 10 years and released when she was 18. See [goo.gl/lzpTN]

    Why did all these US media make false reports? Why would they all believe she was different from other Chinese students of that time, not receiving any normal education while others did?

    Regarding the extraordinary story about her witness of a teacher being torn into pieces by four horses, Ping Fu clarified, "To this day, in my mind, I think I saw it. That is my emotional memory of it. After reading Fang's post, I think in this particular case that his analysis is more rational and accurate than my memory. Those first weeks after having been separated from both my birth parents and my adoptive parents were so traumatic, and I was only eight years old. There is a famous phrase in China for this killing; I had many nightmares about it"

    She acknowledged that she might have treated nightmare as reality. The famous Chinese phrase was killing by five horses, not by four. Killing by four horses was a western way of execution in ancient history. If she had a nightmare when she was a Chinese kid, she would have dreamed about five horses, not four. A possibility is that she fabricated this story to meet western mindset.

    Ping Fu acknowledged that her undergrad thesis on female infanticide was never published, nor was it reported by People's Daily (#1 newspaper in China). But she said she read an editorial on gender equality on People's Daily in 1982.

    However, she also claimed in earlier US interviews that her thesis made big public impact, with Wen Hui Bao and People's Daily reporting her findings, though her name was not referenced. Listen to what she said on NPR at [goo.gl/dmfE0] at 18:00

    If her thesis was never published, how would newspapers know her findings? All right, granted that those newspapers had secret channels to learn her findings. How come the People's Daily report was about gender equality? It was commonplace for Chinese newspapers to promote gender equality in those years. What makes her to connect that editorial with her thesis on female infanticide?

    Ping Fu claimed that she heard UN sanctioned China (due to her findings) while awaiting her passport. This is a significant but ridiculous event (UN sanction needs the blessing from China and other four permanent council members). She heard it from someone, and then made this claim (as a fact) everywhere in US media!?

    In response to questions about UN sanction, Ping Fu mentioned a Stanford student, Steven W. Mosher, who wrote about Chinese female infanticide in 1981 and published his book in 1984; "the same year I was waiting for my passport," Fu claimed. Then she continued with, "According to the Los Angeles Times, Mosher successfully lobbied George W. Bush to cut UN funding for China. His story and the timeline are consistent with my experience."

    Ping Fu arrived at US in January 1984. In order to draw connection with Mosher, she changed gear by stating that she was waiting for her passport in that year. As for Bush's cut of UN funding, that's Bush sanctioning UN (due to China's birth policy), not UN sanctioning China. Moreover, Bush became the president in 2001. That's 17 years after Fu moved to US. What will all these have anything to do with her story of being forced to leave China?

    Ping Fu claimed in her clarification that the government told her to leave, not giving a specific destination. (She said she waited her passport for a year.) She got a student visa, which was secured through a family friend at the University of New Mexico.

    However, in earlier interviews, she had repeatedly claimed that the government told her to leave China in two weeks. She even repeated this statement to the Forbes reporter the day before yesterday. Listen to what she said 10 days ago in the Google interview: Her thesis caught national and international attention, UN sanctioned China, she was jailed for three days, Deng Xiaoping (China's paramount leader after Mao) intervened, she was released and given a passport two weeks later, and told to leave China.

    She got her passport in two weeks after her three-day arrest! Yes, she said that, facing the camera, just 10 days ago. Now she changed her words, stating that it was very difficult to get the passport and she got hers more than one year after her release. Is she lying?

    Fu said in interviews that she knew only three English words when arriving at US although the specific words varied in different interviews. She now says, "English language classes were offered, but not required. I did not study English ever. I had `level zero' English, just like most Americans know a few words of Spanish or French. I tried to learn more English when I knew I was going to the U.S., but when I arrived, I only remembered a few."

    A few, not three anymore? But what she says now is still a lie. First, since 1978, English is a required course in college. Second,

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    If you want to know an anti-American dream, about how dishonesty

    If you want to know an anti-American dream, about how dishonesty can move you to the top, this is an excellent book to read. Otherwise, forget it. 

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    With just taking the stories of Ping Fu as stated in the book, t

    With just taking the stories of Ping Fu as stated in the book, this is a great book. A book describes well how a young lady accomplishes great successes in America - a great great country with freedom, democracy and opportunity . My problem is, the stories in the cultural revolution, are not true, the most, fictional. I agree with many readers, who lived through that period and suffered in that time, she really exaggerated too much. I would have no choice but question the honesty and integrity of the author. And why she does that.

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 1, 2013

    This book is full of straight lies, I never heard of anybody is

    This book is full of straight lies, I never heard of anybody is lied more than this author before. She definitely set some kind of record. For all she stating  how she suffered in China and got wrongly treated etc are obviously lies aimed to obtain sympathy from the normal Americans. I actually think that all those reviewers and editors who gave 5 stars are trying to start a propaganda war against China; otherwise very simple, just do some simple search and ask some people who knows about China whether her story is believable, then you will know her stories are lies and lies. I myself lived in the same time as she, and my family got punished more than her family by the communism party; but as discriminated and humiliated as our family at the time, we never experience, saw or heard any stories like she wrote. She is a fabulous liar with a bullet proof skin, I can't understand how people can fall sleep with such kind of big lies. I know a lot of ordinary American like to hear China is so evil,  but are you guys ever thought of that all you guys got brain-washed by the media whole your life? Being a Chinese American who spend 1st half of my life in China and 2nd half of my life in US, I can see both the good part and bad part of both countries and their people. And for one thing I can tell you, don't just believe other nation/people is evil because you heard it from the media or somebody; mostly the ordinary people in other country is just like you, a ordinary American who cannot change anything politically and need to work and earn the paychecks every day.
    I wish there is a TV interview featuring the Author and some other Chinese American who questioned her together on the stage; it probably only take 5 minutes then all the viewers will know whether she is a liar. I think the ordinary American people are smart enough to distinguish a lie from truth if they are presented with equal information from both sides.
    I always thought and still believes that one of the biggest character of normal American people is their honesty and integrity; but It's a real pity that now so many honest people are fooled by this shameless liar and wasted their hard earned money on this book. Should God hear, he will punish her.

    Man, in before I thought Lance Armstrong is the biggest liar, now I know he isn't for sure, he definitely looks like saint to me compared to this Lady Ping Fu. Time will tell, everybody will know the truth if not brain-washed and dried.

    On internet, there are a lot of thoughtful and complete analysis/reviews on the lies from this book. One convenient place is Amazon's Customer review board, it has a lot of good posts with facts and analysis from a lot of people; the most thorough one is from reviewer Lin; I suggest you read his(or hers) post before you buy the book.

    God bless America with less cheaters and liars.   

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    This is an amazing story of perseverance in unbelievable circums

    This is an amazing story of perseverance in unbelievable circumstances.  This book is an excellent read, hard to put down, and will
    at times make you cry!  Ping's journey from Communist China to successful CEO is an inspiration to us all....


    10 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Well, the American aren't stupid, but they do tend to loose that

    Well, the American aren't stupid, but they do tend to loose that intelligence when it comes to China. Brain washed is what I call it.

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2013

    Fu fabricated her experience in Shanghai and put a file photo fr

    Fu fabricated her experience in Shanghai and put a file photo from architecture archives of a Spanish style villa in her book as her Shanghai parents' residence.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

    To potential buyers who are not familiar with the period of the

    To potential buyers who are not familiar with the period of the Cultural Revolution, this book may sound like a very inspirational rags-to-riches story, but to any Chinese person who had gone through that period, including myself and my family members, this book is more like a novel than an autobiography. Since its release, the book has stirred up a massive online debate over the veracity of Ping Fu's alleged life experiences. Many of the author's claims have been debunked and even the author herself has admitted there are inconsistencies and errors that need to be corrected in subsequent printings. I suggest anyone interested in this book check online for more information about the controversy over this book.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 18, 2013

    One of the authors has admitted to many memory lapses in her int

    One of the authors has admitted to many memory lapses in her interview with the Guardians.  Moreover, the publisher has compromised to make corrections in the future.
    It could have been a much better book.  But I would only consider it after publisher makes all the corrections.  
    Look forward to the 2nd edition.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2013

    I found the story of Ping Fu's early years in China to be intere

    I found the story of Ping Fu's early years in China to be interesting and heart wrenching if true. Being forced at 8 years old to leave her parents and raise her younger sister and the treatment she faced growing up in China was difficult to read about. I wondered if neighbors really did not help the children more. The fact that she remained optimistic after all that she went through speaks well of her. Her immigration to the USA and subsequent education and founding of a software company was interesting to read about, but got bogged down a bit in the details. She is very proud of her accomplishments but I would have enjoyed the book more if it was written in chronological order instead of bouncing back and forth and it if remained focused on her life instead of her work. Some of the information did seem bit far fetched. I received this book as an Early Reader in exchange for my review.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Intense and captivating

    This memoir touched me deeply, in ways that made it difficult to contain my emotions. It is inspiring in so many ways, and her resilience to harsh conditions reminded me of Victor Frankl's "Mans's search for meaning". Yet she is more present since her work and company is culturally and politically relevant, as the digital space increasingly expands to facilitate and generate physical objects and define our environment and our evolution with technology. Highly recommended.

    4 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Ping Fu has written a powerful book about her life in China and

    Ping Fu has written a powerful book about her life in China and in the United States.  Her childhood in China was idyllic until the Cultural Revolution hit when she was 8.  She learns a hard truth and is taken from her family, forced into the role of parent to a younger sister. Fu intersperses the remembrances of China with her life in the United States, which started when she was 25.  Ultimately, she becomes a successive business owner, the founder of Geomagic.  The story of her life is interesting - I learned a good bit about China that I did not know - but it is more inspirational, the story of someone who overcomes tremendous odds to become a successful caring person of integrity. 

    4 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2013

    Fake memior. It is Ping Fu who takes advantage of the compassio

    Fake memior.

    It is Ping Fu who takes advantage of the compassionate American people who cannot stand to see her claimed suffering. Over decades, she has found how her suffering actually won her compassion from people and how her vulnerability turned out to be her advantage. She especially emphasizes how being as a female victim has helped her to achieve her successful status.

    You cannot help but notice that does not matter where she goes she keeps telling people she came to America with no money and no language skills, being locked up in a house on the first day of arrival. In her Bend, not Break, she described how she was wrenched away from her Shanghai parents at eight years old and was forced into playing the role of a surrogate mother to her four-year-old sister. Later she evokes her emotional memory to tell many unfounded stories in her books and speeches. After her lies got debunked, to get away from the lies, she just simple declares “those first weeks after having been separated from both my birth parents and my adoptive parents were so traumatic, and I was only eight years old.”

    Chinese people around the globe who experienced the Cultural Revolution have great deal of life stories to tell. But here is not the right forum to address it, not because of the denial, nor of suffering amnesia. Chinese people could remember their 5,000-year history. As we have nothing to lose, we simply refuse to take lies as granted, or way of self-promotion to gain power, fame, and money.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 26, 2013

    It is a surprise to see my schoolmate published a memoir about h

    It is a surprise to see my schoolmate published a memoir about her life in two worlds. So far during my twenty-plus years in the U.S., this might be the first memoir I found written by one of my former schoolmates from Suzhou University.  The description of her life in her first world in this book was so fictional that I, as a science major, could not help but admire her talent as a literature major who seems to be able to spin her bizarre tales almost effortlessly, but inventing her personal experience as a source of inspiration for others is not ethically acceptable in my opinion. I fully understand why my other schoolmates all show great contempt for her story. As an electrical engineer, I think this book has a very low signal to noise ratio and needs to be cleaned and filtered thoroughly. Do you want to spend your money on worthless noise rather than useful signal?

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2013

    This is one of my favorite books and is very inspiring. As a Chi

    This is one of my favorite books and is very inspiring. As a Chinese, my dad suffered a lot too in Cultural Revolution and the story in this book were not very far from our old life. I like the author's life attitude( bend, but not broken), which makes her become a successful high tech leader. I can not understand some angry attackers why just focus on questions such as she could speak three or five english words. The typo errors or mistranslations can happen for every books. Why they can not see her big success and learn from the positive life attitude (bend, not broken)?

    3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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