Beneath the Night Tree

( 29 )

Overview

Do I have a child? Julia DeSmit knew she would face the question eventually, but she didn’t expect it now. At twenty-four, she is finally content with the way her life has unfolded. A single mother to her son and young brother, she works at the local grocery store while chipping away at a two-year degree. All her free time is spent with her unorthodox family—her boys, her grandmother, and her boyfriend of five years. It’s not perfect, but Julia is happier than ever.
So when she...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $5.46   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 4
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.46
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(198)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2011 Paperback All new product! Some copies may have slight wear and/or a publisher's remainder mark. Christian family owned business for over 20 years!

Ships from: Milford Center, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$5.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(68)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 1414323239 New Unread Book. (Thank you for shopping from us. Order inquiries handled promptly. )

Ships from: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 4
Close
Sort by
Beneath the Night Tree

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$12.99 List Price

Overview

Do I have a child? Julia DeSmit knew she would face the question eventually, but she didn’t expect it now. At twenty-four, she is finally content with the way her life has unfolded. A single mother to her son and young brother, she works at the local grocery store while chipping away at a two-year degree. All her free time is spent with her unorthodox family—her boys, her grandmother, and her boyfriend of five years. It’s not perfect, but Julia is happier than ever.
So when she receives the cryptic e-mail from her son’s father, Julia’s world is turned upside down. She hasn’t heard from Parker since he left her in a college parking lot nearly six years ago. But one look at her son—the spitting image of his father—is enough to convince her that, for better or worse, Parker is a part of their story. Faced with this new reality and an unexpected tragedy, Julia begins a tightrope walk between what was and what is, what she hopes for and what will be. Tyndale House Publishers
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
After Julia DeSmit's boyfriend, Parker, left her in a college parking lot six years ago, she made a new life with her son, younger brother, grandmother, and new boyfriend. She works hard at a grocery store to bring in a meager income and takes classes toward her associate's degree. Overall, Julia is happy. But when she receives an email from Parker, her son's father, wanting to know if he has a child, her world is turned upside down. VERDICT Baart is a promising new voice in the CF genre. Her debut novel, After the Leaves Fall (2007), received glowing reviews. This beautifully written, heartwarming story will appeal to fans of Karen Kingsbury and Lori Copeland.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781414323237
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/24/2011
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Read an Excerpt

beneath the Night Tree


By nicole baart

Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2011 Nicole Baart
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4143-2323-7


Chapter One

songbird

Daniel hummed in his sleep. It was an unconscious song, a midnight lullaby, as familiar to me as the sigh of my own breath. I fell asleep at night listening to the cadence of his dreams, and when I woke in the morning, his quiet melody was a prelude to birdsong.

I opened my eyes in the darkness and strained to see an imprint of peach on the horizon beyond my open window. It was coming, but when I blinked at the black reflection in the glass, dawn was nothing more than a promise, and Daniel's every exhalation seemed tuned to charm it into being. I pictured him in his bed, arm flung over the pillow and palm opened toward the sky as if God had set an orchestra before his still-chubby fingers. As if God had chosen my son to coax light into our little house.

Maybe He had.

If there was one thing I had learned in five years of being a single mom, it was that the Lord did exactly that: He used the small, the inconsequential, the forgotten to shame the wise. He worked in contradictions, in the unexpected. And I wouldn't have been the least bit surprised if He hovered over my Daniel, drawing music from the curve of his parted lips with the gentle pull of divine fingers.

The thought made me smile, and for a moment I longed to tiptoe across the cool floorboards and be a part of it all, to slip into the tiny attic nook that was my son's bedroom. I wanted to feel my way through the shadows, stretch out beside him, and kiss the sugar-sweet little-boy mouth that puckered like a perfect bow.

But I didn't. Instead, I did what I did every day. I got up, grabbed the clothes that I had laid out the night before, and headed downstairs. If Daniel was singing, then I danced: avoiding the stair that creaked, twisting around the smooth-worn banister like a ballerina, waltzing to Simon's room, where I peeked through the crack of the mostly closed door.

My ten-year-old half brother was on his stomach, bare back exposed to the unseasonable cool of an August morning. We had all the windows flung open, and the house whispered with a light breeze. It wasn't cold, not really, but the sight of his skin made me stifle a shiver. I floated into Simon's room, a part of his dreams, and laid a blanket across his shoulders like a blessing. Schoolboy shoulders, I noticed. Thin and angular, but broadening, hinting at the strong man he would soon become as if the clean line of his skin were bursting with promise. A tight bud about to unfurl. Sometimes I still couldn't believe that she had left him here to blossom.

I touched the mop of his dark hair with my fingertips and thanked God that the child below me slept in peace. That he loved me.

When I spun into the kitchen and switched on the coffeemaker, I couldn't stop the prayer that rose, a balloon lifting beneath the cage that held my heart. Thank You, I breathed in the silence. For Daniel, for Simon, for my grandmother, who still slipped from bed not long after I turned on the shower to whisk pancake batter or fold blueberries into muffins for breakfast. Thank You for the four corners of our family and the way that we folded into each other like one of my grandma's quilts. Edges coming together, softening.

Most of all, I was grateful for the stillness of the predawn hush, for the short reprieve when everything was dark and new, emerging. It was in these moments as the day was still lifting its head that I could believe everything was exactly as it should be instead of the way it was.

Not that life was horrible—far from it. But as the weeks and months circled on, I couldn't deny that our ramshackle family was often more off than on. The whole thing reminded me of Daniel's birthday present: a carved model train track. Though the sleek, red engine could pull a chain of cars around the twining loops for hours on end, there inevitably came a moment when a single wheel tripped off the track. Who knew what caused the quiet stumble? It was a magician's trick, a sleight of hand—everything bustling along one minute and struggling the next. But the train kept going; the engine pulled on. It just dragged the coal cars behind it, clacking unevenly all the way.

I felt just like that engine, hauling everything in my wake. Hauling everyone in my wake.

When I pulled back the shower curtain, it became obvious that the DeSmit family train was already well on its way to derailment. There were worms in the bathtub, a dozen or more squirming in a mound of dirt so rich and black it made me think of cake. Devil's food.

I had specifically told Daniel not to put worms in the bathtub and had even given him an ice cream bucket in which to store his newest collection. My son needed to have his hearing checked again, I decided. But it was an exercise in futility. I knew that what plagued Daniel wasn't a hearing problem; it was a listening problem.

As I deposited handfuls of squirming earthworms into the bucket I rescued from the front porch, I felt the momentary bliss of my morning slackening its fragile hold. Hot on the heels of the stark reminder that Daniel was an angel only when he slept came a familiar twinge of worry for Simon, the boy who earned his wings in a thousand different ways. By the time I finally stepped into the mud-streaked shower and turned it on full blast, I could feel concern overflow my fists like worry stones too heavy to hold.

Handsome as Simon was, and growing more mature by the day, he still wore loss like a chain around his neck, heavy and awkward, dragging his head down. He loved us, I knew that, but he missed her. And why shouldn't he? Janice was a terrible mother to me, and yet I missed her every single day. I felt her absence in the shadowed corners of my heart, where longing echoed. It was a sound track of hurt—soft, but always there.

And Janice had been a good mom to Simon. Or at least, as good as she could bring herself to be. No wonder he bore her ghost like an anchor.

"Do you like it here?" I asked him once, in the beginning, when Janice's departure could still be considered nothing more than an extended trip. I had wanted to ask him, Do you like us? but I couldn't bring myself to say those exact words.

All the same, Simon's eyes sprang to mine, wide and startled. The question was innocent, but the look on his five-year-old face told me that the answer wasn't quite so benign.

"It's okay," I said then, reaching to ruffle his hair. "You don't have to—"

"I do," he interrupted me, and his voice cracked with the emotion behind the words. "I like it here."

It took years for me to realize that the problem wasn't Simon's affection for this newfound family and home; it was his own fears about our affection for him. No matter how hard we tried to make him believe that he was a part of us, I knew he continued to battle the personal pain of wondering, deep down, if he was an outsider.

And the problem was only exacerbated at Mason Elementary. Although I was quite sure that Simon was off-the-charts brilliant, the sort of student every teacher longed to shape and mold, he dreaded the start of a new school year. I knew it, even though he had never ventured to so much as whisper a word against his classmates.

As far as I could tell, the kids were decent to him. Mason was a rural community, and the area boasted a substantial population of Latin American immigrants, many of them already second or third generation. The local schools were, at least in theory, diverse and welcoming. Simon seemed to fit right in. Sometimes, when people mistook him for Mexican, he didn't even bother to correct them or point out his North African roots.

But there were other things that set him apart. Like the fact that he was parentless—I knew the pain of that particular stigma all too well. Or that he lived with his half sister, whom most of Mason considered a child herself and only fourteen years his senior. An unwed mother on top of it all. And no one could forget that the woman Simon called Grandma shared no blood ties with him, or that the boy he named brother was in fact his half nephew. In a community where families were formed along staunchly traditional lines—cue the theme song from Leave It to Beaver—our home was a mismatched patchwork that was more than just an aberration from the norm. It was a source of almost-morbid fascination.

I groaned and turned to face the stream pouring from our antiquated shower faucet. The water coursed over my forehead, pooled in my open mouth. It'll be fine, I told myself for the thousandth time. We'll be just fine.

"Mom! I have to go pee!" Daniel's fists on the bathroom door sent shock waves through the quiet worry that shaped my morning.

Spitting out a mouthful of lukewarm water, I called, "Almost done! I'll be out in a minute."

"A minute? That's, like, forever. I can't wait that long!"

"Give me a break," I muttered, turning off the faucet and throwing back the shower curtain. The brass hooks screeched against the metal rod in perfect harmony with my mood.

Before hopping in the shower, I had laid my towel on the back of the toilet, and when I reached for it now, I realized that the old porcelain was beaded with sweat from the steamy room. I had forgotten to turn on the bathroom fan, and even the rose pink wallpaper of the tiny room was covered in rainbow-colored droplets. I stifled a sigh, forcing myself not to think about mold and mildew and rot. We were already battling enough of that in the cellar beneath the mudroom.

"My towel's wet," I told Daniel through the door. "Could you grab me a clean one from the linen closet?"

"No time!"

Whipping the damp towel around me, I unlocked the bathroom door and threw it open. "A little patience would be nice," I chided Daniel. But even though I was annoyed, I couldn't resist reaching a hand to smooth the sleep-creased skin of his cheek.

"Get out of the way!" he screeched, yanking me by the wrist. When he could wedge himself between the doorframe and my dripping form, Daniel threw his shoulder into my side and deposited me in the hallway that opened onto the kitchen. The door slammed at my back.

"Good morning." Grandma smiled from the counter.

"Good is a relative term," I told her.

"The sun is shining."

I turned to look out the window over the sink. "So it is."

"You have a beautiful son."

Though I cocked an eyebrow at her, I felt my lips rise in assent.

"But you are leaving a puddle on the floor."

When I looked down to assess the damage, rivulets of water from my drenched hair deepened the gathering pool at my feet. "Sorry. I got kicked out of the bathroom."

"I heard." Grandma opened a drawer and extracted a flour-sack towel. "Here. It's thin, but it'll help."

I crossed the room and took the towel from her outstretched hand. Wrapping it turban-style around my hair, I gave her a wry grin. "I'd go upstairs and get dressed, but I left my clothes in the bathroom with Daniel."

"They're going to be wet." Grandma's smile was apologetic. "When I got up, I could tell that you forgot to turn the fan on."

"I was distracted," I muttered, trying to defend myself. "Daniel put worms in the bathtub again."

"Remind me why the bathtub is prime earthworm real estate?"

"Who knows? Daniel's mind is a mystery."

Grandma laughed. "Right you are. Why don't you head upstairs and find some dry clothes? By the time you come down, I'll have coffee on the table."

"Sounds great." I did a quick scan of the kitchen counter and realized that she hadn't started breakfast yet. "But I'm in charge of grub this morning. You, sit. Put your feet up. I'll make French toast."

"French toast?" Simon enthused, stifling a yawn. He had materialized in the archway that led to our small living room, and I was stunned by how he seemed to fill the space.

"Yup," I told him, swallowing the feeling that I was looking at a young man instead of a boy. "Good morning, by the way."

He removed his glasses, rubbed his still-sleepy eyes, and replaced the plastic frames on his nose with a yawn. Finally taking the time to focus on me, he gasped. "Get some clothes on, Jules!"

"It's not like I'm naked."

"You're wearing a towel!"

Grandma and I exchanged amused looks as he hurried back to his room.

"I think you may have scarred him for life," she laughed when we heard his door slam.

"Only if I'm lucky." I was trying to be funny, but suddenly Grandma's eyes glazed over. It was a quick change, a transformation that I was starting to get used to. She misted over easily these days. "Hey," I whispered, tightening my towel with one hand and squeezing her arm with the other. "I was only teasing."

"I know." Grandma sniffed and patted my fingers where they rested on the terry-cloth arm of her robe. She was staring at the place where Simon had stood as if she could see the faint glow of the aura he left behind. "But I worry about him."

"Me too."

"You don't think we're ...?"

"Scarring him?"

"Yes," she breathed, the word so faint it was barely voiced.

"No," I assured her. "No, we're not."

"But our house is so small."

"You mean cozy."

"We're practically on top of each other, Julia."

"It draws us together."

"Simon is surrounded by women."

I laughed. "There're only two of us. And two of them, I'll remind you. The boys are hardly outnumbered."

"A little privacy would be nice...."

"Tell me about it," I groaned, drawing her attention to my towel toga with a gentle hip-to-hip bop.

Grandma shook her head and covered her eyes with one hand, but I could tell that the mood had passed. "We're not exactly your typical family unit."

"It's okay," I said, bestowing a kiss on the lined knuckles that hid her expression. "We're doing the best we can."

"Is it enough?"

It was the question I asked myself every single day. But I didn't tell her that. Instead I parroted the words I had heard her say a hundred times. A thousand. "It has to be."

I made my way upstairs, leaving Daniel to his morning routine, Simon to his preteen disgust, and Grandma to her thoughts. It felt selfish, almost indulgent, that I stole away when everyone was, for one reason or another, preoccupied with their own concerns. As I gathered a new outfit from the drawers of my old-fashioned bureau, I wished for a moment that I could crawl back between the sheets of my double bed. I'd yank the duvet over my head and pretend that Daniel was obedient, Simon well-adjusted, and Grandma a decade younger. Maybe more. I could use another adult in this house with energy to match my own.

Twenty-four, I thought, yanking on a pair of khaki cargo shorts. I'm almost a quarter of a century old. Sometimes I felt double my age.

And maybe I was. My life seemed divided in two. There was the mundane, the everyday, the work. The frustration and wondering and worry. The times when I felt like no matter what I did, it was the wrong thing to do. And then there were the moments that transcended it all. The laughter, the warmth, the awed understanding that in spite of everything, we were so blessed.

Sometimes I woke up and believed, really believed, that God sang over us.

Had I felt that way only an hour ago?

"What do you want from me?" I asked the reflection in the mirror on my wall. The woman in question just stared back. I wasn't even sure who I was talking to. Myself? The three people who depended on me downstairs? God? I might be failing all of them, but heaven help me, I was trying. It had to be enough.

Straightening my Asian print T-shirt, I gave the hazel-eyed girl in the mirror a nod of encouragement. "You're doing just fine," I told her.

I almost believed myself.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from beneath the Night Tree by nicole baart Copyright © 2011 by Nicole Baart. Excerpted by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 3, 2012

    Good Conclusion

    After reading the first two in this series, I was excited to see how everything concluded. I love the reality of what the main character was dealing with. It is a likely conflict that anyone in that same situation could face or even a person in a long distance relationship. The way it ended could be seen the further into the story you get. Even though some of it became a little predictable, it was still so good I read it twice.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 31, 2011

    great read

    This book was really good. You have an idea where is headed, but it gets to that point in a bit different way than expected. Kept my interest during the story. Grab tissues toward the end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 27, 2011

    predictable but good

    I found this book to start off slow, but I haven't read the previous ones in the series (which I didn't know there was until the end of this book when they were mentioned!) It was an okay read. This book is far more character driven, following a 24 year old girl, Julia, with her son and her step-brother / pretty much son. It is also very predictable. But I still enjoyed reading it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 18, 2011

    Epic - A must read

    Beneath the Night Tree, by Nicole Baart, is a great book. I love how Julia's story unfolds. This is a must read book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 10, 2011

    Everyone Needs a Grandma Nellie!

    This third book in a manifest of writings by Nicole Baart deals again with the idea of being able to start over in life. The beginning of the novel I found quite dry reading, and had to really force myself to keep track of the main characters and piece the theme together as I progressed. Grandma Nellie, as one would surmise, is someone we would all do well to have in our lives: full of sage, patience, dry humor, yet also quirky in her mannerisms. After persistent toward the middle of the book, the main character, Julia DeSmit does seem to have the usual dilemma of choosing between her carefree and organized love of life or accept the past/present realities of life's offerings and come down to a verity of day to day present pain and truth. The reader watches the characters grow and face a milieu of faith building aspects that lead to and enter into a surprise yet comfortable conclusion for the ending. The reader is also engaged and delighted with the meaning and subtleties of the title of the book. This was a book I reviewed for Tyndale House Publishers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Predictable but enjoyable

    When I picked up this book, I didn't know it was the 3rd in a series that I had not read until after I finished it. It could stand alone, but perhaps explains why it seemed difficult to know and understand the main character at first. I enjoyed the storyline very much but found it to be highly predictable. After the first few chapters, I could guess exactly what was going to happen, and turns out I was right! Still, it was delightful to read and I really liked the author's writing style. I want to read other books by this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent!

    At age 24 Julia loves taking pictures capturing the world through the lens of her camera. She and her brother Simon 10, and her son Daniel 5 live with Grandma Nellie on the DeSmit farm. Her boyfriend Michael speaks of future plans and asking her to leave all she knows behind but Julia realizes that Simon and Daniel have a stake in this too. After all what would her life be like without the 3 of them? When she was on her computer going through her email she came across a message which causes her to remember the past she has tried so hard to forget. What will happen with the email and how will it impact the relationships she now has? Not having read the first two in the series I have to say that I was able to become attached to the characters right away and feel that the novel stands alone. An excellent novel that I throughly enjoyed and I would recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 6, 2011

    Catching up with Julia!

    I had read the first two books in this "series" quite some time ago, not realizing that there was another soon to come - so I was really pleased to find out what was going on with Julia DeSmit. We pick up a few years after the last book left off and some new family dynamics have formed, with Julia looking ahead to the larger future. The overall theme? I felt it was redemption, something I personally can't read enough about. Without giving too much away, she makes some tough decisions, this book made me think, and I was simultaneously really glad I read it and sorry when it was over. It left me wanting more and I highly recommend all three books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 5, 2011

    One of my newest favorite authors

    Beneath the Night Tree by Nicole Baart. This is her third book in her series about Julia Desmit and her life from when she became a single mother and the trials that followed. The first book was After the Leaves Fall, the second was Summer Snow. Each of her books are extremely well written and very hard to put down. I found myself mesmerised by the storyline and what all she goes thru with her unorthodox family. All the books are stories about a young girl's struggle with loss, love, identity and faith with characters that are hard to forget and a story that you won't forget either. These are books that I would reread again-they are that good!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 1, 2011

    Beneath the Stars

    Everything seems to be coming together in Julia's life. She enjoys her job, likes her college courses, is in love with a wonderful man, and is learning how to be a good mom to her son and her younger brother. When she receives an email from her son's father, her entire world is tilted upside-down. One thing after the other continues to upset the perfect life Julia has always dreamed of and thought she finally had in her reach.

    Beneath the Night Tree by Nicole Baart was surprisingly refreshing as far as Christian fiction goes. Much more than just a simple romance, readers will feel the depth of emotion of Julia and her "dysfunctional" but well-loved family. Themes of trust and hope were prevalent throughout. I especially loved the relationship between Julia and her grandmother. I enjoyed the style of writing as well, and Nicole Baart has earned a spot on my list of new favorite authors.

    This is the third book in a series about Julia. However, it also stands alone. I highly recommend this novel and will be reading others by Nicole Baart in the (hopefully near) future.

    I received a free copy of this book from Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for my fair and honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 30, 2011

    I give this book five stars!

    Julia not only readily admits to being a part of a patchwork family but finds comfort in it. Julia, her grandmother, son and younger brother all live on a farm in Mason, Iowa. But she can feel her world slowly starting to crumble. Her ten-year-old brother is quickly becoming a teenager, still grieving his mother walking out on him over five years ago. Her grandmother isn't getting younger and the fact that she will one day be gone scares Julia. She loves her five-year-old son but wonders if she's doing enough? She and her boyfriend have been dating for five years but she wants more. With him living six hours away, time together is limited. When he finally proposes, Julia wants to be excited but finds herself feeling as if something's missing. Complicating things further is the entrance of her son's father. She hasn't seen him since she told him she was pregnant. What could he want? Why is he coming into her life now?

    I give this book five stars! I've not read any other books by Baart but I'm definitely adding her to my "to read" list. She writes in such a way that I'm able to instantly identify with Julia and experience her highs and lows with her. The story moved at such a pace to keep me interested, wondering what would happen next. I really liked Parker, Daniel's father. He was introduced in such a way that I wasn't sure if he'd be a "bad guy" or not but his role soon became apparent. I enjoyed Baart's sense of humor and I now want to make my own night tree :-).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 5, 2011

    Good Book

    I admit this was a hard one for me to initially get interested in. I put off getting started reading it, I just was not feeling it. Even after starting it the first few chapters were a slow read for me. About halfway through I realized I was finally becoming drawn into the story and understanding the main character Julia a bit better. by the last pages I was hooked and wanted to know what her fate would be. Over all I would give this book 3 out of 5 stars, even though I was not easily captivated in the end I was very drawn to the book.
    I liked how it ended I will admit I wanted to Julia to do what she did in the end I guess that does not make much sense, but I can not tell you what she did our it would spoil the ending!!

    Disclaimer: I did recieve a free copy of this book from Tyndale Media for review purposes. The company did not influence my review in any way the opinions in this post are my opinions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 3, 2011

    Want to read more

    Julia DeSmit, a young single mother, has a great relationship and great family, even if it is a bit unconventional. That all begins to change when she receives and e-mail from someone she knew she'd have to face sooner or later, her son's father. With the re-entry of this man into her life, she sees things from a perspective she's never considered before. Is she living the life she's dreamed of or is there something more out there for her, something she's never let herself consider before?
    This book was a joy to read; I found myself deeply immersed in the story and felt as if I stood right next to Julia for most of the story. Nicole Baart writes very descriptively and tells a captivating story, even if it is a bit predictable at times. As I read the story, I was rooting for Julia to make the right choice and to see what more life had to offer her. According to advertisements near the back of the book, this was the third in a series of Julia books. I'm looking forward to reading the others.
    Disclaimer: Tyndale House Publishers provided this book free of charge for review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Delightful easy read

    A very interesting book easy to read as a stand alone or as part of the series. The author appears to look right into the mind of a single mother living with her grandmother ~ all the conflicting responsibilities and yet the joys as well. I liked the way the author portrayed the conflict within Julia as she starts to allow her ex-boyfriend into his son's life but at the same time developing a relationship with her fiance. Loved the wedding dress shopping trip but was sad by the result. I was very impressed with Julia's interaction and understanding of how hurt her 10 year old brother was by the fact that his mother was not returning. It would be very difficult to be the sister and the mother at the same time. The author has a gift for description and I found myself seeing the farm and the house as Julia saw it. The night tree was delightful and a great idea. I was impressed with the author's take on the single life of a young Christian woman in today's world who is supported and buoyed up by the older faith of a strong grandmother. Thank you to Tyndall for providing a review copy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Beautiful Story

    The first word that comes to mind when I think of this book is beautiful. The author's writing is almost poetic. She uses words in a unique way.


    She also tells the story of a broken family - in more ways than one. She shows you all the little pieces and how sharp and painful the edges are - how they rub up against the characters and cut them just when all seemed to be peaceful and "safe" again. For a while they've been in the business of ignoring those broken pieces. Like a bunch of broken glass, whenever someone is cut, then all those pieces get swept under the rug with the hope they won't slip out and cut anyone again.


    None of them truly believe that's the best way to deal with it, they just don't want the pain of trying to gather all of them up and face the probability of getting cut by more than one piece at a time. They are all just holding it together and fear that if anything changes - it won't work anymore. Change comes for them whether they like it or not.


    This book had romance in it but it was more a powerful story about life and how the choices we make shape us and our families. It was about forgiveness, grace, choosing to live without fear and not settling for what is expected and safe because we think we aren't worth anything more. It's also about faith but in a subtle way and without being the least bit preachy.

    I enjoyed it very much and need to thank Tyndale for providing my copy in return for my unbiased review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderful Story

    Julia Desmit is a 24 year old single mom, who with the help of her grandmother manages to take care of her five year old son Daniel, and her ten year old half brother Simon. Living in the old farmhouse on her grandmothers farm is often crowded but Julia knows its family that matters. In a long distance relationship with her boyfriend Michael, she hopes to one day be his wife.

    When she receives an email from Parker Holt, asking her the one question she dreads answering, does he have a child? She decides to answer him truthfully, when he decides he wants to meet his son, she has one condition, they wont tell Daniel who he is, instead saying he is Julia's old friend. There is an instant connection between the boys and Parker, and soon Julia finds herself relying on him as well!


    When Michael finally proposes, she realizes changes will have to be made. Can she leave her grandmother. Will Simon want to move with her, how does she disassemble her family, and she isn't sure she even wants to. One things for sure, Parker is slowly becoming a huge part of Daniel and Simon's life, how will he fit in the picture once she is married?

    All I can say is WOW! I loved this story. The author paints a vivid picture of the struggles a single mother faces. Luckily Julia had her wonderful Christian grandmother Nellie, for support. Daniel was written as a cute but boisterous child who was all boy, while Simon, although loved, and wanted by his family, never really felt like he belonged. He held out hope that his mom would come back on day, and actually Julia wanted her mother as well. Even though Julia didn't disclose to the boys that Parker was Daniels father, both boys bonded to him immediately, but with Michael, someone who had been in their lives for five years there wasn't a connection. As the boys start spending more time with Parker, it becomes obvious to Julia that Michael is releived that he wont have to be a father figure to the boys. It was easy to imagine the dilemma Julia faced if she married Michael. When she finally realized that God had shown her the path she needed to take, the choices just fell into place for her, allowing her family unit to become stronger.

    I found this book to be the perfect contemporary christian fiction read. The characters could easily be your neighbors, with the problems being so realistic, and the blended lifestyles typical of todays families.I liked that Julia wasn't perfect, she juggled mother hood, her job at a grocery store, and night school with the help of her grandmother, they worked as a team.

    This book drew me in from the first pages becoming a story I couldn't put down. I am anxious to read more from this new to me author.

    Book provided by publisher in exchange for an honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    Great Read!

    "Beneath The Night Tree", A Book Review.
    "Beneath The Night Tree" by Nicole Baart is a story of love with characters that will warm your heart. The first pages were difficult to get through, there were just too many details but if you stick with it you will get involved with the people from Mason, Iowa and won't want to put the book down.
    Julia is a single mother in love with whom she believes is the perfect man until her son's father suddenly is back in her life. This family goes through a journey that leaves you thanking God for what He is doing behind the scenes.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this Advanced Reader Copy free from Tyndale House Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Beneath The Night Tree

    I was rather skeptical when I received this ARC book from Tyndale House Network in my mailbox. I thought it's going to be another of one of those dreadful chic-lit that could put me to sleep the instant I skim through the pages. But i was wrong, very wrong, as Beneath The Night Tree is a very moving and beautiful story.

    I was immediately drawn into the lives of the characters in the story, and I find myself being pulled into their world where I laugh along with them and cry along with them.

    This book taught me one lesson: We may have our lives planned, but there's always surprises and unexpected things that comes along the way. It may be good and it may be bad, and we all must learn to live our lives one day at a time.

    You see, the main protagonist, Julia thought that she had it figured out and her life is well planned after her unexpected pregnancy. She had new life and new boyfriend now, and she looks forward to marry him. But oh, how wrong she was. The father of her child reappear in her life once again and seeks redemption. Julia knew that she couldn't deny him the rights as a father.

    Beneath the Night Tree was written in such a wonderful way that I felt really close to the characters, and I actually cried when Julia's grandmother died. It made me think of my own late grandmother.

    Overall, Beneath The Night Tree is a very lovely read, and I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a good inspirational family oriented story.

    Thumbs up for Beneath The Night Tree and I rate this book 4 out of 5. I would definitely prefer it more if there's a sequel to this book and I thought improvement ought to be made to the cover to make it look more lively and irresistible.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is a heartwarming inspirational family drama

    Six years ago Patrick "Parker" Holt left his girlfriend Julia DeSmit in a parking lot at their college. Stunned by his desertion, Julia raises their son Daniel without him while also serving as mom to her ten years old half-brother Simon who was abandoned by his biological mother. Julia and the two young boys live with their grandma.

    Julia works at a grocer while also taking night classes to obtain an associate degree. She has a caring boyfriend Michael Vermeer who is nice to her and her family and wants her and the boys to move with him to Iowa City. Parker sends her an email wanting back in her life and wondering if he sired a child with her. She knows she needs to let him meet his son, but has doubts about giving him a second chance.

    This is a heartwarming inspirational family drama with a strong cast as each of the unorthodox DeSmit household and the two men in Julia's life have different personalities and fears. Rejection and redemption are the common threads that run though the well written story line, but Julia holds the plot together as she must choose between the two adult males who want her or neither of them, but it is observing her two "sons" with each that helps her select. This is a terrific character study that defines family as a team of loved ones.

    Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome story!

    Beneath the Night Tree is the first book I have read by Nicole Baart, and it won't be the last. I was immediately drawn into the story of a rather unconventional family. Living together with Julia on the family farm is her aging grandmother, Julia's 5 year old son, and Julia's younger brother who was abandoned by their mother several years earlier. Julia thought she had her future all planned out, and she looked forward to getting married to her boyfriend of many years. But their world was rocked to the core when the biological father of her son appears on the scene. She reluctantly agrees to let him spend time with the boys. I laughed and I also cried while reading this wonderful story of God's divine intervention in Julia's life. When she thought she knew what was best for herself and her family, God gently steered her in the right direction. Her grandmother's faith and prayers were an inspiration, and this made me miss my own grandmother terribly. This is a fantastic story, and I really hope there is a sequel. I would love to find out what happens next in the lives of Julia and her little family. I received a complimentary copy of this ARC from Tyndale House Publishers in exchange for my honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)