Benefit [Bonus Tracks]

( 6 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
Benefit was the album on which the Jethro Tull sound solidified around folk music, abandoning blues entirely. Beginning with the opening number, "With You There to Help Me," Anderson adopts his now-familiar, slightly mournful folksinger/sage persona, with a rather sardonic outlook on life and the world; his acoustic guitar carries the melody, joined by Martin Barre's electric instrument for the crescendos. This would be the model for much of the material on Aqualung and especially Thick as a Brick, although the acoustic/electric pairing would be executed more effectively on those albums. Here the acoustic and electric instruments are merged somewhat better than they were on ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
Benefit was the album on which the Jethro Tull sound solidified around folk music, abandoning blues entirely. Beginning with the opening number, "With You There to Help Me," Anderson adopts his now-familiar, slightly mournful folksinger/sage persona, with a rather sardonic outlook on life and the world; his acoustic guitar carries the melody, joined by Martin Barre's electric instrument for the crescendos. This would be the model for much of the material on Aqualung and especially Thick as a Brick, although the acoustic/electric pairing would be executed more effectively on those albums. Here the acoustic and electric instruments are merged somewhat better than they were on Stand Up (on which it sometimes seemed like Barre's solos were being played in a wholly different venue), and as needed, the electric guitars carry the melodies better than on previous albums. Most of the songs on Benefit display pleasant, delectably folk-like melodies attached to downbeat, slightly gloomy, but dazzlingly complex lyrics, with Barre's guitar adding enough wattage to keep the hard rock listeners very interested. "To Cry You a Song," "Son," and "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey and Me" all defined Tull's future sound: Barre's amp cranked up to ten (especially on "Son"), coming in above Anderson's acoustic strumming, a few unexpected changes in tempo, and Anderson spouting lyrics filled with dense, seemingly profound imagery and statements. As on Stand Up, the group was still officially a quartet, with future member John Evan (whose John Evan Band had become the nucleus of Jethro Tull two years before) appearing as a guest on keyboards; his classical training proved essential to the expanding of the group's sound on the three albums to come. Benefit was reissued in a remastered edition with bonus tracks at the end of 2001, which greatly improved the clarity of the playing and the richness of the sound; the four additional tracks are "Singing All Day," "Witch's Promise," the elegant, gossamer-textured "Just Trying to Be," and the smooth hard rocker "Teacher" -- which had the first truly memorable guitar/flute riff in rock music (or Tull's output). Written and recorded prior to Benefit, they're all lighter in mood than the material from the original album, adding some greater variety but fitting in perfectly on a stylistic level. [The reissue includes four bonus tracks: "Singing All Day," "Witch's Promise," "Just Trying to Be," and the "Original UK Mix" of "Teacher."]
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/8/2002
  • Label: Parlophone (Wea)
  • UPC: 724353545727
  • Catalog Number: 354572
  • Sales rank: 653

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Jethro Tull Primary Artist
Robin Black Organ, Piano
John Evan Organ, Piano
Technical Credits
Ian Anderson Composer, Producer, Liner Notes
Robin Black Engineer
Ruan O'Lochlainn Cover Design
Kevin Reilly Graphic Presentation
Terry Ellis Executive Producer, Cover Design
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A great album that needed better cover art

    Amazingly enough, this album was initially hurt by its truly horrid cover art (it has the look of a budget bin throw away) but the great songs on it overcame that obstacle. A classic album worthy of being added to any good rock collection (maybe you can draw your own cover for it).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Great CD

    This CD has seven great songs on it. Some of them are "Teacher," "With you there to help me," "To cry you a song," "A time for everything," and "Witches Promise." I never knew two songs could be that good until I heard "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey and me," and "Inside." The rest of the songs are all right.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A fine breakthrough

    I consider "Benefit" to be Jethro Tull's breakthrough album. Although I don't really care much for most of the music on here, it really is considered a breakthrough for Jethro Tull because this album goes closer to the band's signature sound rather than the bluesy sounds from their first two attempts, and Ian Anderson has officially grown into his voice (he no longer has that gay sounding voice he had in the 60's). My reccomendations for good music on this album would be "To Cry You a Song", "With You There to Help Me", "Teacher" and "Inside".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Remastered Vintage Tull Worth a Revisit

    Most people who have not yet reached ''a certain age'' are familiar with the music of Jethro Tull only as far as FM radio will take them. Generally, that means they know nothing beyond the singles from Aqualung. Ian Anderson and the lads were making music--great music--years before Aqualung. Benefit, their third record originally released in 1970, is as good as it gets. This album has a richness to it that is hard to describe, but then again, Tull's music has always defied description, somehow brushing against various genre, but never falling squarely into any one. In a time when Led Zeppelin was trying to squeeze a whole lotta love from a lemon, Tull was weaving an elaborate tapestry full of Anderson's quirky, colorful characters. Rather than hormone-laden angst, Tull seems to suspend people and events in mid air, as he dances and plays around them, giving the listener a full 360 degree view.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews