Best 368 Colleges (Princeton Review 2009 Edition)

Best 368 Colleges (Princeton Review 2009 Edition)

4.5 6
by Princeton Review, Tom Meltzer, Christopher Maier
     
 

College students (120,000 of them) reveal what life is really like at the nation's top schools. This must-have guide gives you college rankings like no other and covers all the essentials -- from academics to social life to financial aid, and everything in between. We also provide you with all the basics: admissions criteria, deadlines, phone numbers,…  See more details below

Overview

College students (120,000 of them) reveal what life is really like at the nation's top schools. This must-have guide gives you college rankings like no other and covers all the essentials -- from academics to social life to financial aid, and everything in between. We also provide you with all the basics: admissions criteria, deadlines, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and more.

The unique ranking lists in The Best 368 Colleges report the top 20 schools in 62 categories. Based on how students at the schools -- the real experts! -- rated their colleges, the ranking list titles include:

·Professors Get High Marks
·Best Career/Job Placement Services
·Best Classroom Experience
·Party Schools
·Dorms Like Palaces
·Best Campus Food
·Most Politically Active Students
·Diverse Student Population
·Class Discussions Encouraged
·Best College Newspaper
…and many more!

The Best 368 Colleges also includes lists of great schools for 15 of the most popular undergraduate majors.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375428722
Publisher:
Random House Information Group
Publication date:
07/29/2008
Series:
College Admissions Guides Series
Edition description:
2009
Pages:
832
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 10.20(h) x 2.10(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Best 368 Colleges (Princeton Review 2009 Edition) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nothing in the college search and selection process will ever take the place of visiting a campus, taking a tour, talking with students and admissions staff, siting in on a class, staying overnight in a dorm, walking the surrouding neighborhood (if there is one), or browsing in the campus bookstore. But this book provides very quick and easy reference to the basic facts that will help you narrow down your college search. How big is the undergraduate population? What's the male/female ratio? What percentage of applicants is admitted? Where do most of the students score on the SAT/ACT, and where were most of the students in their high-school classes? What are the particular strengths of the college? What are the costs? How serious are the students about studying? About partying? How much drinking goes on? The Princeton Review gives you the basic information about all of these topics. Of course not every school is covered (just 368), but most of the large state universities and smaller private schools you would be likely to consider as an out-of-state student are included. Most people can easily visit branches of the state university system or nearby community colleges and get a good idea of what it's like to go there. This book seems primarily useful to help you narrow down the choices for schools across the country, or 500 miles up (or down) the coast, to help you decide whether it's worth making the effort to look further into them. The organization couldn't be simpler or more logical. Two pages per school. Interested in Northwestern? The schools are listed alphabetically, so just thumb through the book until you get to the "N's" and there it is. (This takes a little bit longer for the state universities, many of which are listed as "University of ....") Considering the amount you're likely to spend on a college education (plus the fact that it will be four years of your life), this book is an incredible investment. If it saves you the cost of gas for one trip to one school you realize you really wouldn't like it will pay for itself, and if it points you to a school that will eventually change your life then it will be invaluable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago