The Best American Noir of the Century

The Best American Noir of the Century

4.2 5
by James Ellroy
     
 

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A treasure trove of a hundred years’ worth of the finest noir writing selected by James EllroySee more details below

Overview

A treasure trove of a hundred years’ worth of the finest noir writing selected by James Ellroy

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Surprisingly, 20 of the 39 well-chosen stories published between 1923 and 2007 in this impressive crime anthology date to the last two decades, which may sound counterintuitive to casual readers who associate noir with the 1940s and 1950s. All the contributors excel at showing the omnipresence of the dark side of humanity in many different times and locales. In addition to names synonymous with noir such as Cornell Woolrich and Jim Thompson, Ellroy (Blood's a Rover) and Penzler (The Best American Mystery Stories) offer depressing fare from writers better known for other work, like David Morrell, whose first published story, "The Dripping," about the disappearance of a man's wife and daughter, is one of the book's best. Lesser-known authors also distinguish themselves, like Christopher Coake, whose reverse chronology in "All Through the House" serves to heighten the suspense rather than dissipate it. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
“Surprisingly, 20 of the 39 well-chosen stories published between 1923 and 2007 in this impressive crime anthology date to the last two decades, which may sound counterintuitive to casual readers who associate noir with the 1940s and 1950s. All the contributors excel at showing the omnipresence of the dark side of humanity in many different times and locales. In addition to names synonymous with noir such as Cornell Woolrich and Jim Thompson, Ellroy (Blood’s a Rover) and Penzler (The Best American Mystery Stories) offer depressing fare from writers better known for other work, like David Morrell, whose first published story, “The Dripping,” about the disappearance of a man’s wife and daughter, is one of the book’s best. Lesser-known authors also distinguish themselves, like Christopher Coake, whose reverse chronology in ‘All Through the House” serves to heighten the suspense rather than dissipate it. (Oct.)”
—-Publishers Weekly, STARRED

"This generous, flavorful collection of noir-tinged tales comes cherry-picked by Ellroy and Penzler, who exclude Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler as authors of "private detective stories." Most of the 39 tales here appeared originally in magazines, not only in pulps like Manhunt and Black Mask but also in the more literary American Mercury, Southern Review, and Omni. Each story is introduced with a brief author biography. These pay respect to the careers of these professional scribblers, who managed (with the aid of multiple pseudonyms) to keep body and soul together writing and writing still more. The collection opens with Tod Robbins's "Spurs" (1923), a beauty-and-the-beast tale that questions which is which; it was the basis for Tod Browning's chilling movie Freaks. The collection closes with Lorenzo Carcaterra's "Missing the Morning Bus" (2007), in which, amid half-emptied bowls of peanuts and salsa, Death takes a seat at a weekly card game. In between come memorable but lesser-known tales by, among others, Dorothy B. Hughes, Jim Thompson, Cornell Woolrich, Patricia Highsmith, and Bradford Morrow. Verdict Rooting around in the rich soil amassed by almost a century of noir, Ellroy and Penzler unearth dark, pungent, and flavorful truffles that will satisfy fans and may well whet the appetites of new readers." —Library Journal

Kirkus Reviews

A star-studded memorial, thick as cement overshoes, to an oddly shaped century.

It's instructive to compare Ellroy and Penzler's behemoth to Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins's A Century of Noir(2002). Though it includes more stories (39 to 32), even fewer are by women (three to five). Only one story is duplicated—Gil Brewer's bleak anecdote "The Gesture"—and there are only seven additional authors: Spillane, James M. Cain, Dorothy B. Hughes, David Goodis, Evan Hunter, Ed Gorman and Lawrence Block. The oddest feature of the present collection, though, is the serious overrepresentation of recent decades. There are two stories from the 1920s, one—Steve Fisher's workmanlike, forgettable "You'll Always Remember Me"—from the '30s, three from the '40s, six from the '50s, two from the '60s, two from the '70s, three from the '80s—and then ten from the '90s and ten more from 2000-2007. Are we living through a golden age of noir? No, but a golden age of Penzler anthologies, since no fewer than 16 of the stories here, nearly all the volume's second half, were first published or reprinted in earlier collections he edited or published. Special treats include Tod Robbins's "Spurs" (the basis of the film Freaks), Cornell Woolrich's final story, "For the Rest of Her Life," F.X. Toole's ringside saga "Midnight Emissions," and Scott Wolven's savage "Controlled Burn," as well as the equally dark tales by Jim Thompson, Patricia Highsmith, Thomas H. Cook and perennial Penzler favorite Joyce Carol Oates.

Most of the others are worth your time as well—unless, or maybe even if, you've already caught them in previous Penzlers.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547577449
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/04/2011
Series:
Best American Series
Pages:
752
Sales rank:
406,088
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.34(h) x 1.78(d)

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