Best Book of Bugs

Best Book of Bugs

by Claire Llewellyn
     
 

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Here's a worm's-eye view of a multitude of marching legs, scary-looking pincers, and fast-flying wings. Each colorful double-page spread provides a close-up look at the activities of a host of creepy characters in a wide variety of habitats, while informative captions detail everything from the feeding habits of leaf-cutter ants to the body features of beetles,

Overview

Here's a worm's-eye view of a multitude of marching legs, scary-looking pincers, and fast-flying wings. Each colorful double-page spread provides a close-up look at the activities of a host of creepy characters in a wide variety of habitats, while informative captions detail everything from the feeding habits of leaf-cutter ants to the body features of beetles, scorpions, butterflies, and more. Kids will delight in the vivid, realistic illustrations and lively narratives that provide insight into the daily routines and adventures of an amazing variety of critters - from the trapdoor spider ambushing its prey from an underground burrow, to a step-by-step story depicting a year in the life of a honeybee. Offering both picture book appeal and educational value, this book will make an enthusiastically received gift.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The Best Book of Bugs is full of informative text and illustrations which bring kids right into the world of various arthropods, from the darting dragonfly to the spinning spider.” —Children's Literature

“Exquisite brightly colored and realistically detailed illustrations along with a fairly brief but informative text bring us closer to the lives of bugs, spiders, bees, ants, beetles, butterflies, moths and dragonflies, all this in a very appealing, large format, nonfiction picture book. ” —Children's Literature

“If readers could crawl through the grass on six legs or float overhead on gossamer wings, the views this radiantly illustrated book provides might well reflect their world...The full-color cut-aways of ant colonies and bee hives, as well as the verdant overviews of the rainforest and deciduous forest floors, remove the "creepiness" of these crawly creatures and make them resemble living jewels. ” —Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
Being 90 percent of the earth's animals, bugs could rule the earth, if they had a mind to. Around for more than 450 million years, they've adapted in all sorts of ways to eat and keep from being eaten, and considerably downsized from the prehistoric swamp dragonfly big as a man's forearm. The Best Book of Bugs is full of informative text and illustrations which bring kids right into the world of various arthropods, from the darting dragonfly to the spinning spider.
Children's Literature - Gisela Jernigan
Exquisite brightly colored and realistically detailed illustrations along with a fairly brief but informative text bring us closer to the lives of bugs, spiders, bees, ants, beetles, butterflies, moths and dragonflies, all this in a very appealing, large format, nonfiction picture book. Part of "The Best Book Of "series, this volume includes a glossary and index and could be enjoyed by a wide age range.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5--Two lavishly illustrated introductions. Bugs highlights the major ways in which insects and spiders differ and then briefly describes some outstanding physical or behavioral characteristics of about two dozen arthropods. The life cycles of honeybees, dragonflies, and butterflies are also outlined. The second book briefly discusses the general characteristics of several groups of dinosaurs and mentions some special traits of about two dozen species. Brightly colored acrylic paintings of varying sizes appear on every page of both titles. Although the books are clearly written, the information is oversimplified and some important facts are omitted. For instance, in Bugs, the book notes, "Wasps live in colonies, too"; however, not all species are social insects, some are solitary wasps. In Dinosaurs, several chapters include fictionalized scenes. Descriptions of attacks by meat-eaters on plant-eaters are sensationalized. More thorough introductions to these subjects are widely available, such as Robert Snedden's What Is an Insect? (Sierra Club, 1993) and Jennifer Dewey's Spiders Near and Far (Dutton, 1993; o.p.); both include excellent illustrations. Miriam Schlien's Discovering Dinosaur Babies (S & S, 1991) and Steve Parker's Did Dinosaurs Lay Eggs? (Benchmark, 1997) offer lucid explanations of how recent discoveries have effected our understanding of what dinosaurs looked liked and how they behaved.--Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
If readers could crawl through the grass on six legs or float overhead on gossamer wings, the views this radiantly illustrated book provides might well reflect their world. This introduction to insects covers the basic bugs children discover: beetles, butterflies, ants, bees, and dragonflies, as well as spiders and a few other non-arthropods, e.g., snails and worms. Some elementary facts are provided on each creature; played out in step-by-step pictures is a caterpillar's metamorphosis into a butterfly, as is a fierce dragonfly nymph's capture of a tadpole. The facts are common to most bug books, but the pictures are so eye-catching they fairly steal the show. Occasional captions point out individual features, such as the difference between the abdomens of a butterfly and a moth, or the various webs spun by spiders. The full-color cut-aways of ant colonies and bee hives, as well as the verdant overviews of the rainforest and deciduous forest floors, remove the "creepiness" of these crawly creatures and make them resemble living jewels. (diagrams, glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753451182
Publisher:
Kingfisher
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Series:
Best Book of Series
Pages:
33
Product dimensions:
9.64(w) x 10.53(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Claire Llewellyn is a prize-winning author of nonfiction for young readers. In 1991 she was shortlisted for the prestigious TES Junior Information Book Award for MacDonald's Take One: Rubbish, and in 1992 she won that award for My First Book of Time. Since then she has written more than 20 children's books on a wide range of subjects. She is the author of Kingfisher's recent Saints and Angels. Claire lives in Hertford.

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