Best Democracy Money Can Buy: An Investigative Reporter Exposes the Truth about Globalization, Corporate Cons, and High Finance Fraudsters / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$21.81
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (92) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $1.99   
  • Used (85) from $1.99   

Overview

Greg Palast digs deep to unearth the ugly facts that few reporters working anywhere in the world today have the courage or ability to cover. From East Timor to Waco, Karachi to Santiago, he has exposed some of the most egregious cases of political corruption, corporate fraud, and financial manipulation, globally. His uncanny investigative skills as well as his acerbic wit and no-holds-barred style have made him an anathema among magnates on four continents and a living legend among his colleagues and his devoted readership, worldwide. This exciting new collection brings together some of Palast's most powerful and influential writing of the past decade. His columns in the Observer have a cult following and he made headline news when he went undercover for the Observer to break open the 'Lobbygate' scandal of corruption inside the Blair Cabinet. Included here are his reports on that story, which earned him the distinction of being the first journalist ever to be personally attacked on the floor of Parliament by a prime minister; his celebrated Washington Post exposé on Jeb Bush and Katherine Harris's stealing of the presidential election in Florida, which made him "a legend and a hero on the Internet" (Alan Colmes / Fox Radio) when it ran in Salon.com; and recent stories on George W. Bush's pay-offs to corporate cronies, and the business-created 'energy crisis.' Also included in this volume are new and previously unpublished material, television transcripts, photographs, and letters.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'The journalist I admire most. [Palast's] amazing work puts all the rest of us journalists to shame. I'm an avid reader of everything Palast writes - can never get enough of it.' —George Monbiot, The Guardian

'The information is a hand grenade.' —John Pilger

'Fucking brilliant brilliant.' —Mark Thomas

'The raw material is so good and the stories told with such brio.' —Larry Elliot, The Guardian Award-winning investigative journalist

C-Span
The last of the great journalists.
Jude Wanniski
Great writing on the Evil Empire of the IMF.
Wall Street Journal
George Monbiot
The journalist I admire most. [Palast's] amazing work puts all the rest of us journalists to shame. I'm an avid reader of everything Palast writes - can never get enough of it.
The Guardian
Alan Colmes
To Americans who cannot read his stories printed in Britain's Observer, he is America's journalist hero of the Internet.
Industrial Society
[Palast's reports] created shockwaves which have yet to die ... outstanding journalism.
Andrew Tobias
Your reports should be read all over America.
Private Eye Magazine
The Most Evil Man in the World.
Will Hutton
All power to Palast's pen!
Harper's & Queen
Tony Blair's nightmare.
Laura Flanders
George Bush's nightmare.
Counterspin
Jim Hightower
The type of investigative reporter you don't see anymore - a cross between Sam Spade and Sherlock Holmes.
Harry Evans
Fabulous stories.
Sunday Times
John Pilger
The information is a hand grenade.
New Statesman
Maude Barlow
Courageous writing - when no one else will do it.
MediaChannel.org
An American hero in journalism.
Cleveland Free Times
The world's greatest investigative reporter.
US Journalism Hall of Fame
Intrepid investigative reporter who first broke the news that tens of thousands of likely Democratic voters were disenfranchised in Florida before the 2000 election.
Publishers Weekly
Muckraking has a long, storied tradition, and Palast is evidently proud to be part of it. In this polemical indictment of globalization and political corruption, Palast (a reporter with the BBC and London's Observer) updates the muckraking tradition with some 21st-century targets: the IMF, World Bank and WTO, plus oil treaties, energy concerns and corporate evildoers of all creeds. Some of Palast's reports are downright shocking (if familiar). He shows, for example, how the WTO prevents cheap AIDS drugs from reaching victims in Africa and how World Bank loan policies have crippled the economies of Tanzania and other developing countries. On the home front, he details Exxon's horrific safety record before the Valdez disaster and reveals the price-gouging by Texas power companies during the California energy crisis. In Britain, Palast exposes the "cash for access" policies of the Blair administration, and blasts the legal system for shielding Pfizer Pharmaceuticals from lawsuits by victims who had defective Pfizer valves installed in their hearts. These are all good, important stories. Most of them, however, have been published before. This book is essentially a collection of Palast's newspaper articles, hastily stitched together with some commentary and exposition. As such, it lacks cohesiveness and the depth his subjects deserve. In addition, Palast's bombastic style and one-sided perspective do much to undermine his own credibility. How seriously should readers take a journalist who labels former U.S. Treasury Secretary Larry Summers an "alien" and dismisses Wal-Mart shareholders as "Wal-Martians"? There is much of value here, but readers who want a full-bodied, serious analysis of how globalization is affecting developing countries or how corporate giants pay for political favors should look elsewhere. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Eight updated articles by award-winning iconoclastic reporter Palast represent some of the better known stories he has investigated such as the purge of African-Americans from Florida's voter registry, the iron triangle of globalization, and big money in dirty places. He also reflects on being an American exile in London. Distributed in the US by Stylus. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780745318462
  • Publisher: Pluto Press
  • Publication date: 2/20/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.28 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Greg Palast is an investigative journalist whose articles have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, The Nation, Salon.com, and numerous other US, British, and international newspapers, magazines, and online publications. He writes the "Inside Corporate America" column for The Observer and is joining BBC-TV's premier news broadcast, Newsnight, as special investigations reporter. He is the winner of the prestigious Financial Times David Thomas Prize, in 1997 and the Industrial Society Investigative Story of the Year, in 1998. He has also been nominated by the UK Press Association as Business Writer of the Year in 1999. In 2000, Salon.com selected his report on the US elections as politics story of the year. He has been the subject of several documentaries, an NPR profile, and an upcoming "60 Minutes" feature.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Forewords by Joe Conason and Will Hutton

Who Gives a Shit? An Introduction

1. Jim Crow In Cyberspace - The Unreported Story Of How They Fixed The Vote In Florida

2. Sell The Lexus, Burn The Olive Tree: Globalization And Its Discontents

3. Small Towns, Small Minds

4. Pat Robertson, General Pinochet, Pepsi-Cola and The Anti-Christ:

Special Investigative Reports

5. Inside Corporate America

6 The Best Democracy Money can Buy

7. Cash-For-Access - "Lobbygate" - The Real Story Of Blair And The Sale Of Britain

8

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2003

    A BULLS-EYE FOR THE LEFTIES!

    Greg Palast is doing important work, and it's more than a little embarrassing that it's the BBC -- not NBC or ABC -- writing his paycheck. His devastating account of the 2000 election, and particularly the part played by the private company ChoicePoint in providing flawed data for voters rolls, should be read by everyone planning to vote in 2004. Palast is a thinking man's Michael Moore. I must heartily also recommend Keshner's COCKPIT CONFESSIONS OF AN AIRLINE PILOT, which is ballyhoo'd by various reviewers, and rightly so... this bigoted, brilliant, scatheing 'DocuNovel' is far more than I ever expected.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2003

    If You Value Truth Above All Else

    A must read for everyone who loves this country and is willing to fight for it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2003

    Truthseekers read here!

    If you've ordered this book and read it, then you've taken the first step to freeing your mind from all the garbage the media suffocates us with. And if you swallow these eye-opening books like I do then I earnestly recommed anything by Noam Chomsky, as well as these two books, which will no doubt enlighten you about the Bush administration and the war in Iraq: (1) War Plan Iraq: Ten Reasons Against War with Iraq (Milan Rai); and (2) STUPID WHITE MEN (Michale Moore). And if you love a good laugh, here's a satire on Bush and the media: The little samba boy (Jay Singh). The truth is out there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2003

    Find out how we as citizens are getting done over

    This investigative reporter is a rare breed who writes in a lively and concise style and seems to know how to dig up the dirt on governments and corporations alike. This book makes current affairs so interesting and empowering to citizens everywhere, especially as a number of the events that he describes are ongoing. The updated edition promises to be an even better read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2002

    Do Not Read This If You Think Ignorace Is Bliss!

    What can I say? This book was and is the beginning of my political awakening. I originally heard of Greg driving to work early Saturday morning and I found myself agreeing with his critisicms of the American media. I went out and bought his book almost immediately and was appalled by what I learned. Through this book I educated myself about the WTO, IMF and World bank collusion for profit. I educated myself on the blatant disregard of many African-American's constitutional right to vote. I was impressed that his investigative reports found the dirt on Republicans and Democrats both. Warning: Do not read this book unless you are ready to face the facts about the corruption and widespead greed that controls the world around you! ; )

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2002

    OUR WORST FEARS ARE DOCUMENTED

    Palast packs his powerfully written pages with the kind of information we ought to be reading in the US daily press--but we're not. The chapter on the Exxon Valdez is breathtaking. The account of the Florida vote fraud in 2000--well, let's just say that election was set up a couple of years before, starting with 7000 names of ex-felons from Texas. Yes, Texas! Palast gives us the goods on the left as well as the right, showing greed and corruption are equal opportunity failings. The Fourth Estate is supposed to protect us from this. Palast shows how the job needs to be done if this country, and the world, are to be pulled back from the brink.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)