Best English Short Stories V

Best English Short Stories V

by Giles Gordon
     
 

Representing the finest short fiction in the English language, this acclaimed anthology features contributions from Fay Weldon, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Martin Amis, John Banville, Barry Unsworth, Edna O'Brien, and Nobel Prize-winner Nadine Gordimer.See more details below

Overview

Representing the finest short fiction in the English language, this acclaimed anthology features contributions from Fay Weldon, William Trevor, Alice Munro, Martin Amis, John Banville, Barry Unsworth, Edna O'Brien, and Nobel Prize-winner Nadine Gordimer.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It's somewhat of a stretch to call this fine collection of stories ``English,'' since it includes work by certified Canadians, South Africans and Irish. English- language stories is what they are, though the editors admit in their pithy introduction that outlets for good stories are getting scarcer in the U.K. It's noteworthy, in fact, that four of the most effective of them made their initial appearance in the New Yorker more than a year ago and were therefore available first to an American readership: Martin Amis's edgily hilarious ``Career Move,'' in which a poet and a screenwriter inhabit each other's worlds; Edna O'Brien's ``Wilderness,'' a lacerating account of a mother's loss of her son in a freak accident; William Trevor's ``Lost Ground,'' a magical story of faith, illusion and death in an Irish backwater; and Alice Munro's ``A Real Life,'' one of her penetrating, wise and absurdist sketches of the oddities of life in rural Ontario. ``West Wirral Story'' by Michael Carson is a delightful and poignant portrait of an impossible mother-daughter relationship, originally written, like other stories here, for BBC radio. Jane Gardan's ``Bevis,'' by another author new to the U.S., is a skillful cynical-romantic reminiscence with a brilliant surprise ending. Nadine Gordimer's ``The Look-Alikes'' is a telling, brief morality tale of university life in South Africa, and Carlo Gebler's ``The Headscarf'' is an equally brief anecdote about life in Northern Ireland that speaks volumes. There is not much verbal experimentation in this anthology, but the selections, which share a keen sense of contemporary life, span a generous range of styles and linger in the mind's eye. (Dec.)
Library Journal
Despite the title, this diverse selection of 25 recently published works is not exclusively British in origin or subject. Four outstanding stories--Edna O'Brien's ``Wilderness,'' Bernard MacLaverty's ``The Wake House,'' William Trevor's ``Lost Ground,'' and Alice Munro's ``A Real Life,''--are Irish or Canadian. Each of these four gems is a haunting vignette of sadness. Because the stories in this collection include such a wide cross-section of styles and are the works of notable contemporary authors like Martin Amis, Fay Weldon, and Nadine Gordimer, this book is recommended for most general collections. However, the best accolade is that it is enjoyable.-- Patricia C. Heaney, Nassau Community Coll. Lib., Garden City, N.Y.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393035803
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
11/25/1993
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.00(d)

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