Best Music Writing 2010

Overview


Best Music Writing has become one of the most eagerly awaited annuals out there. Celebrating the year in music writing by gathering a rich array of essays, missives, and musings on every style of music from rock to hip-hop to R&B to jazz to pop to blues and more, it is essential reading for anyone who loves great music and accomplished writing. Scribes of every imaginable sort—novelists, poets, journalists, musicians—are gathered to create a multi-voiced snapshot of the year in music writing that, like the ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (48) from $1.99   
  • New (21) from $1.99   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Best Music Writing 2010

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$17.99 List Price

Overview


Best Music Writing has become one of the most eagerly awaited annuals out there. Celebrating the year in music writing by gathering a rich array of essays, missives, and musings on every style of music from rock to hip-hop to R&B to jazz to pop to blues and more, it is essential reading for anyone who loves great music and accomplished writing. Scribes of every imaginable sort—novelists, poets, journalists, musicians—are gathered to create a multi-voiced snapshot of the year in music writing that, like the music it illuminates, is every bit as thrilling as it is riveting.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

In the 11th installment, guest editor Powers and series editor Carr offer what could be one of the most prescient compilations of all, exemplified by a transcription of writer Christopher Weingarten's speech at the 140 Characters Conference in New York City. In it, Weingarten states that he and other music writers will soon be out of jobs because the internet has let anyone become a music writer. Weingarten argues that the fallout will be the increasing difficulty to experience new music outside of one's comfort zone, an incredible value to music writers. This is the axis around which the book revolves. Readers are exposed to a wide variety of compelling essays and articles they likely missed, from a profile of the 28-year-old conductor of the Gothenburg Symphony, Gustavo Dudamel, to an examination of the pivotal role mobile phones have had in exposing new Latino artists, to an essay on screwy record company accounting practices. There are still the lengthy profiles of artists like Merle Haggard and The Gossip's Beth Ditto, but the compilation's breadth is its real appeal. While it functions as a snapshot of the events, trends, and personalities that made up 2010, it also works as a portrait of an industry and an art form in transition.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher

Village Voice’s music blog, October 2010
“Da Capo's annual Best Music Writing series is as close as rock scribes get to the Oscars.”

Vol 1 Brooklyn
, 10/14/10
“Best Music Writing…Ever…quite impressive."

USAToday’s “Pop Candy” blog, 11/4/10
“My annual favorite.”

Mogo Music Network, 11/15/10
“A holy grail for music nerds and writers alike, Da Capo’s Best Music Writing anthologies aren’t just required rock-critic reading—they’re a pedestal to which we all aspire.”
 

New YorkJournal of Books, 12/1/10
“These essays make the reader want to explore the music of these artists if they have not been fans before. That is what good music writing should do—it should pull the reader into the music.”
 
New YorkAmsterdam News, 11/24/10
“This year’s entry into the ‘Best Music Writing’ series touches on some of the biggest and most compelling stories of the past year…what Best Music Writing 2010 proves is that music journalism, as an industry, may be on its last legs, but music criticism itself isn’t dead.”
 
Library Journal, 12/3/10
“Most [essays] transcend the trends of the moment and will be appreciated by listeners with a range of tastes looking for new musical avenues to explore.”
 
OxfordAmerican, 12/1/10
“Every year, without fail, Da Capo’s Best Music Writing anthology impresses… The collection remains a must-read for open-minded music fans… This volume makes for great reading.”
 
AustinChronicle, 12/8/10
“Editor Ann Powers' thoughtful eye on contemporary rock writers avoids…fancy stepping, and many of the chapters are notably good.”
 
PopMatters.com, 12/6/10
Best Music Writing...continues to rebuke those academics and writerly peers who still question the legitimacy of pop music writing…What Best Music Writing 2010 does best is showcase the vast diversity of opinions, forms, styles and subjects at work in the music world.”
 

Slug, December 2010
“Beyond a collection of great articles about musicians, Best Music Writing has fantastic thoughts about how music reflects America’s changing cultural norms and vice versa.”
 
LA Weekly
One of the Top Ten Rock Books of 2010 (#6)
 

PasadenaWeekly, 12/23/10
“As the blogosphere continues to tilt the proper music press in unknown directions, this annual collection of profiles, op-eds, interviews and good old-fashioned think pieces from myriad magazines, newspapers and Web sites reminds that there’s still a place, and need, for knowledgeable and professional music writing—not just thumbnail-sized reviews, but significant essays exploring politics, society, race, self-identification and -expression through artists and songs.”

FlavorWire.com
“This is one of the series’s best volumes. LA Times critic Powers’s wide taste and generous outlook means a collection that feels like a map while mostly reading like stories.”

Booklist, 12/9/10
“Wide ranging and incisive, this collection merits consideration.” 

The Stranger, 12/23/10
“Of all the best-of collections published at the end of every year, Da Capo Press’s Best Music Writing series is, well, one of the best.”
 
PhiladelphiaTribune, 12/24/10
Da Capo’s ‘Best Music Writing 2010 has become one of the most eagerly awaited annuals out there with scribes of every imaginable sort—novelists, poets, journalists, musicians—are gathered to create a multi-voiced snapshot of the year in music writing that, like the music it illuminates, is every bit as thrilling as it is riveting…The accomplished writing found within these pages cover a wealth of mediums and presentations…[and] allows readers a chance to discover journalists who delve deep into the corners of music culture—from rock to hip-hop to pop and country—and place not only their knowledge of music, but also their undying love for it, front and center.”

Publishers Weekly, web-exclusive, starred review, 4/11/11
“In the 11th installment, guest editor Powers and series editor Carr offer what could be one of the most prescient compilations of all…The compilation's breadth is its real appeal. While it functions as a snapshot of the events, trends, and personalities that made up 2010, it also works as a portrait of an industry and an art form in transition.”

USAToday’s Pop Candy blog, 12/2/11
“It's by far the best ‘best of 2011’ book of the year.”

Blogcritics.org, 12/2/11
“A fine collection of this year's finest essays from music critics…Da Capo's Best Music Writing 2011 is proof positive that good music journalism isn't dead.”

Library Journal
Mirroring the heterogeneous music landscape, this 11th annual collection, guest edited by Los Angeles Times chief pop critic Powers, ranges from rock, pop, indie, and hip-hop to classical and jazz. Powers collects pieces from print journalism (e.g., Rolling Stone, The New Yorker) and a wide array of quality online music writing (e.g., Pitchfork, Slate), creating a microcosm of the music world's varied styles, voices, and personalities. "You're music writing, too," writes Powers in her introduction, stressing the relationship between music and the listener. Jason King's appreciation of Michael Jackson, Jason Fine's in-depth profile of Merle Haggard, and Nitsuh Abebe's review of the decade in indie rock are some of the highlights; others write on well-known artists Adam Lambert and Lady Gaga as well as more esoteric subjects like Beth Ditto and a State Department-sponsored outreach tour by Ozomatli.Verdict While a few of the essays deal with the ephemera of music news of the past year, most transcend the trends of the moment and will be appreciated by listeners with a range of tastes looking for new musical avenues to explore.—Jim Collins, Morristown-Morris Twp. Lib., NJ
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780306819254
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 11/9/2010
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 1,342,414
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


Ann Powers is the chief pop critic for the Los Angeles Times and lives in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Daphne Carr is the author of Pretty Hate Machine and lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)