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The Best Pet Ever
     

The Best Pet Ever

by Victoria Roberts, Deborah Allwright (Illustrator)
 

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A little girl begs: ""Mom, can I have a pet?'... She demonstrates how well she would take care of a real animal with her imaginary ones-walking Fluffy (her rock), feeding Nibbles (her woolly glove), and putting fresh water in a bowl for Swishy (her shiny candy wrapper). Ages 3-7

Overview

A little girl begs: ""Mom, can I have a pet?'... She demonstrates how well she would take care of a real animal with her imaginary ones-walking Fluffy (her rock), feeding Nibbles (her woolly glove), and putting fresh water in a bowl for Swishy (her shiny candy wrapper). Ages 3-7

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Every time the little girl asks her mother for a pet she is met with the response, "We'll see." With her creative imagination the girl tries all kinds of substitute pets including a rock, a glove, a candy wrapper, and a balloon. Each is good for about two days but the rock named Fluffy rolls away, the glove called Nibbles soon becomes full when fed, Swishy the candy wrapper eventually sinks in the fish bowl, and Bruce the balloon breaks with a loud bang. It is then that mom leads her to a large box and upon removing the lid she discovers Timmy the kitten... "the best pet in the world". Kids who have ever pestered parents for a pet will applaud the little girl's ingenuity and giggle with delight as they watch her attempts to make the animate objects her pets. The watercolor illustrations are the strong suit here in this gentle mother-daughter story. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Walking past a pet store with her mother, a little girl begs: "Mom, can I have a pet? Please? Mom, Mom, can I? Can I have a pet?" She demonstrates how well she would take care of a real animal with her imaginary ones—walking Fluffy (her rock), feeding Nibbles (her woolly glove), and putting fresh water in a bowl for Swishy (her shiny candy wrapper). Unfortunately imaginary pets are fine for only a day or two—even Bruce (her red balloon) pops. Her mother says, "Oh, that's a shame. Don't worry. Maybe we can find another pet for you to play with." Children's eyes will be drawn to the picture of a large brown box with air holes. On the following spread, against a background of pale purple and white hearts, the little girl holds a black-and-white kitten. Bright, energetic illustrations move the child through her world. She and her mother share similar looks, with fluffy brown hair and wide-set eyes. The simple sentences and frequently repeated phrases will be boons to early readers. This warm mother-daughter story will resonate with children who have wanted and waited for real pets.—Mary Jean Smith, Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589250895
Publisher:
Tiger Tales
Publication date:
03/28/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD70L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. She also creates illustrations for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Time, among many other publications. She lives in New York. Her bestselling books include Pills for Cats: Finding Happiness through Modern Pharmacology, Is Your Dog Gay?, and Is Your Cat Gay?

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