Best Practices in Literacy Instruction, Third Edition

Overview

Recent school reform efforts have emphasized the need for higher literacy standards in schools across the country. Offering practical guidance for literacy educators, curriculum development specialists, and other education professionals and policy makers, this volume considers how we can most effectively improve the quality and content of reading and writing instruction. Leading researchers and practitioners address the eight principles of best practice, providing the most current information on how to enhance ...
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Overview

Recent school reform efforts have emphasized the need for higher literacy standards in schools across the country. Offering practical guidance for literacy educators, curriculum development specialists, and other education professionals and policy makers, this volume considers how we can most effectively improve the quality and content of reading and writing instruction. Leading researchers and practitioners address the eight principles of best practice, providing the most current information on how to enhance students' ability to construct meaning from text independently, draw upon texts to build conceptual understanding, effectively communicate ideas orally and in writing, and develop an intrinsic desire to read and write. This timely book blends state-of-the-art theory and research with workable suggestions based on extensive hands-on experience in the field.

"...addresses the eight principles of best practice, providing the most current information available...blends timely state-of-the-art theory and research with workable suggestions based on extensive hands-on experience."

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Just ahead of the first national reading test in the US and in the midst of a flurry of school reform at all levels, 18 papers from a March 1999 conference at Rutgers University explore perspectives on exemplary practices in literacy, strategies for learning and teaching, and special issues such as creating community and using technology. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)
From the Publisher

"With each chapter written by a nationally known author, the leaders in the field have radically updated the second edition. Newly minted ideas and recent refinements on older ones run through these pages. In these chapters the voices of experience speak loudly and clearly. They ring with an urgent and action-oriented tone. These authors are persuasive about their perspectives for how best to move children toward higher literacy....No more inclusive collection exists for the seasoned teacher and the specialist seeking to be better informed. There is no broader tool kit to equip the professional educator for tomorrow in school."--from the Foreword by John T. Guthrie, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
 

"From editors and authors with wide-ranging expertise, Best Practices in Literacy Instruction, Third Edition, offers a comprehensive view of the field of literacy. Each thought-provoking chapter is rich with evidence-based advice for achieving exemplary reading and writing instruction. Perfect for preservice teachers, master’s students, or inservice teachers, this book will help teachers address the literacy challenges of today’s diverse classrooms."--Mariam Jean Dreher, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, University of Maryland, College Park

"Just when I think our profession is becoming hopelessly divided on how to be smart about the teaching of reading, a book like this comes along--a book that translates research into practice in ways that are important and new. This third edition is a worthy successor to its predecessor. The contributors explain evidence-based practices and demonstrate the ways in which good instruction draws on all kinds of research for its inspiration and support. These authors are among the 'best of the best' in their respective areas. They offer a vision of what good instruction looks like in the classroom, with latitude for professional interpretation and decision making. For the novice, this book offers a beginning plan. For the more experienced teacher, it offers nuanced discussions of familiar topics and takes them to a new level."--Jim Hoffman, PhD, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, University of Texas at Austin
 

"This timely, superbly written third edition addresses the key components of the literacy instruction puzzle. It is comprehensive, up to date, rich, and reader friendly. I highly recommend this volume to inservice and preservice literacy teachers and coaches in elementary and middle grades, as well as to other educators interested in evidence-based literacy practices."--Zhihui Fang, PhD, School of Teaching and Learning, College of Education, University of Florida
 

"In this wonderful third edition, all chapters have been dramatically updated, while maintaining the theme of constructing meaning. Time and again, the editors and contributors demonstrate that best practices lead to balanced instruction. Each chapter challenges readers to consider the complex balance that reading instruction demands. The assessment chapter stands out as promoting a balance among the use of standardized assessments for accountability and process-oriented assessments for instruction. I am also impressed with the emphasis on professional development: The book is full of case study examples that show how high-quality teaching can change student learning. Other strengths of the book include its focus on different forms of instruction, including in-depth descriptions of how to manage small-group instruction within the literacy block. Gambrell et al. are to be commended on a wonderful new edition of this classic text."--Barbara J. Walker, EdD, College of Education, Oklahoma State University; President (2008-2009), International Reading Association

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593853921
  • Publisher: Guilford Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/15/2006
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 418
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda B. Gambrell, PhD, is a Professor in the Eugene T. Moore School of Education at Clemson University. Prior to coming to Clemson University, she was Associate Dean for Research at the University of Maryland. From 1992 to 1997, she was principal investigator at the National Reading Research Center, where she directed the Literacy Motivation Project. Dr. Gambrell began her career as an elementary classroom teacher and reading specialist in the public schools. She has written books on reading instruction and has published in a range of professional journals. She is past president of the National Reading Conference and the College Reading Association and was recently elected to serve as President of the International Reading Association (2007-2008). In 2004 she was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame. Prior awards include the 1998 International Reading Association’s Outstanding Teacher Educator in Reading Award, the 2001 National Reading Conference’s Albert J. Kingston Award, and the 2002 College Reading Associate Laureate Award. Dr. Gambrell's current interests are in the areas of reading comprehension strategy instruction, literacy motivation, and the role of discussion in teaching and learning.

Lesley Mandel Morrow, PhD, holds the rank of Professor II at Rutgers University’s Graduate School of Education, where she is Chair of the Department of Learning and Teaching. She began her career as a classroom teacher, then became a reading specialist, and later received her PhD from Fordham University. Her area of research deals with early literacy development and the organization and management of language arts programs. Her research is carried out with children and families from diverse backgrounds. Dr. Morrow has produced more than 250 publications, including journal articles, chapters, and books. She has received numerous grants from the federal government for her research and has served as a principal research investigator for several research centers. She received Excellence in Research, Teaching, and Service Awards from Rutgers University, as well as the International Reading Association’s Outstanding Teacher Educator in Reading Award and Fordham University’s Alumni Award for Outstanding Achievement. Dr. Morrow was an elected member of the Board of Directors of the International Reading Association and is a past president of that organization. She is an elected member of the Reading Hall of Fame.

Michael Pressley, PhD, who passed away in May 2006, was University Distinguished Professor at Michigan State University, as well as Director of the Doctoral Program in Teacher Education and Director of the Literacy Achievement Research Center, with both roles part of his professorship in the Department of Teacher Education and the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education. He was an expert on effective elementary literacy instruction, with his research appearing in more than 300 journal articles, chapters, and books. Dr. Pressley served a 6-year term as editor of Journal of Educational Psychology. He was honored with awards from the National Reading Conference, the International Reading Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the American Psychological Association, among others. Dr. Pressley received the 2004 E. L. Thorndike Award from Division 15 of the American Psychological Association, the highest award given for career research accomplishment in educational psychology.

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Read an Excerpt

Contents
Foreword, Louise Cherry Wilkinson
Introduction, Dorothy S. Strickland
I. Perspectives on Exemplary Practices in Literacy
1. Principles of Best Practice: Finding the Common Ground, Linda B. Gambrell and Susan Anders Mazzoni
2. Toward a More Complex View of Balance in the Literacy Curriculum, P. David Pearson and Taffy E. Raphael
3. How We Can Achieve Best Practices in Literacy Instruction, James Cunningham
II. Best Practices: Strategies for Learning and Teaching
4. Best Practices for a Balanced Early Literacy Program, Lesley Morrow and Elizabeth Asbury
5. What Should We Do about Phonics?, Patricia M. Cunningham
6. Self-Regulated Comprehension Processing and Its Development through Instruction, Michael Pressley
7. Comprehension: Crafting Understanding, Cathy Collins Block
8. The Role of Literature in Literacy Development, Douglas Fisher, James Flood, and Diane Lapp
9. And in the Center Ring, Basal Readers, Attempting the Ultimate Balancing Act, Nancy L. Roser and James V. Hoffman
10. Key Components of Sound Writing Instruction, Karen Bromley
11. Content Area Literacy Instruction, Thomas Bean, Paul Cantu Valerio, and Lisa Stevens
12. Teaching Literature and Composition in Secondary Schools, Judith Diamondstone and Michael Smith
13. Best Practices in Literacy Assessment, Peter Winograd and Harriette Arrington
III. Best Practices: Special Issues
14. Meeting Each Child's Literacy Needs, Dixie Lee Spiegel
15. Creating Continuity in Early Literacy: Linking Home and School with a Culturally Responsive Approach, Susan B. Neuman
16. Organizing Literacy Instruction: Effective Grouping Strategies and Organizational Plans, D. Ray Reutzel
17. Best Practices in Literacy for Children with Special Needs, Richard Allington
18. The Use of Technology in Literacy Programs, Linda D. Labbo, David Reinking, and Michael McKenna
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Principles of Best Practice: Finding the Common Ground 9
2 Toward a More Complex View of Balance in the Literacy Curriculum 23
3 Current Practices in Early Literacy Development 43
4 What Research Says about Teaching Phonics 65
5 Best Practices in Vocabulary Instruction: What Effective Teachers Do 87
6 Best Practices in Comprehension Instruction 111
7 Fluency in the Classroom: Strategies for Whole-Class and Group Work 127
8 Building a Sound Writing Program 143
9 Material Matters: Using Children's Literature to Charm Readers (or Why Harry Potter and the Princess Diaries Matter) 167
10 Adolescent Literacy 187
11 Best Practices in Literacy Assessment 201
12 Organizing Effective Literacy Instruction: Grouping Strategies and Instructional Routines 241
13 See It Change: A Primer on the Basal Reader 269
14 Strategies for Literacy Development for Students with Disabilities 287
15 Effective Use of Technology in Literacy Instruction 307
16 Achieving Best Practices in Literacy Instruction 333
Index 347
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