Best Practices in Medical Teaching

Best Practices in Medical Teaching

by Stephen M. Stahl, Richard L. Davis
     
 

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In medical education a lot of attention is given to what is said, but less consideration is given to how it is said. There is sometimes a misplaced focus on the content at the expense of the experience for the learner. Best Practices in Medical Teaching illustrates the general principles of effective medical presentation. Stahl and Davis are leading experts in

Overview

In medical education a lot of attention is given to what is said, but less consideration is given to how it is said. There is sometimes a misplaced focus on the content at the expense of the experience for the learner. Best Practices in Medical Teaching illustrates the general principles of effective medical presentation. Stahl and Davis are leading experts in medical communication and they effectively explain the practice and methods behind their success. Applying the principles of adult learning, they provide examples of how to design a successful lecture and teach the reader how to influence the behaviors of their audience. Each chapter ends with a chapter summary, progress check, and a performance self-assessment test to ensure that the concepts are understood. This book is an essential guide for all those involved in the process of educating the next generation of doctors and supporting them through their training.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Jeffrey E Pettit, PhD (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine)
Description: This book attempts to cover every aspect of medical teaching skills outside of the clinical and inpatient areas.
Purpose: One stated purpose is to help novice and experienced medical educators become more effective educators. Another is to provide a tool for all those who undertake the task of helping other clinicians hone their skills through medical education by applying the principles of communication science. In reality, the book seems to focus on every conceivable aspect of presentation skills using supportive materials (charts, graphs, programs) from the field of neuroscience.
Audience: The book will be somewhat helpful to the first group of novice and experienced medical educators and less helpful for the second group, those involved with faculty development and education.
Features: The book applies principles of adult education to presentations, examines the characteristics of all audiences, and discusses how to measure outcomes. The final chapter introduces interval learning and the Master Psychopharmacology Program. Features include an abundance of illustrations, a progress check examination, and performance self-assessments after each chapter. Whenever a noted researcher is mentioned, there is a "biobox" with a brief description of the person and accomplishments. One shortcoming lies in the many pre-1990 references (some as far back as the 1930s and 1940s). More recent research could be referenced. Another shortcoming is that all the example materials (charts, graphs, tables) are heavily focused on psychopharmacology. There are so many of these examples that they detract from the true purpose of having examples.
Assessment: The title is a misrepresentation of the book's content. Best Practices in Medical Education calls to mind teaching in the clinical and inpatient arenas as well as the traditional classroom, but the book's focus is on presentation skills. Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery, Reynolds (New Riders Press, 2008) is a much better source for improving presentation skills. How to Teach: A Handbook for Clinicians, Dobson et al. (Oxford University Press, 2011) is a much better source for clinicians who want to improve their teaching skills. Educators involved with faculty development would be better served using Understanding Medical Education: Evidence, Theory, and Practice, Swanwick (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010). The authors of Best Practices use the kitchen sink approach to cover all the possible angles related to designing medical presentations. The overabundance of psychopharmacological examples creates white noise for readers.
From the Publisher
'This marvellous gem of a book is truly unique. Practical, easy to understand and apply … the authors, true practitioners of their craft, have been considered among the best for years.' Javaid I. Sheikh, MD, MBA, Acting Dean, Professor of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College

'For those interested in becoming 'top notch' presenters, this book will serve as an authoritative source on how to maximize your impact on your audience. This book provides explicit instruction on how to effect real education, striving to go beyond the all-too-often passive diffusion of material from presenter to listener.' Peter F. Buckley, MD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry, Medical College of Georgia

'The information about speaking, learning, and presenting in this book will build your reputation as an effective presenter. Your presentations will be more memorable; your learners will increase their retention and be empowered to apply what they have learned to deliver a higher quality of care.' Thomas L. Schwartz, MD, Associate Professor, Psychiatry Department, SUNY Upstate Medical University

'My only regret is that I have been teaching for more than 30 years without this guidebook … it is a first of its kind! As a residency training director, I will make sure my trainees don't have the same regret.' Sidney Zisook, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521151764
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/30/2011
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Stephen M. Stahl is Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego; Chairman, Neuroscience Education Institute and Honorary Visiting Senior Fellow in Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK.

Richard L. Davis is President of Arbor Scientia, a global medical communications company headquartered in Carlsbad, California.

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