Beth's Story

Beth's Story

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by Susan Beth Pfeffer
     
 

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About the Author: Award-winning author Susan Beth Pfeffer, has written over sixty books for children and young adults. She began her career in 1970, with the publication of her first book, Just Morgan, which she wrote her last semester at New York University.


Ms. Pfeffer's books include middle-grade novels (The Pizza Puzzle),

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Overview

About the Author: Award-winning author Susan Beth Pfeffer, has written over sixty books for children and young adults. She began her career in 1970, with the publication of her first book, Just Morgan, which she wrote her last semester at New York University.


Ms. Pfeffer's books include middle-grade novels (The Pizza Puzzle), historical fiction (Nobody's Daughter and its companion volume Justice for Emily), and young adult novels (Family of Strangers and Twice Taken). Her young adult novel About David was awarded the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award.


Her young adult novel The Year Without Michael, an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and winner of the South Carolina Young Adult Book Award, was named by the American Library Association as one of the hundred best books for teenagers written between 1968-1993.


Susan Beth Pfeffer is also the author of the popular Portraits of Little Women series. Created for readers grades 3-6, each of the books in the series captures one of the beloved March sisters from Little Women--Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy--at age 10. These unforgettable heroines experience the joys and sorrows of sisterhood, family life, and a changing America.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440413516
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
08/14/2001
Series:
Portraits of Little Women Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.66(h) x 0.29(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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An excerpt from Beth's Story

Beth loved all her sisters dearly, but she had a special spot in her heart
for Jo. Still, it seemed unfair that Jo should be allowed to go to New York
and Meg and Amy, both of whose arguments had been quite convincing, should
be made to stay at home.

"No," Beth said. "I'm sorry, Jo. I can't be the one to decide which one
of you goes."

"We could draw lots," Amy said.

"That would be gambling," Meg said. "I think Father and Marmee would prefer
it if we could decide by talking it out."

"We can talk it to death," Amy said, "and we'll still vote for ourselves."

"No," Jo said, looking first at Amy, then at Meg, then at Beth. "I think
there's an obvious answer to our problem. I'll change my vote."



"Oh, Jo!" Meg said. "I'll never forget this. And when I'm in New York, I'll
be sure to pay attention to every single thing and tell you about it, so
tht you can use it in your writing."

"Don't be so sure I'm going to vote for you," said Jo.

"Thank you, Jo!" Amy cried. "I'll do better than Meg. I'll sketch everything
I see, and you can use my pictures when you write about New York!"

"I might not be voting for you either," said Jo.

"Then who?" Meg asked.

"I'm voting for Beth," Jo declared. "I think she should go to New York with
Father and Marmee."

"Beth?" Amy said. "She doesn't even want to go."

"She never said she didn't want to," Jo said. "And it's justlike Beth to
put our happiness ahead of hers. You see it, don't you, Meg? If you go,
Amy and I will resent it. And if I go, you and Amy will resent it. And if
Amy goes, you and I will resent it. But if Beth goes, we'll all be a bit
jealous, but mostly we'll be happy for her."

"Jo's right," Meg said. "Beth is always doing kind things for others and
never asking anything for herself. I vote for Beth to go."

"Beth," Amy said, "you don't have to vote for yourself, you know. You can
vote for me."

"Don't be a selfish beast," Jo said. "Beth, whom do you vote for?"

"I can't vote for myself," Beth said. "It doesn't seem right. But I can't
pick among you either. So I still won't vote."

"Very well," Jo said. "Meg and I vote for Beth. Amy, are you still voting
for yourself?"

"Does it matter?" Amy asked. "I'm bound to lose."

"I think Marmee and Father would be pleased if we could tell them we were
unanimous about Beth's going," Meg said. "Do you think you could do that
for them?"

Amy sighed. "Someday I'll be a great artist," she said. "And a fabulously
rich lady. No thanks to any of you. All right. I vote for Beth to go to
New York. I suppose it's better than Jo, at least."

"Hurrah!" cried Jo. "Our Bethy is going to New York. And we hardly came
close to a civil war to decide it."

Beth hugged Jo and then Meg, who had hopped out of her bed to show her affection
for her younger sister. Amy scowled and left for the bedroom she and Beth
shared.

"She'll get over it," Jo said. "Amy really isn't selfish. She'll be happy
for you soon enough."

Beth hoped so. No trip to New York was worth the loss of her little sister's
love.

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