Betty Zane [NOOK Book]

Overview

After the success of Zane Grey's first novel, Betty Zane, first published in 1903, Grey gave up his dental practice in New York City to concentrate on writing the westerns that would make him as rich and famous as a movie star. But ancestral pride, not money, was the impetus for Betty Zane. It was based on family stories about his great-grandfather, Colonel Ebenezer Zane, who had defended Fort Henry during the American Revolution. West Virginians remember that the colonel's young daughter, Betty, saved the fort ...
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Betty Zane

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Overview

After the success of Zane Grey's first novel, Betty Zane, first published in 1903, Grey gave up his dental practice in New York City to concentrate on writing the westerns that would make him as rich and famous as a movie star. But ancestral pride, not money, was the impetus for Betty Zane. It was based on family stories about his great-grandfather, Colonel Ebenezer Zane, who had defended Fort Henry during the American Revolution. West Virginians remember that the colonel's young daughter, Betty, saved the fort during a British-Indian onslaught in 1782 - the last battle of the Revolutionary War. Her act of courage gives focus to this rousing novel, replete with other historical figures like the ferocious Lewis Wetzel, the notorious renegade Simon Girty, and the Seneca chief Cornplanter. Betty Zane, the headstrong heroine moves in an authentic atmosphere of danger and romance.

This is the story of one of the last battles of the American Revolution and the heroic Betty Zane, who helps save Fort Henry.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609774059
  • Publisher: Start Publishing LLC
  • Publication date: 2/27/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 243,013
  • File size: 355 KB

Meet the Author


The father of the western novel, Zane Grey (1872 - 1939) was born in Zanesville, Ohio. He wrote 58 westerns and almost 30 other books. Over 130 films have been based on his work.

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Read an Excerpt

Betty Zane


By Grey, Zane

Tor Books

Copyright © 1993 Grey, Zane
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780812534658

CHAPTER I
 
 
The Zane family was a remarkable one in early days, and most of its members are historical characters.
The first Zane of whom any trace can be found was a Dane of aristocratic lineage, who was exiled from his country and came to America with William Penn. He was prominent for several years in the new settlement founded by Penn, and Zane street, Philadelphia, bears his name. Being a proud and arrogant man, he soon became obnoxious to his Quaker brethren. He therefore cut loose from them and emigrated to Virginia, settling on the Potomac river, in what was then known as Berkeley county. There his five sons, and one daughter, the heroine of this story, were born.
Ebenezer Zane, the eldest, was born October 7, 1747, and grew to manhood in the Potomac valley. There he married Elizabeth McColloch, a sister of the famous McColloch brotheres so well known in frontier history.
Ebenezer was fortunate in having such a wife and no pioneer could have been better blessed. She was not only a handsome woman, but one of remarkable force of character as well as kindness of heart. She was particularly noted for a rare skill in the treatment of illness, and her deftness in handling the surgeon's knife and extracting a poisoned bullet or arrow from a wound had restored to health many a settler when all had despaired.
The Zane brothers were best known on the border for their athletic prowess, and fortheir knowledge of Indian warfare and cunning. They were all powerful men, exceedingly active and as fleet as deer. In appearance they were singularly pleasing and bore a marked resemblance to one another, all having smooth faces, clear cut, regular features, dark eyes and long black hair.
When they were as yet boys they had been captured by Indians, soon after their arrival on the Virginia border, and had been taken far into the interior, and held as captives for two years. Ebenezer, Silas, and Jonathan Zane were then taken to Detroit and ransomed. While attempting to swim the Scioto river in an effort to escape, Andrew Zane had been shot and killed by his pursuers.
But the bonds that held Isaac Zane, the remaining and youngest brother, were stronger than those of interest or revenge such as had caused the captivity of his brothers. He was loved by an Indian princess, the daughter of Tarhe, the chief of the puissant Huron race. Isaac had escaped on various occasions, but had always been retaken, and at the time of the opening of our story nothing had been heard of him for several years, and it was believed he had been killed.
At the period of the settling of the little colony in the wilderness, Elizabeth Zane, the only sister, was living with an aunt in Philadelphia, where she was being educated.
Colonel Zane's house, a two story structure built of rough hewn logs, was the most comfortable one in the settlement, and occupied a prominent site on the hillside about one hundred yards from the fort. It was constructed of heavy timber and presented rather a forbidding appearance with its square corners, its ominous looking portholes, and strongly barred doors and windows. There were three rooms on the ground floor, a kitchen, a magazine room for military supplies, and a large room for general use. The several sleeping rooms were on the second floor, which was reached by a steep stairway.
The interior of a pioneer's rude dwelling did not reveal, as a rule, more than bare walls, a bed or two, a table and a few chairs--in fact, no more than the necessities of life. But Colonel Zane's house proved an exception to this. Most interesting was the large room. The chinks between the logs had been plastered up with clay and then the walls covered with white birch bark; trophies of the chase, Indian bows and arrows, pipes and tomahawks hung upon them; the wide spreading antlers of a noble buck adorned the space above the mantel piece; buffalo robes covered the couches; bearskin rugs lay scattered about on the hardwood floor. the wall on the western side had been built over a huge stone, into which has been cut an open fireplace.
This blackened recess, which had seen two houses burned over it, when full of blazing logs had cheered many noted men with its warmth. Lord Dunmore, General Clark, Simon Kenton, and Daniel Boone had sat beside that fire. There Cornplanter, the Seneca chief, had made his famous deal with Colonel Zane, trading the island in the river opposite the settlement for a barrel of whiskey. Logan, the Mingo chief and friend of the whites, had smoked many pipes of peace there with Colonel Zane. At a later period, when King Louis Phillippe, who had been exiled from France by Napoleon, had come to America, during the course of his melancholy wanderings he had stopped at Fort Henry a few days. His stay there was marked by a fierce blizzard and the royal guest passed most of his time at Colonel Zane's fireside. Musing by those roaring logs perhaps he saw the radiant star of the Man of Destiny rise to its magnificent zenith.
One cold, raw night in early spring the Colonel had just returned from one of his hunting trips and the tramping of horses mingled with the rough voices of the negro slaves sounded without. When Colonel Zane entered the house he was greeted affectionately by his wife and sister. The latter, at the death of her aunt in Philadelphia, had come west to live with her brother, and had been there since late in the preceding autumn. It was a welcome sight for the eyes of a tired and weary hunter. The tender kiss of his comely wife, the cries of the delighted children, and the crackling of the fire warmed his heart and made him feel how good it was to be home again after a three days' march in the woods. Placing his rifle in a corner and throwing aside his wet hunting coat, he turned and stood with his back to the bright blaze. Still young and vigorous, Colonel Zane was a handsome man. Tall, though not heavy, his frame denoted great strength and endurance. His face was smooth; his heavy eyebrows met in a straight line; his eyes were dark and now beamed with a kindly light; his jaw was square and massive; his mouth resolute; in fact, his whole face was strikingly expressive of courage and geniality. A great wolf dog had followed him in and, tired from travel, had stretched himself out before the fireplace, laying his noble head on the paws he had extended toward the warm blaze.
"Well! Well! I am nearly starved and mighty glad to get back," said the Colonel, with a smile of satisfaction at the steaming dishes a negro servant was bringing from the kitchen.
"We are glad you have returned," answered his wife, whose glowing face testified to the pleasure she felt. "Supper is ready--Annie, bring in some cream--yes, indeed, I am happy that you are home. I never have aa moment's peace when you are away, especially when you are accompanied by Lewis Wetzel."
"Our hunt was a failure," said the Colonel, after he had helped himself to a plate full of roast wild turkey. "The bears have just come out of their winter's sleep and are unusually wary at this time. We saw many signs of their work, tearing rotten logs to pieces in search of grubs and bees' nests. Wetzel killed a deer and we baited a likely place where we had discovered many bear tracks. We stayed up all night in a drizzling rain, hoping to get a shot. I am tired out. So is Tige. Wetzel did not mind the weather or the ill luck, and when we ran across some Indian sign he went off on one of his lonely tramps, leaving me to come home alone."
"He is such a reckless man," remarked Mrs. Zane.
"Wetzel is reckless, or rather, daring. His incomparable nerve carries him safely through many dangers, where an ordinary man would have no show whatever. Well, Betty, how are you?"
"Quite well," said the slender, dark-eyed girl who had just taken the seat opposite the Colonel.
"Bessie, has my sister indulged in any shocking escapade in my absence? I think that last trick of hers, when she gave a bucket of hard cider to that poor tame bear, should last her a spell."
"No, for a wonder Elizabeth has been very good. However, I do not attribute it to any unusual change of temperament; simply the cold, wet weather. I anticipate a catastrophe very shortly if she is kept indoors much longer."
"I have not had much opportunity to be anything but well behaved. If it rains a few days more I shall become desperate. I want to ride my pony, roam the woods, paddle my canoe, and enjoy myself," said Elizabeth.
"Well! Well! Betts, I knew it would be dull here for you, but you must not get discouraged. You know you got here late last fall, and have not had any pleasant weather yet. It is perfectly delightful in May and June. I can take you to fields of wild white honeysuckle and May flowers and wild roses. I know you love the woods, so be patient a little longer."
Elizabeth had been spoiled by her brothers--what girl would not have been by five great big worshippers?--and any trivial thing gone wrong with her was a serious matter to them. They were proud of her, and of her beauty and accomplishments were never tired of talking. She had the dark hair and eyes so characteristic of the Zanes; the same oval face and fine features; and added to this was a certain softness of contour and a sweetness of expression which made her face bewitching. But, in spite of that demure and innocent face, she possessed a decided will of her own, and one very apt to be asserted; she was mischievous; inclined to coquettishness, and more terrible than all she had a fiery temper which could be aroused with the most surprising ease.
Colonel Zane was wont to say that his sister's accomplishments were innumerable. after only a few months on the border she could prepare the flax and weave a linsey dress-cloth with admirable skill. Sometimes to humor Betty the Colonel's wife would allow her to get the dinner, and she would do it in a manner that pleased her brothers, and called forth golden praises from the cook, old Sam's wife, who had been with the family twenty yeas. Betty sang in the little church on Sundays; she organized and taught a Sunday school class; she often beat Colonel Zane and Major McColloch at their favorite game of checkers, which they had played together since they were knee high; in fact, Betty did nearly everything well, from baking pies to painting the birch bark walls of her room. But these things were insignificant in Colonel Zane's eyes. If the Colonel were ever guilty of bragging it was about his sister's ability in those acquirements demanding a true eye, a fleet foot, a strong arm and a daring spirit. He had told all the people in the settlement, to many of whom Betty was unknown, that she could ride like an Indian and shoot with undoubted skill; that she had a generous share of the Zanes' fleetness of foot, and that she would send a canoe over as bad a place as she could find. The boasts of the Colonel remained as yet unproven, but, be that as it may, Betty had, notwithstanding her many faults, endeared herself to all. She made sunshine and happiness everywhere; the old people loved her; the children adored her, and the broad shouldered, heavy footed young settlers were shy and silent, yet blissfully happy in her presence.
"Betty, will you fill my pipe?" asked the Colonel, when he had finished his supper and had pulled his big chair nearer the fire. His oldest child, Noah, a sturdy lad of six, climbed upon his knee and plied him with questions.
"Did you see any bars and bufflers?" he asked, his eyes large and round.
"No, my lad, not one."
"How long will it be until I am big enough to go?"
"Not for a very long time, Noah."
"But I am not afraid of Betty's bar. He growls at me when I throw sticks at him, and snaps his teeth. Can I go with you next time?"
"My brother came over from Short Creek to-day. He has ben to Fort Pitt," interposed Mrs. Zane. As seh was speaking a tap sounded on the door, which, being opened by Betty, disclosed Captain Boggs, his daughter Lydia, and Major Samuel McColloch, the brother of Mrs. Zane.
"Ah, Colonel! I expected to find you at home tonight. The weather has been miserable for hunting and it is not getting any better. The wind is blowing from the northwest and a storm is coming," said Captain Boggs, a fine, soldierly looking man.
"Hello, Captain! How are you? Sam, I have not had the pleasure of seeing you for a long time," replied Colonel Zane, as he shook hands with his guests.
Major Mccolloch was the eldest of the brothers of that name. As an Indian killer he ranked next to the intrepid Wetzel; but while Wetzel preferred to take his chances alone and track the Indians through the un-trodden wilds, McColloch was a leader of expeditions against the savages. A giant in stature, massive in build, bronzed and bearded, he looked the typical frontiersman. His blue eyes were like those of his sister and his voice had the same pleasant ring.
"Major McColloch, do you remember me?" asked Betty.
"Indeed I do," he answered, with a smile. "You were a little girl, running wild, on the Potomac when I last saw you!"
"Do you remember when you used to lift me on your horse and give me lessons in riding?"
"I remember better than you. How you used to stick on the back of that horse was a mystery to me."
"Well, I shall be ready soon to go on with those lessons in riding. I have heard of your wonderful leap over the hill and I should like to have you tell me all about it. Of all the stories I have heard since I arrived at Fort Henry, the one of your ride and leap for life is the most wonderful."
"Yes, Sam, she will bother you to death about that ride, and will try to give you lessons in leaping down precipices. I should not be at all surprised to find her trying to duplicate your feat. You know the Indian pony I got from that fur trader last summer. Well, he is as wild as a deer and she has been riding him without his being broken," said Colonel Zane.
"Some other time I shall tell you about my jump over the hill. Just now I have important matters to discuss," answered the Major to Betty.
It was evident that something unusual had occurred, for after chatting a few moments the three men withdrew into the magazine room and conversed in low, earnest tones.
Lydia Boggs was eighteen, fair haired and blue eyed. Like Betty she had received a good education, and, in that respect, was superior to the border girls, who seldom knew more than to keep house and to make linen. At the outbreak of the Indian wars General Clark had stationed Captain Boggs at Fort Henry and Lydia had lived there with him two years. After Betty's arrival, which she hailed with delight, the girls had become fast friends.
Lydia slipped her arm affectionately around Betty's neck and said, "Why did you not come over to the Fort to-day?"
"It has been such an ugly day, so disagreeable altogether, that I have remained indoors."
"You missed something," said Lydia, knowingly.
"What do you mean? What did I miss?"
"Oh, perhaps, after all, it will not interest you."
"How provoking! Of course it will. Anything or anybody would interest me tonight. Do tell me, please."
"It isn't much. Only a young soldier came over with Major McColloch."
"A soldier? From Fort Pitt? Do I know him? I have met most of the officers."
"No, you have never seen him. He is a stranger to all of us."
"There does not seem to be so much in your news," said Betty, in a disappointed tone. "To be sure, strangers are a rarity in our little village, but, judging from the strangers who have visited us in the past, I imagine this one cannot be much different."
"Wait until you see him," said Lydia, with a serious little nod of her head.
"Come, tell me all about him," said Betty, now much interested.
"Major McColloch brought him in to see papa, and he was introduced to me. He is a southerner and from one of those old families. I could tell by his cool, easy, almost reckless air. He is handsome, tall and fair, and his face is frank and open. He has such beautiful manners. He bowed low to me and really I felt so embarrassed that I hardly spoke. You know I am used to these big hunters seizing your hand and giving it a squeeze which makes you want to scream. Well, this young man is different. He is a cavalier. All the girls are in love with him already. So will you be."
"I? Indeed not. But how refreshing. You must have been strongly impressed to see and remember all you have told me."
"Betty Zane, I remember so well because he is just the man you described one day when we were building castles and telling each other what kind of a hero we wanted."
"Girls, do not talk such nonsense," interrupted the Colonel's wife, who was perturbed by the colloquy in the other room. She had seen those ominous signs before. "Can you find nothing better to talk about?"
Meanwhile Colonel Zane and his companions were earnestly discussing certain information which had arrived that day. A friendly Indian runner had brought news to Short Creek, a settlement on the river between Fort Henry and Fort Pitt, of an intended raid by the Indians all along the Ohio valley. Major McColloch, who had been warned by Wetzel of the fever of unrest among the Indians--a fever which broke out every spring--had gone to Fort Pitt with the hope of bringing back reinforcements, but, excepting the young soldier, who had volunteered to return with him, no help could he enlist, so he journeyed back post-haste to Fort Henry.
The information he brought disturbed Captain Boggs, who commanded the garrison, as a number of men were away on a logging expedition up the river, and were not expected to raft down to the Fort for two weeks.
Jonathan Zane, who had been sent for, joined the trio at this moment, and was acquainted with the particulars. The Zane Brothers were always consulted where any question concerning Indian craft and cunning was to be decided. Colonel Zane had a strong friendly influence with certain tribes, and his advice was invaluable. Jonathan Zane hated the sight of an Indian and except for his knowledge as a scout, or Indian tracker or fighter, he was of little use in a council. Colonel Zane informed the men of the fact that Wetzel and he had discovered Indian tracks within ten miles of the Fort, and he dwelt particularly on the disappearance of Wetzel.
"Now, you can depend on what I say. There are Wy-andots in force on the war path. Wetzel told me to dig for the Fort and he left me in a hurry. We were near that cranberry bog over at the foot of Bald mountain. I do not believe we shall be attacked. In my opinion the Indians would come up from the west and keep to the high ridges along Yellow creek. They always come that way. But, of course, it is best to know surely, and I daresay Lew will come in to-night or to-morrow with the facts. In the meantime put out some scouts back in the woods and let Jonathan and the Major watch the river."
"I hope Wetzel will come in," said the Major. "We can trust him to know more about the Indians than nay one. It was a week before you and he went hunting that I saw him. I went to Fort Pitt and tried to bring over some men, but the garrison is short and they need men as much as we do. A young soldier named Clarke volunteered to come and I brought him along with me. He has not seen any Indian fighting, but he is a likely looking chap, and I guess will do. Captain Boggs will give him a place in the block house if you say so."
"By all means. We shall be glad to have him," said Colonel Zane.
"It would not be so serious if I had not sent the men up the river," said Captain Boggs, in anxious tones. "Do you think it possible they might have fallen in with the Indians?"
"It is possible, of course, but not probable," answered Colonel Zane. "The Indians are all across the Ohio. Wetzel is over there and he will get here long before they do."
"I hope it may be as you say. I have much confidence in your judgmetn," returned Captain Boggs. "I shall put our scouts and take all the precaution possible. We must return now. Come, Lydia."
"Whew! What an awful night this is going to be," said Colonel Zane, when he had closed the door after his guests' departure. "I should not care to sleep out to-night."
"Eb, what will Lew Wetzel do on a night like this?" asked Betty, curiously.
"Oh, Lew will be as snug as a rabbit in his burrow," said Colonel Zane, laughing. "In a few moments he can build a birch bark shack, start a fire inside and go to sleep comfortably."
"Ebenezer, what is all this confab about? What did my brother tell you?" asked Mrs. Zane, anxiously.
"We are in for more trouble from the Wyandots and Shawnees. But, Bessie, I don't believe it will come soon. We are too well protected here for anything but a protracted siege."
Colonel Zane's light and rather evasive answer did not deceive his wife. She knew her brother and her husband would not wear anxious faces for nothing. Her usually bright face clouded with a look of distress. She had seen enough of Indian warfare to make her shudder with horror at the mere thought. Betty seemed unconcerned. She sat down beside the dog and patted him on the head.
"Tige, Indians! Indians!" she said.
The dog growled and showed his teeth. It was only necessary to mention Indians to arouse his ire.
"The dog has been uneasy of late," continued Colonel Zane. "He found the Indian tracks before Wetzel did. You know how Tige hates Indians. Ever since he came home with Isaac four years ago he has been of great service to the scouts, as he possesses so much intelligence and sagacity. Tige followed Isaac home the last time he escaped from the Wyandots. When Isaac was in captivity he nursed and cared for the dog after he had been brutally beaten by the redskins. Have you ever heard that long mournful howl Tige gives out sometimes in the dead of night?"
"Yes I have, and it makes me cover up my head," said Betty.
"Well, it is Tige mourning for Isaac," said Colonel Zane.
"Poor Isaac," murmured Betty.
"Do you remember him? It has been nine years since you saw him," said Mrs. Zane.
"Remember Isaac? Indeed I do. I shall never forget him. I wonder if he is still living?"
"Probably not. It is now four years since he was recaptured. I think it would have been impossible to keep him that length of time, unless, of course, he has married that Indian girl. The simplicity of the Indian nature is remarkable. He could easily have deceived them and made them believe he was content in captivity. Probably, in attempting to escape again, he has been killed as was poor Andrew."
Brother and sister gazed with dark, sad eyes into the fire, now burned down to a glowing bed of coals. The silence remained unbroken save for the moan of the rising wind outside, the rattle of hall, and the patter of rain drops on the roof.
 
All new material in this edition copyright 1993 by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC.


Continues...

Excerpted from Betty Zane by Grey, Zane Copyright © 1993 by Grey, Zane. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 69 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(25)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 69 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2008

    One of the best books I have ever set eyes on!

    Betty Zane is an outstanding book! It is really good and based on real events that took place. Betty Zane is the story of the real Betty Zane but in fiction form. It takes place in the beautiful Fort Henry area which is now Whelling, West Virginia, and is still gourgous today. The book has everything in it from Indians, Romance, bravery, and History. If you haven't read this book yet you have really missed out!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

    Great for those who love histrolical fiction!

    I'm 13 ,but I love histrolical fiction, I found that there are a few miss spellings. Such as they said beer when they meant been. W ere when they meant were. And bar when they meant bear, to name a few. But it's only once every other page ,and nothing you can't tell what they mean it to be. Over all a lovely book ,and wonderfully writien!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2007

    Outstanding!

    A wonderful book for anyone who likes frontier, adventure, female heroines, Indian novels, Historical things...ect. ect. ect. The list gose on and on. I LOVED the book. Beautifully written set in the Ohio Valley in now-a-day Whelling West Virginia. Excelent Book!

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 8, 2013

    Recommended

    Reading this will tell you why Zane Grey was so well respected as a writer and teller of tales of the West. Excellent read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Dont get it!

    It really was hard to read. I couldnt even get into the story because every other word was a major typo. I do not recomend this version, it is very poor quality.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    Sophia

    Great

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    So boring

    I havent even got through the whole thing yet i like books that u cant put down any suggestions?i loved puting this down

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2011

    Awesome book!!!

    This is like the most awesome book ever I highly recomend this to anyone that likes to read books with a little bit of everything in it. I will admit that it does have a few boring parts in it but all in all it is a VERY good book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2011

    Good read

    Good story, this particular copy was free and there were many typo's, had to guess what some of the words were. Probably the for sale copy has all that corrected. The book seems to historically accurate. Anyway enjoyed reading it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2009

    BettyZane

    wonderful book. Very interesting. Good true story of our first ancestors who settled the Ohio Valley and fought for their survival. Well written.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    good

    Ejoyed this bok

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    ~ Be yourself. Don't be afraid to show people the real you. If they expect you to change, ditch them. They either accept who you are, or they ge out of your life. You don't need someone in your life who forces you to change just for them. If you want to change, do it for you, not someone else. &hearts <br> ~ Beauty is on the inside, not the outside. &hearts <br> ~ How can someone be so beautiful on the outside, but on the inside, ugly? &hearts <br> ~ I'm not saying you're ugly, just the way you act is. &hearts <br> ~ Don't rely on people. &hearts <br> ~ Don't let people walk all over you. Otherwise, they'd treat you like a stepping stool. Only using you when they can't reach their goals on their own. Or using you only when they begin to sink. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    | I'm going to start putting more than one quote in a post. I have probably hundreds of quotes. If I did not write them myself, I will either put ' - Unknown ' or the Author's name. If you use these quotes, please give me credit.. Thanks. Also, please do not post in these books. I will find a book where you can post reviews or whatever. Just not here. Thanks again. | <p> Live crazy. Be wild. Embrace yourself. &hearts <br> Show the world the real you. &hearts <br> Be unique. Be weird. For, the world is a boring place with normal people. &hearts <br> I'm not God, so don't expect me to be perfect. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    Find a person who makes you happy. Someone who is there when you need them. Someone who is proud of who you are. Someone who loves you for you. Make it someone you want to spend the rest of your life with. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree -Note-

    | Okay, you can post reviews or whatever you'd like to say to me at 'qb' result one. If it helps, the book is: QB 1 By: Mike Lupica |

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    Live everyday like it's your last day, for tomorrow is not a gurantee. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    No matter how hard life gets, don't give up. You are someone's reason to live. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2014

    Quotes | By Bree

    It seems like right when you want to end it all, someone or something great walks into your life, making you want to stay. &hearts

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2012

    How unfotunate

    My grandfather was an avid reader of Zane Grey's novels, so I was looking forward to the woman's perspective in this book. But the nook version is horrible. There are so many unusual punctuation, wrong letters, numbers, and symbols in the copy that it's very, very difficult to read. The constant translating exhausted me before I even reached the end of the first chapter. So sorry, but had to give up.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    Zane Grey's best book

    This book is a fun, light read. It is romantic, exciting, and novel (in its own way). I think that you will enjoy it if that is what you're looking for. You will not enjoy it if you expect literary genius. Grey puts out a great romp!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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