Between East And West

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$76.73
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $7.94
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 90%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $7.94   
  • New (2) from $14.99   
  • Used (5) from $7.94   

Overview

With this book we see a philosopher well steeped in the Western tradition thinking through ancient Eastern disciplines, meditating on what it means to learn to breathe, and urging us all at the dawn of a new century to rediscover indigenous Asian cultures. Yogic tradition, according to Irigaray, can provide an invaluable means for restoring the vital link between the present and eternity -- and for re-envisioning the patriarchal traditions of the West.

Western, logocentric rationality tends to abstract the teachings of yoga from its everyday practice -- most importantly, from the cultivation of breath. Lacking actual, personal experience with yoga or other Eastern spiritual practices, the Western philosophers who have tried to address Hindu and Buddhist teachings -- particularly Schopenhauer -- have frequently gone astray. Not so, Luce Irigaray. Incorporating her personal experience with yoga into her provocative philosophical thinking on sexual difference, Irigaray proposes a new way of understanding individuation and community in the contemporary world. She looks toward the indigenous, pre-Aryan cultures of India -- which, she argues, have maintained an essentially creative ethic of sexual difference predicated on a respect for life, nature, and the feminine.

Irigaray's focus on breath in this book is a natural outgrowth of the attention that she has given in previous books to the elements -- air, water, and fire. By returning to fundamental human experiences -- breathing and the fact of sexual difference -- she finds a way out of the endless sociologizing abstractions of much contemporary thought to rethink questions of race, ethnicity, and globalization.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Religious Studies Review

[Irigaray's] notion that women breathe differently from men carry provactive implications, and the book offers a fresh approach to women's empowerment.

Ascent Magazine

It remains a cause for celebration when a philosopher such as Irigaray not only talks about yoga, but makes it part of her practice.

Library Journal
What happens when a distinguished French feminist philosopher and psychoanalyst takes yoga lessons? Irigaray gets some shocks and some good ideas, too. She chafes at the male sexist attitude of some yoga teachers and concludes that "patriarchal censorships and repressions" encroached upon a once healthier aboriginal tradition in India. Irigaray also believes that the differences between men and women can play an important role in the emergence of the love that is our best hope something quite possible within an Eastern tradition that understands its resources (Western misunderstandings, including Schopenhauer's, take a beating here). She comes to believe that breathing is a way of focusing the body and that the idea of shared breath is more fundamental than the idea of exchangeable words. Most readers will not be persuaded that, for instance, there is a difference between male and female breathing, but this is a fresh look at the need for East and West to get together, and Irigaray's notion of a community without gender wars is important. Leslie Armour, Univ. of Ottawa Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Luce Irigaray, a director of research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris, is the leading feminist philosopher in France. She is author of more than twenty books, including Speculum of the Other Woman, This Sex Which Is Not One, The Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche (Columbia), and The Forgetting of Air in Martin Heidegger.

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface to the English EditionThe Time of LifeEastern TeachingsThe Way of BreathBeing I, Being WeThe Family Begins with TwoApproaching the Other as OtherMixing: A Principle for Refounding Community

Columbia University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)