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Between Eras from Capitalism to Democracy
     

Between Eras from Capitalism to Democracy

by Albion Woodbury Small
 
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026750078
Publisher:
V.W. Bruder
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
732 KB

Read an Excerpt


III THE CRISIS "It would surrender the fundamental principle that every business must be run by its owners, not by outsiders." AS Lyon entered the "Twentieth Century" Saturday afternoon, the Conductor handed him a bunch of letters and telegrams. He ordered a table for his compartment, and sent for the stenographer. Before the train had passed West Point, answers to the letters were ready for his signature. Among the telegrams sent out at Albany was an order to his chauffeur to have his car at the Van Buren St. station at 8:55 the next morning. Another read:— "Mr. Walther Kissinger, 4608 Woodlawn Ave., Chicago. Meet me at office tomorrow (Sunday) morning at nine. LOGAN LYON." Kissinger was precisely on time, but he found Lyon already at his desk. Their greeting was that of men whose working relations were mutually satisfactory, without suggestion of further intimacy. "It's rough to call you down here Sunday morning, Mr. Kissinger, but we'll get through in time to go to church, and that's my cue today at any rate. It will help settle my mind into the proper spirit if you tell me the worst up to date; and I can talk a little more to the point with my father this afternoon if the facts are in the back of my head during the service." "We know nothing of importance beyond what I wired, except that late last night I got a pretty straight tip about the proposition the officers will ask the unions to endorse today." "Is it the general strike?" "No, at the start it's just the opposite. Whether the leaders have had this move in mind all along, or whether the new plan is an afterthought, I can't say. The last word, however, is for a complete change of front. Nothing that has beenin dispute for the last two months is to be pressed, for a while at any rate,...

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