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Between Madison and Palmetto
     

Between Madison and Palmetto

5.0 1
by Jacqueline Woodson
 

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Margaret and Maizon are back together on Madison Street, but their friendship is different now. Margaret needs more time alone, and it's not just the two of them any more-their new neighbor and classmate, Caroline, has become part of their lives. But that seems minor next to what is about to happen to Maizon. . . .

"Woodson's candid assessments of relations between

Overview

Margaret and Maizon are back together on Madison Street, but their friendship is different now. Margaret needs more time alone, and it's not just the two of them any more-their new neighbor and classmate, Caroline, has become part of their lives. But that seems minor next to what is about to happen to Maizon. . . .

"Woodson's candid assessments of relations between blacks and whites are as searching as ever, and her characters just as commanding." (Publishers Weekly)

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Completing the trilogy begun with Last Summer with Maizon and Maizon at Blue Hill , Woodson revisits her heroines Margaret and Maizon as their close friendship is newly tested. Undergoing the transformations of adolescence, they also find their Brooklyn neighborhood changing, with new buildings erected and white people, such as Carolyn Berg, moving in. Lately, Maizon has been spending more time with Carolyn, and Margaret feels excluded. Developing physically, Margaret also feels overweight, a misperception that leads to symptoms of bulimia and a near-starvation diet. Maizon, meanwhile, struggles with the sudden appearance of her father, who has contacted her for the first time since he left her with her grandmother following her mother's death in childbirth. As in the previous novels, Woodson stresses the importance of friends and family, but the impact here is somewhat diluted by the movie-of-the-week problems that challenge the two girls. Her candid assessments of relations between blacks and whites are as searching as ever, however, and her characters just as commanding. Ages 10-14. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-The story of friends Margaret and Maizon, two African-American 12-year-olds living in Brooklyn, continues in this book. Last Summer with Maizon (Doubleday, 1990) revolved around Margaret. Maizon at Blue Hill (Delacorte, 1992) focused on Maizon during her brief stay on scholarship at an exclusive boarding school. This third book gives equal time to both characters. Maizon's part of the story is about her new relationships-with a white girl who has moved to the neighborhood, and with her father, who has suddenly reappeared after a 12-year absence. Margaret is still hurting from the death of her father. She's worried about her changing body, and has resorted to fad diets and forced vomiting. In the end, their friendship is strengthened, Maizon has accepted her dad, and Margaret has accepted her body. The mood is one of familial warmth and growing friendships, but the characters are a bit flat. The plot is too thin to sustain interest, and the conflicts are tied up a little too neatly. Readers who enjoyed the first two books might want to complete the trilogy with this one, but it's doubtful that it will create any new fans for these two girls.-Marilyn Long Graham, Lee County Library System, Fort Myers, FL

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698119581
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Series:
Margaret and Maizon Series , #3
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
871,039
Product dimensions:
5.02(w) x 7.73(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Born on February 12th in Columbus, Ohio, Jacqueline Woodson grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and Brooklyn, New York and graduated from college with a B.A. in English. She now writes full-time and has recently received the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. Her other awards include a Newbery Honor, two Coretta Scott King awards, two National Book Award finalists, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Although she spends most of her time writing, Woodson also enjoys reading the works of emerging writers and encouraging young people to write, spending time with her friends and her family, and sewing. Jacqueline Woodson currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

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Between Madison and Palmetto 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just wanted to be the first to write a revew