Between Two Worlds: Realism, Idealism, and the Future of American Foreign Policy

Overview

With Between Two Worlds, David Callahan, author of Dangerous Capabilities: Paul Nitze and the Cold War, has written a provocative analysis of one of the most critical issues facing our nation: what course America's foreign policy should take in the post-Cold War era. The fall of the Soviet Union and an upsurge in global violence have left American foreign policy adrift in recent years. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written, Between Two Worlds unravels a muddled debate to argue that the United States now ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $3.95   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$3.95
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(661)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
{NEW} Hardback with Dust Jacket. FIRST EDITION. Remainder mark on bottom of page edges.

Ships from: Luzerne, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.34
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(148)

Condition: New
1994-12 Hardcover New Beautiful brand new condition book, no marks, no wear, appears unread. Then we send you a confirmation e-mail. We appreciate your business and welcome any ... questionsMendoPower Employment Services will immediately and carefully pack this book in high-quality bubble lined, envelopes. Then we send you a confirmation e-mail. We appreciate your business and welcome any questions. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Fort Bragg, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$15.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(317)

Condition: New
1st Edition, Fine-/Fine 1/8" DJ tear head of spine, 1/2" red ink kiss mark on front free endpaper, o.w. clean, tight & bright. NO ink names, bookplates, etc. Price unclipped. ... ISBN 006018213X Read more Show Less

Ships from: Troy, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

With Between Two Worlds, David Callahan, author of Dangerous Capabilities: Paul Nitze and the Cold War, has written a provocative analysis of one of the most critical issues facing our nation: what course America's foreign policy should take in the post-Cold War era. The fall of the Soviet Union and an upsurge in global violence have left American foreign policy adrift in recent years. Exhaustively researched and elegantly written, Between Two Worlds unravels a muddled debate to argue that the United States now faces a basic choice between the foreign-policy strategies of realism and idealism. Realists, still dominant in Washington even with the Cold War's end, are preoccupied with safeguarding global order by keeping U.S. forces deployed in Europe and Asia and by preparing to fight new enemies in the Third World. They insist that America must continue the production of weapons begun during the 1980s and maintain defense budgets at near-Cold War levels. Idealists, Callahan among them, bring a more hopeful view to reinventing foreign policy. Callahan mounts a sweeping critique of realism to show how policymakers may be exaggerating the threats confronting the United States. Updating the idealist tradition pioneered by Woodrow Wilson, Between Two Worlds argues that U.S. actions abroad can and should be guided by the values that Americans treasure at home. Callahan's bold strategy for overhauling America's foreign policy would use some funds now spent on defense for new efforts to help fledgling democracies, strengthen international institutions, and promote sustainable development in the Third World. A controversial look at current U.S. foreign policy and a blueprint for more effective American leadership into the twenty-first century, Between Two Worlds is a valuable contribution to one of the most urgent tasks facing us.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060182137
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/1/1994
  • Edition description: 1st ed
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224

Read an Excerpt

Between Two Worlds




Becoming Number One


A common understanding of how the United States rose to primacy holds thatafter World War II, America was the strongest nation in the world but onewith little appetite for leadership. It stood ready to manage the worldeconomy but otherwise was inclined toward renewed isolation, eschewing alliancecommitments and any permanent overseas military deployments. But with therise of the Soviet threat the United States was again called to duty, grudginglymanning the ramparts of the free world and patiently waiting for a containedenemy to exhaust itself.
The belief that America became a global power out of exigency, not desire,suggests that the United States can now escape from the geopolitical exertionsand military expenditures forced upon it by the Cold War. With the SovietUnion gone, the question goes, shouldn't the United States be able to relinquishthe burden of ensuring world security and turn the bulk of its attentionto domestic problems?
Perhaps so, and this book will explore that possibility. The constructionof the question is simplistic, however, as is the storyline from which itsprings. A more accurate understanding of America's rise to primacy holdsthat the United States was indeed isolationist before World War II, butnot as blithely so as is commonly supposed. In fact, American leaders alwaysmonitored stability—and its absence—across the oceans. As far back asJefferson, U.S. leaders worried about the balance of power in Europe, whichwas seen as critically affecting North American security. They also worriedabout the balance in Asia and, beginning in the late 1800s,actively soughtto prevent any one power from dominating that region.
Following World War II it was not only, or even largely, the Communist threatthat propelled Washington to assume a position of international leadership.Instead, by the early 1940s, before the Communist threat was clearly evident,a consensus was emerging among foreign policy elites that the United Stateshad to be permanently engaged in maintaining global stability. It had tobecome the world's leading power because the international system neededa leader and because nobody else could play that role.
The consensus behind primacy had its roots in the changing American thinkingabout the nature of world politics. World War II was only the most recentreminder that U.S. security and prosperity were inextricably linked to stabilityin Europe and Asia and to friendly control of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.Various American political leaders and strategists had long highlightedthese realities, believing isolation to be a chimera. World War II assuredthat these arguments finally achieved ascendancy among political elites.
A simultaneous and closely related development was the conversion of U.S.foreign policy elites to the tenets of political realism. Realism rejectedboth idealism and isolationism. It held that the world was a dangerous placein which the struggle for power among nations was unending. America couldneither escape involvement in this struggle nor end it by reforming theinternational system, as Woodrow Wilson had sought to do after World WarI. Realists argued that the United States had to remain perpetually vigilant,worrying first and foremost about its survival in the way other nationshad for centuries. It could no longer ignore the balance of power in crucialareas of the world as it had in the past, but instead it would have to workrelentlessly to assure that the balance never tipped in a threatening direction.American primacy was seen as essential to this task, since the twentiethcentury had shown that the weight of an outside nation was needed to maintaina balance of power in Europe and Asia.
The Cold War served to amplify and validate these views among U.S. foreignpolicy elites; it was not the occasion for inventing them. Today, thosewho are perplexed by America's failure to quickly shed its internationalresponsibilities have failed to read their history. They mistakenly believethat anticommunism was the principal, if not the sole, rationale for Americanprimacy. They thus imagine that the arguments for U.S. primacy collapsedalong with Soviet power. In a further mistake, some charge that attemptsto sustain that primacy are rooted in bureaucratic inertia, vested military-industrialinterests, and in a plain unwillingness to change old habits and dated thinking.
Now that the Cold War is over, U.S. foreign policy is undergoing substantialmodifications. The Clinton Administration has pushed for changes that aresomewhat more ambitious than those favored by George Bush and his advisors,but fundamentally the case for American global primacy remains unchallengedin the U.S. foreign policy establishment. To understand why so many insistthat the United States must remain number one it is necessary to betterunderstand why the United States became number one in the first place. Inlarge part, this means understanding how concern with stability in Europeand Asia, always present in U.S. foreign policy, finally became its dominantcharacteristic by the middle of the twentieth century.

In Search of Stability: The American
Geopolitical Tradition
During the early days of the republic, primacy in international affairswas not the goal of U.S. foreign policy. Instead, the overriding challengefor the former colonies was mere survival, and in an age dominated by thegreat powers of Europe, this was no sure thing.
The conventional telling of American history suggests that the young UnitedStates maintained a scrupulously isolationist stance, avoiding the reviledworld of European power politics. This is only partly true. There were,to be sure, powerful isolationist tendencies in the early republic. "Weshould separate ourselves as far as possible and as long as possible fromall European politics and wars," John Adams said in 1776, expressingthe sentiments of many. A resolution adopted in 1783 by the ContinentalCongress declared: "The true interest of these states requires thatthey should be as little as possible entangled in the politics and controversiesof the European nations." Washington's famous farewell address, inwhich he said that "Europe has a set of primary interests, which tous have none, or a very remote relation" and in which he called foran avoidance of "permanent alliances" was the quintessential statementof early U.S. isolationism.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
1 Becoming Number One 9
2 Realism, Idealism, and America's Rise to Primacy 37
3 Primacy Reaffirmed: Staying Number One After the Cold War 64
4 Realism vs. Idealism in Post-Cold War Foreign Policy 99
5 Armed for Primacy 134
6 A Safer World: International Relations After the Cold War 173
7 Reconsidering American Primacy 222
8 An Idealist Foreign Policy 271
Conclusion 309
Notes 313
Index 381
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)