×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Beware of the Frog
     

Beware of the Frog

by William Bee
 

See All Formats & Editions

With deliciously ugly villains and a gasp-inducing ending, this quirky tale of the unexpected will have readers croaking with laughter.

Sweet old Mrs. Collywobbles lives on the edge of a big, dark, scary wood, so it’s a good thing that she has a pet frog to protect her. Too bad for the Greedy Goblin, the Smelly Troll, and the Giant Hungry Ogre, who don&

Overview

With deliciously ugly villains and a gasp-inducing ending, this quirky tale of the unexpected will have readers croaking with laughter.

Sweet old Mrs. Collywobbles lives on the edge of a big, dark, scary wood, so it’s a good thing that she has a pet frog to protect her. Too bad for the Greedy Goblin, the Smelly Troll, and the Giant Hungry Ogre, who don’t take this little amphibian seriously (GOBBLE)!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - JoAn Watson Martin
If a sweet little old lady lives on the edge of scary dark woods, she definitely needs protection. Mrs. Collywobbles moves from one room of her house to another, always watching outside, but she sees her pet frog sitting on the steps, and the lovable expression on his face contrasts with her anxious face peering out the window. Luckily her pet frog is most effective at taking care of such villains as Greedy Goblin, Smelly Troll, and Hungry Orge. The art work in this book invites the reader to study carefully, since each villain comes with the dress and collections of his trade. Typical of fairy tales, three is the magic number. Now, Mrs. Collywobbles does not have to hide any longer. It works best if, the reader has read The Frog Prince, so that he or she is able to understand when this spoof ends appropriately with a twist and a "Burp!" Reviewer: JoAn Watson Martin
School Library Journal

Gr 1-4- This is a quirky story in which an old woman who lives alone at the edge of a dark, scary wood is protected by her pet frog. The creature easily handles any danger by swallowing each potential evildoer whole. The first villain to meet his fate is Greedy Goblin, followed by Smelly Troll, and finally Giant Hungry Ogre. As each bad guy nears Mrs. Collywobbles's house, he recites a rhyme themed around his distinct characteristics. "Nickerty-noo, nickerty-noo,/if I get a chance,/I'll steal from you," sings Greedy Goblin. The tale ends with a wicked twist. The narration and illustrations are joined tightly together. The text describes the scene in the pictures, pointing out specific things to notice. "Look! There is little Mrs. Collywobbles, hiding in her bathroom." The pen-and-ink and Macintosh artwork statically captures the "action" and creatively portrays each character. As he gobbles each villain, the frog sits passively with the feet, tail, and clothes of his victim hanging out of his mouth. Bright, flat colors contrast sharply against the white background. Stylized flowers and leaves give the pictures a 1960s look. The odd deadpan humor will not appeal to every child, but older readers and literature students will appreciate the irony of this almost fairy tale.-Carolyn Janssen, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH

Kirkus Reviews
Joining the rapidly swelling ranks of seemingly innocuous tales for younglings in which main characters are suddenly killed off, this charming outing stars sweet little old Mrs. Collywobbles and the small attack frog that guards her doorstep. The doorstep needs guarding too, as out of the adjacent "big, dark, scary wood" shamble a Greedy Goblin ("Nickerty-noo, nickerty-noo, / if I get a chance / I'll steal from you . . . "), a Smelly Troll and a Giant Hungry Ogre in succession. All meet the same fate, depicted on spreads with the single word "GOBBLE" and a view of the frog with various disconnected body parts hanging out of its mouth. Mrs. Collywobbles rewards the frog with a transformative kiss-which sets the stage for a final bit of snacking. Set in a mottled, woodsy landscape filled with stylized flowers and leaves, and populated with creatures more ugly than scary-looking, the episode fits neatly among the equally unsettling likes of Jeanne Willis's Tadpole's Promise (2005), illustrated by Tony Ross, and Kara LaReau's Ugly Fish (2006), illustrated by Scott Magoon. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763639204
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
06/24/2008
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 8.23(h) x 0.38(d)
Lexile:
AD630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

William Bee is the author-illustrator of AND THE TRAIN GOES . . . and WHATEVER. He lives in the English countryside.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews