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Beware, Princess Elizabeth (Young Royals Series)
     

Beware, Princess Elizabeth (Young Royals Series)

4.6 75
by Carolyn Meyer
 

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Imprisonment. Betrayal. Lost love. Murder. What more must a princess endure?

Elizabeth Tudor's teenage and young adult years during the turbulent reigns of Edward and then Mary Tudor are hardly those of a fairy-tale princess. Her mother has been beheaded by Elizabeth's own father, Henry VIII; her jealous half sister, Mary, has her locked away in the Tower of London

Overview

Imprisonment. Betrayal. Lost love. Murder. What more must a princess endure?

Elizabeth Tudor's teenage and young adult years during the turbulent reigns of Edward and then Mary Tudor are hardly those of a fairy-tale princess. Her mother has been beheaded by Elizabeth's own father, Henry VIII; her jealous half sister, Mary, has her locked away in the Tower of London; and her only love interest betrays her in his own quest for the throne.

Told in the voice of the young Elizabeth and ending when she is crowned queen, this second novel in the exciting series explores the relationship between two sisters who became mortal enemies. Carolyn Meyer has written an intriguing historical tale that reveals the deep-seated rivalry between a determined girl who became one of England's most powerful monarchs and the sister who tried everything to stop her. 5-1/2 X 8-1/4.

Author Biography: Carolyn Meyer is the celebrated author of more than forty books for young people, many of which have received awards and honors. She lives with her husband in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Carolyn Meyer has made something of a specialty of the Tudors recently. Her well-received Mary, Bloody Mary is now followed in the "Young Royals" series with this fictional autobiography of Elizabeth of England in her years before becoming queen. Once one sorts out the exquisitely complex genealogy of the players (conveniently laid out in a genealogical chart), Elizabeth's story takes off. Her voice is certainly more modern than Elizabethan, but that nod to contemporary readers is soon forgotten in the world of the court and its Byzantine intrigues which unfold before us. As heads fall and heretics burn, it's hard not to root for young Elizabeth's succession to the throne—as soon as possible! A brief ending historical note puts all in perspective for young readers. 2001, Gulliver/Harcourt, $17.00. Ages 12 up. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
VOYA
Set in turbulent sixteenth-century England, this novel is an entertaining tale of intrigue, self-discovery, and royal wrangling. Readers meet the future queen of England, thirteen-year-old Elizabeth Tudor, shortly after the death of her father, Henry VIII. Ever aware of her royal allegiances and duties, Elizabeth disregards her own feelings of loss to comfort her nine-year-old brother, Edward, the new king. As a pawn in the great drama of royal succession, Elizabeth must stay out of trouble and wait for her inevitable turn at the throne. The story ends rather abruptly with her long-awaited coronation, leaving readers wanting. Unlike many works of historical fiction for young adults, Meyers's book offers teens more than just a glimpse at the time period, taking a deeper look at faith, social class divisions, and individuality. All characters are flesh and blood, memorable and true. Elizabeth's half sister, Queen Mary, appears unreasonable and vindictive, but Elizabeth does not condemn her. Rather, she tries to understand this woman who fears her so, and in doing so, comes to terms with her own doubt about her ability to rule. This work has a strong female protagonist who possesses a considerable understanding of her place in society and world history. Regrettably, the book does not spend more time exploring Elizabeth's relationship with Robin Dudley, which formed the basis of the recent Academy Award-winning film of the queen's life, Elizabeth. With its wide appeal, this first-person story is a highly recommended purchase for all public and school libraries. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined asgrades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2001, Harcourt, 224p, Ages 12 to 18. Reviewer: Stefani Koorey SOURCE: VOYA, June 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 2)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-As the title suggests, this gripping historical drama tells of the danger Elizabeth Tudor faced on her way to the throne of England. The novel is not meant to portray Elizabeth's whole life; rather, set within a story frame of her coronation, the narrative relays the hardships, ill treatment, and tragedies that occurred between the death of King Henry VIII and the death of Elizabeth's half sister, Queen Mary. Because the story is told in first person, readers have a sense of being with Elizabeth and feeling the uncertainty, apprehension, and determination she feels. The author does not pull any punches when it comes to telling about Elizabeth's feelings for Tom Seymour, her religious convictions, or the bloodshed caused at the behest of Queen Mary. The political intrigue and changing alliances could be confusing, but a family tree at the front of the book helps readers keep most of the relatives straight. If only there were a chart of court advisors, foreign dignitaries, and servants! Reading Jane Yolen's The Queen's Own Fool (Philomel, 2000), about Elizabeth's cousin Mary, Queen of Scots, would be an interesting comparison/contrast study with this novel because both women faced similar types of opposition. Elizabeth was a unique person in her own time, and her intelligence, drive, and independence will appeal to today's readers.-Cheri Estes, Detroit Country Day School Middle School, Beverly Hills, MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"High drama. . . . The elements of Elizabeth's life remain irresistible."—Booklist
"Gripping."—School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613980586
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Series:
Young Royals Series
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
4.48(w) x 7.10(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

CAROLYN MEYER is the celebrated author of more than forty books for young people, many of which have received awards and honors. She lives with her husband in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Beware, Princess Elizabeth 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book, im 13 and i cant stop reading it. Its historically accurate and I reread it alot. Along with Mry bloody Mary I love theesebooks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is pretty good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well this book is really good but i also think that it is kinda confusing im 12 and i have to read it for reading counts but other wise i think that it is a great book!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite book ever I hqve read it at least 10 times all the way through
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great book! I injoyed learing about all the young royals. :P
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If your a person who loves history or wants to learn about the English monarchies then this is the book for you
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i Love the book sooo much i have read it 2 times, its a wonderful book about queen Elizabeth when she was younger. When i was in school and they were explainng it to us and i did'nt really understand, I thought it was instersting. Reading this book made me understand more about her, her father, and her sister and there whole sitution!! This Book i could READ, READ and READ Again(:
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for school, and I thought I was going to hate it because I had never found the Tudors very interesting, but after I read this book I imediatly fell in love with Elizabeth and her amazing story. Meyer does an awesome job in giving details and making you feel like you were really hearing this story from Elizabeth herself. I love this book!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beware, Princess Elizabeth is an entertaining novel about the young Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King Henry VIII. It is full of drama and conspiracies as the princess struggles for her life while her older half sister, Mary, is on the throne. The novel masterfully tells of Elizabeth's life as a teenager and young adult, showing her independence, confidence, and bold new ideas and points of view. Although it is a historical novel involving subjects relevant to the pre-Elizabethan era, all of the themes in the book are still dealt with in this modern age. Themes such as true love, betrayal, loss of innocence, and true happiness are subtly placed throughout the book's pages as Elizabeth tries to keep her identity as Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King Henry VII, without being accused of conspiring against her sister or anyone in the ranks of power. Elizabeth tries her best to live a quiet, peaceful life after the death of her father, but danger and turmoil always find a way back to her. For example, while living with her step mother, the young princess focusses greatly upon her studies yet she can barely live with herself as she finds her heart set upon the affections of Tom Seymour, her step mother's new husband. As she silently disciplines herself for even considering him attractive in such ways, Tom Seymour is also attracted to her. In the end this secret love ends in tragedy as Tom only used her for his own political gain, leaving him charged with treason and Elizabeth accused of conspiring against the Queen and with a broken heart. The amazing thing about such a soap-opera like drama is that it is not made up. Carolyn Meyer does her best to stick to the facts, as the truth is ore jaw-dropping than anything she could have made up. Unlike other "historically based" novels, Beware, Princess Elizabeth is mostly compliant with historical facts. She keeps consistent with the timeline of events in Elizabeth's life and merely reiterates what emotions she must have been feeling during such turbulent times. Like a diary, you can see Elizabeth's life through her own eyes and as a result, understand what life was like for this young royal.
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anastasia92 More than 1 year ago
I admit, the only reason I picked this book up at Barnes and Noble was because of a book report for Social Studies I had to do. Although I am a heavy reader, I generally avoid historical fiction. However, this book absolutely blew me away! It was very easy and entertaining to read, and I finished it in two days. Carolyn Meyer did an amazing job at portraying Elizabeth as a pawn in the drama of the royal succession. The numerous well-developed characters greatly add to the intrigue of the book, making it a page-turner. I greatly recommend this book to anyone who is looking for an educational, but an interesting to real historical fiction book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tenniswithstyle More than 1 year ago
This book gives you a good perspective of that time period, and gives you the chance to look into people's minds. Before I read this I didn't have the greatest grasp on the royal family of England of that time period. Now that I've read it, I really understand how the whole system worked. Reading this will not only be informative but inspiring. I recommend for anyone interested in history to read this, but if your not interested in history, then chances are that you'll be better off with something else.
civilwargirl More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed Carolyn Meyer's portrayal of the early life of Elizabeth I when she was a princess. I read a lot of Tudor era fiction, and most written for adults depict Elizabeth I as nothing more than an seductresses with a raging temper. In Beware, Princess Elizabeth Meyer, in my opinion is more accurate. Elizabeth was a strong, independent woman who lived in a difficult time who had to rely on her wits to keep herself alive. Meyer book brings this all to life and I think that teenage girls will be inspired by this fascinating woman.