Beware!: R.L. Stine Picks His Favorite Scary Stories

Beware!: R.L. Stine Picks His Favorite Scary Stories

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by R. L. Stine, Various
     
 

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Dim the lights. Lock the doors. Pull down the shades -- and beware! It's time to read R.L. Stine's favorite scary stories, plus two new tales of his own. R.L. Stine has gathered a selection of all things scary. Short stories, tales old and new, comics, and poems. It's a spine-tingling collection of work by dozens of writers and artists who are famous for hair-raising… See more details below

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Overview

Dim the lights. Lock the doors. Pull down the shades -- and beware! It's time to read R.L. Stine's favorite scary stories, plus two new tales of his own. R.L. Stine has gathered a selection of all things scary. Short stories, tales old and new, comics, and poems. It's a spine-tingling collection of work by dozens of writers and artists who are famous for hair-raising fun. Discover a ghastly secret in a retelling of the classic story "The Judge's House," by Bram Stoker. Peek into a Christmas stocking that holds a shocking surprise in a Vault of Horror comic, "A Sock for Christmas." Meet an ice cream man who will chill your blood in "Mister Ice Cold" by Gahan Wilson. But first, visit an evil carnival in "The Black Ferris," by Ray Bradbury. R.L. Stine says that this story changed his life! Find out why in his introduction. Be sure to read all the introductions -- because R.L. reveals why he picked these stories for you, why he finds them the creepiest ... the funniest ... the scariest!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The renowned horror author selects 19 nailbiting tales for Beware!: R.L. Stine Picks His Favorite Scary Stories, including "The Black Ferris" by Ray Bradbury, William Sleator's "The Elevator," a couple by Alvin Schwartz and a few by Stine himself. Each opens with a brief introduction by the Goosebumps author and includes bewitching b&w pictures by a number of illustrators. (Aug.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
One can't go wrong when reading this anthology of scary stories selected by R.L. Stine. Poems, short stories, and well done illustrations line each page. Stine includes an introductory page to each selection telling why he selected the story and why he personally likes each selection. Some of the stories are unique in the fact that they date back more than five hundred years. While most of the stories are probably not appropriate for very young children�due to the fact that these selections contain ghosts, vampires, witches, etc.�there are a few that are cute and humorous and not too scary. I especially like "Joe is Not a Monster" and "Blood-Curdling Story." Younger children may also like the less scary selections such as "The Conjure Brother," "Haunted," and "The Witches." For older children who really like suspenseful tales I would recommend "The Surprise Guest," "The Judge's House," and "A Sock for Christmas." Overall, I feel that Stine searched for selections that he really thought highly of and by reading his introductory words and the few works of his own that he includes, one can tell that he has a knack for storytelling and certainly is aware of what kids like to read. Any child who has enjoyed Stine's "Goosebump" or his "Fear Street" series will surely love this book. 2002, Parachute Press,
— Jayme Derbyshire
VOYA
This compilation of nineteen scary stories has something for everyone. Stine, best known for his Goosebumps series, gathers a collection of varied formats: poetry from Shel Silverstein, a classic horror story from Ray Bradbury, modern spine-tinglers by Jack Prelutsky and William Sleator, and even a graphic novel-like comic episode from A Vault of Horror (Gladstone Comics). The shortest entry is barely a page; the longer stories are about twenty pages long. By turns tongue-in-cheek and seriously gruesome, these diverse tales would provide most middle school and junior high aged teens with several hours of blood-chilling pleasure. Stine also pays attention to the tastes of younger teens through the packaging of his material. The oversized cover art is wonderfully lurid, with a clawed werewolf-like monster leering at the reader over a moonlit tombstone. Spiderwebs grace all the pages without major illustrations as well as Stine's enticing introductions to the tales. Master illustrators such as Shel Silverstein, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Kamen shine, but lesser-known artists also deliver some edgy, eerie black-and-white line drawings. This collection would make fascinating Halloween recreational reading for most teens and is also suitable for reluctant readers. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2002, HarperCollins, 224p,
— Debbie Earl
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-This collection of 23 stories and poems includes selections by Ray Bradbury, Patricia McKissack, Edward Gorey, Bram Stoker, William Sleator, Alvin Schwartz, Jack Prelutsky, Shel Silverstein, and others. Among the illustrators represented are Brian Pinkney, Quentin Blake, Gahan Wilson, and Peter Horvath. While all of the stories are available elsewhere, some of the best are found in more obscure sources. Having them in one volume, with each tale introduced by Stine, makes this a good choice for most collections. The selections read aloud well and are short enough to read in several minutes. The more terrifying selections are juxtaposed with those that are funny, providing some comic relief. Children who enjoyed Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (1981) and More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (1984, both HarperCollins) will want to add this title to their reading lists. The pen-and-ink and charcoal illustrations visually clue readers as to how each tale ranks on the "scary barometer." The grizzly selections have very dark pictures while the more lighthearted ones have clean, clear strokes and more white space on the page. This is an obvious choice for children who love a good scare from time to time.-Molly S. Kinney, Office of Public Library Services, Atlanta, GA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780066238425
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/28/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
726,699
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 9.12(h) x 0.75(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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